Publications by authors named "Colby J Vorland"

21 Publications

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Improving open and rigorous science: ten key future research opportunities related to rigor, reproducibility, and transparency in scientific research.

F1000Res 2020 14;9:1235. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Indiana University School of Public Health, Bloomington, IN, 47403, USA.

As part of a coordinated effort to expand research activity around rigor, reproducibility, and transparency (RRT) across scientific disciplines, a team of investigators at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington hosted a workshop in October 2019 with international leaders to discuss key opportunities for RRT research. The workshop aimed to identify research priorities and opportunities related to RRT. Over two-days, workshop attendees gave presentations and participated in three working groups: (1) Improving Education & Training in RRT, (2) Reducing Statistical Errors and Increasing Analytic Transparency, and (3) Looking Outward: Increasing Truthfulness and Accuracy of Research Communications. Following small-group discussions, the working groups presented their findings, and participants discussed the research opportunities identified. The investigators compiled a list of research priorities, which were circulated to all participants for feedback. Participants identified the following priority research questions: (1) Can RRT-focused statistics and mathematical modeling courses improve statistics practice?; (2) Can specialized training in scientific writing improve transparency?; (3) Does modality (e.g. face to face, online) affect the efficacy RRT-related education?; (4) How can automated programs help identify errors more efficiently?; (5) What is the prevalence and impact of errors in scientific publications (e.g., analytic inconsistencies, statistical errors, and other objective errors)?; (6) Do error prevention workflows reduce errors?; (7) How do we encourage post-publication error correction?; (8) How does 'spin' in research communication affect stakeholder understanding and use of research evidence?; (9) Do tools to aid writing research reports increase comprehensiveness and clarity of research reports?; and (10) Is it possible to inculcate scientific values and norms related to truthful, rigorous, accurate, and comprehensive scientific reporting? Participants identified important and relatively unexplored questions related to improving RRT. This list may be useful to the scientific community and investigators seeking to advance meta-science (i.e. research on research).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.26594.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898357PMC
October 2020

Contrary to the Conclusions Stated in the Paper, Only Dry Fat-Free Mass Was Different between Groups upon Reanalysis. Comment on: "Intermittent Energy Restriction Attenuates the Loss of Fat-Free Mass in Resistance Trained Individuals. A Randomized Controlled Trial".

J Funct Morphol Kinesiol 2020 Nov 20;5(4). Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Faculty of Science, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

Campbell and colleagues recently published a randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of diets involving intermittent energy restriction versus continuous energy restriction on changes in body composition and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in resistance-trained adults[...].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5040085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7739336PMC
November 2020

Double-counting of effect sizes and inappropriate exclusion of studies in "The influence of vitamin D supplementation on IGF-1 levels in humans: A systematic review and meta-analysis".

Ageing Res Rev 2021 03 15;66:101236. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.

We read with interest the review by Kord-Varkaneh et al. which examined the effects of vitamin D supplementation on IGF-1 levels in humans. We believe that the article suffers from severe methodological faults and subsequently the conclusions are likely to be biased. Thus, the authors should address the mentioned limitations and update the analyses to provide robust and trustful estimates. We are concerned that without correction, the analyses may lead to erroneous findings and conclusions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arr.2020.101236DOI Listing
March 2021

Overstated Claims of Efficacy and Safety. Comment On: "Optimal Nutritional Status for a Well-Functioning Immune System Is an Important Factor to Protect Against Viral Infections". 2020, , 1181.

Nutrients 2020 09 3;12(9). Epub 2020 Sep 3.

Department of Applied Health Science, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA.

Calder et al [...].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12092690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7551966PMC
September 2020

Adverse Effects of Autoclaved Diets on the Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in Rats.

Am J Nephrol 2020 6;51(5):381-389. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Division of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA,

Background: Autoclaving rodent diets is common in laboratory animals, but autoclaving increases the formation of dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGE). We studied the effect of autoclaved (AC) diet alone or in combination with a diet high in bioavailable phosphorus on biochemistries of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), intestinal gene expression, and oxidative stress.

