Publications by authors named "Clothilde Roche"

9 Publications

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Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibition Prevents Experimental Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome.

Front Mol Biosci 2020 11;7:604042. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Normandie University, UNIROUEN, INSERM U1096, FHU REMOD-VHF, Rouen, France.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to assess the cardiovascular impact of the pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), which metabolizes the endothelium-derived vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (DHETs), in the 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model. Compared to sham-operated mice, there was decrease in EET-to-DHET ratio 3 months after surgery in vehicle-treated Nx mice but not in mice treated with the sEH inhibitor -AUCB. Nx induced an increase in plasma creatinine and in urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio as well as the development of kidney histological lesions, all of which were not modified by -AUCB. In addition, -AUCB did not oppose Nx-induced blood pressure increase. However, AUCB prevented the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by Nx, as well as normalized the echocardiographic indices of diastolic and systolic function. Moreover, the reduction in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation of isolated mesenteric arteries induced by Nx was blunted by -AUCB without change in endothelium-independent dilatation to sodium nitroprusside. Inhibition of sEH reduces the cardiac remodelling, and the diastolic and systolic dysfunctions associated with CKD. These beneficial effects may be mediated by the prevention of endothelial dysfunction, independent from kidney preservation and antihypertensor effect. Thus, inhibition of sEH holds a therapeutic potential in preventing type 4 cardiorenal syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmolb.2020.604042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7991096PMC
March 2021

Preservation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid bioavailability prevents renal allograft dysfunction and cardiovascular alterations in kidney transplant recipients.

Sci Rep 2021 Feb 12;11(1):3739. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, 76000, Rouen, France.

This study addressed the hypothesis that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized by CYP450 and catabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) are involved in the maintenance of renal allograft function, either directly or through modulation of cardiovascular function. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the sEH gene EPHX2 and CYP450 on renal and vascular function, plasma levels of EETs and peripheral blood monuclear cell sEH activity was assessed in 79 kidney transplant recipients explored at least one year after transplantation. Additional experiments in a mouse model mimicking the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury suffered by the transplanted kidney evaluated the cardiovascular and renal effects of the sEH inhibitor t-AUCB administered in drinking water (10 mg/l) during 28 days after surgery. There was a long-term protective effect of the sEH SNP rs6558004, which increased EET plasma levels, on renal allograft function and a deleterious effect of K55R, which increased sEH activity. Surprisingly, the loss-of-function CYP2C9*3 was associated with a better renal function without affecting EET levels. R287Q SNP, which decreased sEH activity, was protective against vascular dysfunction while CYP2C8*3 and 2C9*2 loss-of-function SNP, altered endothelial function by reducing flow-induced EET release. In I/R mice, sEH inhibition reduced kidney lesions, prevented cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction as well as preserved endothelial function. The preservation of EET bioavailability may prevent allograft dysfunction and improve cardiovascular disease in kidney transplant recipients. Inhibition of sEH appears thus as a novel therapeutic option but its impact on other epoxyfatty acids should be carefully evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-83274-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7881112PMC
February 2021

Altered bioavailability of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids is associated with conduit artery endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients.

Cardiovasc Diabetol 2019 03 18;18(1):35. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, 76000, Rouen Cedex, France.

Background: This pathophysiological study addressed the hypothesis that soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), which metabolizes the vasodilator and anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), contributes to conduit artery endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

Methods And Results: Radial artery endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation in response to hand skin heating was reduced in essential hypertensive patients (n = 9) and type 2 diabetic subjects with (n = 19) or without hypertension (n = 10) compared to healthy subjects (n = 36), taking into consideration cardiovascular risk factors, flow stimulus and endothelium-independent dilatation to glyceryl trinitrate. Diabetic patients but not non-diabetic hypertensive subjects displayed elevated whole blood reactive oxygen species levels and loss of NO release during heating, assessed by measuring local plasma nitrite variation. Moreover, plasma levels of EET regioisomers increased during heating in healthy subjects, did not change in hypertensive patients and decreased in diabetic patients. Correlation analysis showed in the overall population that the less NO and EETs bioavailability increases during heating, the more flow-mediated dilatation is reduced. The expression and activity of sEH, measured in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, was elevated in diabetic but not hypertensive patients, leading to increased EETs conversion to DHETs. Finally, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps induced a decrease in flow-mediated dilatation in healthy subjects and this was associated with an altered EETs release during heating.