Methods: Male CKD rats (Cy/+) and normal littermates were fed 1 of 3 diets: AC 0.7% phosphorus grain-based diet for 28 weeks (AC); AC diet for 17 weeks followed by non-autoclaved (Non-AC) 0.7% phosphorus casein diet until 28 weeks (AC + Casein); or Non-AC diet for 16 weeks followed by a Non-AC purified diet until 30 weeks (Non-AC + Casein).

Results: AC diets contained ~3× higher AGEs and levels varied depending on the location within the autoclave. Rats fed the AC and AC + Casein diets had higher total AGEs and oxidative stress, irrespective of kidney function. Kidney function was more severely compromised in CKD rats fed AC or AC + Casein compared to Non-AC + Casein. There was a disease-by-diet interaction for plasma phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, and c-terminal fibroblast growth factor-23, driven by high values in the CKD rats fed the AC + Casein diet. Compared to Non-AC + Casein, AC and AC + Casein-fed groups had increased expression of receptor of AGEs and intestinal NADPH oxidase dual oxidase-2, independent of kidney function.

Conclusions: Autoclaving rodent diets impacts the progression of CKD and CKD-MBD, highlighting the critical importance of standardizing diets in experiments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000506729DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7228841PMC
March 2020

Science dialogue mapping of knowledge and knowledge gaps related to the effects of dairy intake on human cardiovascular health and disease.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2021 19;61(2):179-195. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.

Dairy has been described as everything from a superfood to a poison; yet, arguments, assumptions, and data justifying these labels are not always clear. We used an issue-based information system, "dialogue mapping™," to summarize scientific points of a live panel discussion on the putative effects of dairy on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) from a day-long session among experts in nutrition and CVD. Dialogue mapping captures relations among ideas to explicitly, logically, and visually connect issues/questions, ideas, pro/con arguments, and agreements, even if discussed at different times. Experts discussed two propositions: for CVD risk, consumption of full-fat dairy products 1) should be minimized, in part because of their saturated fat content, or 2) need not be minimized, despite their saturated fat content. The panel discussed the dairy-CVD relation through blood lipids, diabetes, obesity, energy balance, blood pressure, dairy bioactives, biobehavioral components, and other putative causal pathways. Associations and effects reported in the literature have varied by fat content of dairy elements considered, study design, intake methods, and biomarker versus disease outcomes. Two conceptual topics emerged from the discussion: 1) individual variability: whether recommendations should be targeted only to those at high CVD risk; 2) quality of evidence: whether data on dairy-CVD relations are strong enough for reliable conclusions-positive, negative, or null. Future procedural improvements for science dialog mapping include using singular rather than competing propositions for discussion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2020.1722941DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7434715PMC
December 2020

Toward fulfilling the aspirational goal of science as self-correcting: A call for editorial courage and diligence for error correction.

Eur J Clin Invest 2020 02 18;50(2):e13190. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eci.13190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7422661PMC
February 2020

Kidney Disease Progression Does Not Decrease Intestinal Phosphorus Absorption in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

J Bone Miner Res 2020 02 15;35(2):333-342. Epub 2019 Nov 15.

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

The Cy/+ rat has been characterized as a progressive model of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). We aimed to determine the effect of kidney disease progression on intestinal phosphorus absorption and whole-body phosphorus balance in this model. A total of 48 Cy/+ (CKD) and 48 normal littermates (NL) rats were studied at two ages: 20 weeks and 30 weeks, to model progressive kidney function decline at approximately 50% and 20% of normal kidney function. Sodium-dependent and sodium-independent intestinal phosphorus absorption efficiency were measured by the in situ jejunal ligated loop method using P radioisotope. Our results show that CKD rats had slightly higher sodium-dependent phosphorus absorption compared to NL rats, and absorption decreased from 20 to 30 weeks. These results are in contrast to plasma 1,25OH D, which was lower in CKD rats. Gene expression of the major intestinal phosphorus transporter, NaPi-2b, was not different between CKD and NL rats in the jejunum but was lower in CKD rats versus NL rats in the duodenum. Jejunal ligated loop phosphorus absorption results are consistent with percent net phosphorus absorption results obtained from metabolic balance: higher net percent phosphorus absorption values in CKD rats compared with NL, and lower values in 30-week-olds compared with 20-week-olds. Phosphorus balance was negative (below zero) in CKD rats, significantly lower in 30-week-old rats compared with 20-week-old rats, and lower in CKD rats compared with NL rats at both ages. These results demonstrate no reduction in intestinal phosphorus absorption with progression of CKD despite lower 1,25OH D status when assessed by an in situ ligated loop test, which is in contrast to the majority of in vitro studies, and if confirmed in further studies, could challenge the physiological relevance of in vitro findings. © 2019 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.3894DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7012714PMC
February 2020

Spin in the abstract in "Impact of motivational interviewing on outcomes of an adolescent obesity treatment: Results from the MI Values randomized controlled pilot trial".

Clin Obes 2019 10 4;9(5):e12332. Epub 2019 Aug 4.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cob.12332DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6718333PMC
October 2019

Effect of ovariectomy on the progression of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in female Cy/+ rats.

Sci Rep 2019 05 28;9(1):7936. Epub 2019 May 28.

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.

Male Cy/+ rats have shown a relatively consistent pattern of progressive kidney disease development that displays multiple key features of late stage chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD), specifically the development of cortical bone porosity. However, progression of disease in female Cy/+ rats, assessed in limited studies, is more heterogeneous and to date has failed to show development of the CKD-MBD phenotype, thus limiting their use as a practical model of progressive CKD-MBD. Animal and human studies suggest that estrogen may be protective against kidney disease in addition to its established protective effect on bone. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine the effect of ovariectomy (OVX) on the biochemical and skeletal manifestations of CKD-MBD in Cy/+ female rats. We hypothesized that OVX would accelerate development of the biochemical and skeletal features of CKD-MBD in female Cy/+ rats, similar to those seen in male Cy/+ rats. Female Cy/+ rats underwent OVX (n = 8) or Sham (n = 8) surgery at 15 weeks of age. Blood was collected every 5 weeks post-surgery until 35 weeks of age, when the rats underwent a 4-day metabolic balance, and the tibia and final blood were collected at the time of sacrifice. OVX produced the expected changes in trabecular and cortical parameters consistent with post-menopausal disease, and negative phosphorus balance compared with Sham. However, indicators of CKD-MBD were similar between OVX and Sham (similar kidney weight, plasma blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, creatinine clearance, phosphorus, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and no cortical porosity). Contrary to our hypothesis, OVX did not produce evidence of development of the CKD-MBD phenotype in female Cy/+ rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44415-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6538713PMC
May 2019

Effect of dietary phosphorus intake and age on intestinal phosphorus absorption efficiency and phosphorus balance in male rats.

PLoS One 2018 19;13(11):e0207601. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States of America.

Intestinal phosphorus absorption is an important component of whole-body phosphorus metabolism, and limiting dietary phosphorus absorption is particularly of interest as a therapeutic target in patients with chronic kidney disease to manage mineral bone disorders. Yet, mechanisms and regulation of intestinal phosphorus absorption have not been adequately studied and discrepancies in findings exist based on the absorption assessment technique used. In vitro techniques show rather consistent effects of dietary phosphorus intake level and age on intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate transport. But, the few studies that have used in vivo techniques conflict with these in vitro studies. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of dietary phosphorus intake level on phosphorus absorption using the in situ ligated loop technique in three different aged rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 72), were studied at 10-, 20-, and 30-weeks-of-age on a low (0.1%), normal (0.6%), or high (1.2%) phosphorus diet in a 3x3 factorial design (n = 8/group). Rats were fed their assigned diet for 2-weeks prior to absorption testing by jejunal ligated loop as a non-survival procedure, utilizing 33P radioisotope. Metabolic cages were used for determination of calcium and phosphorus balance over the final four days prior to sacrifice, and blood was collected at the time of sacrifice for biochemistries. Our results show that phosphorus absorption was higher in 10-week-old rats compared with 20- and 30-week-olds and this corresponded to higher gene expression of the major phosphate transporter, NaPi-2b, as well as higher whole-body phosphorus balance and net phosphorus absorption. Dietary phosphorus intake level did not affect jejunal phosphorus absorption or NaPi-2b gene expression. Our results contrast with studies utilizing in vitro techniques, but corroborate results of other rodent studies utilizing in situ or in vivo methods. Thus, there is need for additional studies that employ more physiological methods of phosphorus absorption assessment.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0207601PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6242370PMC
April 2019

Phosphorus Balance in Adolescent Girls and the Effect of Supplemental Dietary Calcium.