Conclusions: These results demonstrate that an increased EETs degradation by sEH and altered NO bioavailability are associated with conduit artery endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients independently from their hypertensive status. The hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic state in these patients may contribute to these alterations. Trial registration NCT02311075. Registered December 8, 2014.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12933-019-0843-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423843PMC
March 2019

Physiological role of endothelin-1 in flow-mediated vasodilatation in humans and impact of cardiovascular risk factors.

J Hypertens 2017 06;35(6):1204-1212

aDepartment of Pharmacology, Rouen University HospitalbInstitut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1096cInstitute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine, Normandy University, University of RouendCentre d'Investigation Clinique (CIC)-INSERM 1404, Rouen University HospitaleEquipe d'Accueil (EA) 4651, Rouen, France.

Objectives: The current study addressed the hypothesis that the local decrease in endothelin-1 (ET-1) bioavailability during sustained flow increases contributes to endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of conduit arteries and is altered in presence of cardiovascular risk factors.

Methods And Results: In nine young healthy individuals, the decrease in local ET-1 plasma levels and radial artery FMD in response to hand skin heating (from 34 to 44 °C) was not affected by endothelin type A (ETA) receptor blockade, achieved using the brachial infusion of BQ-123 (100 nmol/min per l of forearm), as compared with physiological saline (0.9% NaCl) infusion. In contrast, endothelin type B (ETB) receptor blockade with BQ-788 (10 nmol/min per l) suppressed the decrease in plasma ET-1 during heating and reduced FMD, without altering nitric oxide release. The coinfusion of BQ-123 did not affect the inhibitory effect of ETB receptor blockade on the decrease in ET-1 plasma levels during heating but prevented the reduction in FMD. Basal radial artery parameters, systemic hemodynamics, and endothelium-independent dilatation to glyceryl trinitrate were not modified by ETA and/or ETB blockade. In a general population of 40 participants without treatment or major cardiovascular diseases, including the nine healthy individuals, the reduction in endothelin-1 level during heating was correlated with FMD (r = -0.55, P < 0.001) and decreased with increased age (r = 0.49, P = 0.001), mean arterial blood pressure (r = 0.48, P = 0.002), and total cholesterol level (r = 0.37, P = 0.024).

Conclusion: The uptake of endothelin-1 by ETB receptors contributes to conduit artery FMD, preventing its vasoconstrictor action mediated by ETA receptors. The alteration of this mechanism by cardiovascular risk factors may contribute to endothelial dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001307DOI Listing
June 2017

A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of regioisomers of epoxyeicosatrienoic and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids in human plasma during endothelial stimulation.

Anal Bioanal Chem 2017 Mar 15;409(7):1845-1855. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, 76031, Rouen, France.

Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are vasodilating lipid mediators metabolized into dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) by soluble epoxide hydrolase. We aimed to develop a LC-MS/MS method to quantify EETs and DHETs in human plasma and monitored their levels during vascular endothelial stimulation. Plasma samples, collected from 14 healthy and five hypertensive subjects at baseline and during radial artery endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation, were spiked with internal standards. Lipids were then extracted by a modified Bligh and Dyer method and saponified to release bound EETs and DHETs. Samples were purified by a second liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The assay allowed identification of (±)8(9)-epoxy-5Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid (8,9-EET); (±)11(12)-epoxy-5Z,8Z,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET); (±)14(15)-epoxy-5Z,8Z,11Z-eicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET); (±)8,9-dihydroxy-5Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid (8,9-DHET); (±)11,12-dihydroxy-5Z,8Z,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid (11,12-DHET); and (±)14,15-dihydroxy-5Z,8Z,11Z-eicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET). (±)5(6)-epoxy-5Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid (5,6-EET) was virtually undetectable due to its chemical instability. The limits of quantification were 0.25 ng/mL for DHETs and 0.5 ng/mL for EETs. Intra- and inter-assay variations ranged from 1.6 to 13.2%. Heating induced a similar increase in 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET levels and in corresponding DHET levels in healthy but not in hypertensive subjects. We validated a sensitive LC-MS/MS method for measuring simultaneously plasma EET and DHET regioisomers in human plasma and showed its interest for assessing endothelial function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-016-0129-1DOI Listing
March 2017

Impact of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition on early kidney damage in hyperglycemic overweight mice.

Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat 2015 Jul 27;120:148-54. Epub 2015 May 27.