JBMR Plus 2018 03 29;2(2):103-108. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

There are limited data on phosphorus balance and the effect of dietary calcium supplements on phosphorus balance in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine phosphorus balance and the effect of increasing dietary calcium intake with a supplement on net phosphorus absorption and balance in healthy adolescent girls. This study utilized stored urine, fecal, and diet samples from a previously conducted study that focused on calcium balance. Eleven healthy girls ages 11 to 14 years participated in a randomized crossover study, which consisted of two 3-week periods of a controlled diet with low (817 ± 19.5 mg/d) or high (1418 ± 11.1 mg/d) calcium, separated by a 1-week washout period. Phosphorus intake was controlled at the same level during both placebo and calcium supplementation (1435 ± 23.5 and 1453 ± 28.0 mg/d, respectively, = 0.611). Mean phosphorus balance was positive by about 200 mg/d and was unaffected by the calcium supplement ( = 0.826). Urinary phosphorus excretion was lower with the calcium supplement (535 ± 42 versus 649 ± 41 mg/d, = 0.013), but fecal phosphorus and net phosphorus absorption were not significantly different between placebo and calcium supplement (553 ± 60 versus 678 ± 63 versus mg/d, = 0.143; 876 ± 62 versus 774 ± 64 mg/d, = 0.231, respectively). Dietary phosphorus underestimates using a nutrient database compared with the content measured chemically from meal composites by ~40%. These results show that phosphorus balance is positive in girls during adolescent growth and that a calcium dietary supplement to near the current recommended level does not affect phosphorus balance when phosphorus intake is at 1400 mg/d, a typical US intake level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm4.10026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5863929PMC
March 2018

Effects of Excessive Dietary Phosphorus Intake on Bone Health.

Curr Osteoporos Rep 2017 10;15(5):473-482

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.

Purpose Of Review: The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of dietary phosphorus, its sources, recommended intakes, and its absorption and metabolism in health and in chronic kidney disease and to discuss recent findings in this area with a focus on the effects of inorganic phosphate additives in bone health.

Recent Findings: Recent findings show that increasing dietary phosphorus through inorganic phosphate additives has detrimental effects on bone and mineral metabolism in humans and animals. There is new data supporting an educational intervention to limit phosphate additives in patients with chronic kidney disease to control serum phosphate. The average intake of phosphorus in the USA is well above the recommended dietary allowance. Inorganic phosphate additives, which are absorbed at a high rate, account for a substantial and likely underestimated portion of this excessive intake. These additives have negative effects on bone metabolism and present a prime opportunity to lower total phosphorus intake in the USA. Further evidence is needed to confirm whether lowering dietary phosphorus intake would have beneficial effects to improve fracture risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11914-017-0398-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5693714PMC
October 2017

Erratum to: Diet and Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein.

Curr Diab Rep 2017 04;17(4):27

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11892-017-0861-8DOI Listing
April 2017

Diet and Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein.

Curr Diab Rep 2017 03;17(3):15

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.

Purpose Of Review: The goal of this review is to present an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of plant-based diets in delaying progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD).

Recent Findings: The ideal quantity of dietary protein has been a controversial topic for patients with DKD. Smaller studies have focused on protein source, plant versus animal, for preventing progression. Limited evidence suggests that dietary patterns that focus on plant-based foods, those that are lower in processed foods, or those that are lower in advanced glycation end products (AGE) may be useful in prevention of DKD progression. Increasing plant-based foods, incorporating diet patterns that limit processed foods, or potentially lowering AGE contents in diets may be beneficial for dietary management of DKD. However, dietary studies specifically targeted at DKD treatment are sparse. Further, large trials powered to assess outcomes including changes in kidney function, end-stage kidney disease, and mortality are needed to provide more substantial evidence for these diets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11892-017-0843-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5503680PMC
March 2017