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1096, Rouen, France; University of Rouen, Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine (IRIB), Rouen, France; Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France. Electronic address:

This study addressed the hypothesis that inhibition of the EETs degrading enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase affords renal protection in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy. The renal effects of the sEH inhibitor t-AUCB (10mg/l in drinking water) were compared to those of the sulfonylurea glibenclamide (80mg/l), both administered for 8 weeks in FVB mice subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat) for 16 weeks. Mice on control chow diet (10% fat) and non-treated HFD mice served as controls. Compared with non-treated HFD mice, HFD mice treated with t-AUCB had a decreased EET degradation, as shown by their higher plasma EETs-to-DHETs ratio, and an increased EET production, as shown by the increase in EETs+DHETs levels, which was associated with induction of CYP450 epoxygenase expression. Both agents similarly reduced fasting glycemia but only t-AUCB prevented the increase in the urinary albumine-to-creatinine ratio in HFD mice. Histopathological analysis showed that t-AUCB reduced renal inflammation, which was associated with an increased mRNA expression of the NFκB inhibitor Iκ≡ and related decrease in MCP-1, COX2 and VCAM-1 expressions. Finally, there was a marginally significant increase in reactive oxygen species production in HFD mice, together with an enhanced NOX2 expression. Both agents did not modify these parameters but t-AUCB increased the expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1. These results demonstrate that, independently from its glucose-lowering effect, sEH inhibition prevents microalbuminuria and renal inflammation in overweight hyperglycemic mice, suggesting that this pharmacological strategy could be useful in the management of diabetic nephropathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2015.04.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4575616PMC
July 2015

Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition improves coronary endothelial function and prevents the development of cardiac alterations in obese insulin-resistant mice.

Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2015 May 27;308(9):H1020-9. Epub 2015 Feb 27.

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1096, Rouen, France; University of Rouen, Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine, Rouen, France; Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France

This study addressed the hypothesis that inhibiting the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH)-mediated degradation of epoxy-fatty acids, notably epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, has an additional impact against cardiovascular damage in insulin resistance, beyond its previously demonstrated beneficial effect on glucose homeostasis. The cardiovascular and metabolic effects of the sEH inhibitor trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB; 10 mg/l in drinking water) were compared with those of the sulfonylurea glibenclamide (80 mg/l), both administered for 8 wk in FVB mice subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% fat) for 16 wk. Mice on control chow diet (10% fat) and nontreated HFD mice served as controls. Glibenclamide and t-AUCB similarly prevented the increased fasting glycemia in HFD mice, but only t-AUCB improved glucose tolerance and decreased gluconeogenesis, without modifying weight gain. Moreover, t-AUCB reduced adipose tissue inflammation, plasma free fatty acids, and LDL cholesterol and prevented hepatic steatosis. Furthermore, only the sEH inhibitor improved endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine, assessed by myography in isolated coronary arteries. This improvement was related to a restoration of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and nitric oxide pathways, as shown by the increased inhibitory effects of the nitric oxide synthase and cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase inhibitors l-NA and MSPPOH on these relaxations. Moreover, t-AUCB decreased cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and inflammation and improved diastolic function, as demonstrated by the increased E/A ratio (echocardiography) and decreased slope of the end-diastolic pressure-volume relation (invasive hemodynamics). These results demonstrate that sEH inhibition improves coronary endothelial function and prevents cardiac remodeling and diastolic dysfunction in obese insulin-resistant mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00465.2014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4551118PMC
May 2015

Polycystin deficiency induces dopamine-reversible alterations in flow-mediated dilatation and vascular nitric oxide release in humans.

Kidney Int 2015 Feb 16;87(2):465-72. Epub 2014 Jul 16.

1] Department of Pharmacology, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France [2] Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1096, Rouen, France [3] Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine, University of Rouen, Rouen, France [4] Centre d'Investigation Clinique (CIC)-INSERM 1404, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France.

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a renal hereditary disorder associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, due to mutations in polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 genes. Endothelial polycystin-deficient cells have an altered mechanosensitivity to fluid shear stress and subsequent deficit in calcium-induced nitric oxide release, prevented by dopamine receptor stimulation. However, the impact of polycystin deficiency on endothelial function in ADPKD patients is still largely unknown. Here we assessed endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation in 21 normotensive ADPKD patients and 21 healthy control subjects, during sustained (hand skin heating) and transient (postischemic hyperemia) flow stimulation. Flow-mediated dilatation was less marked in ADPKD patients than in controls during heating, but it was similar during postischemic hyperemia. There was no difference in endothelium-independent dilatation in response to glyceryl trinitrate. Local plasma nitrite, an indicator of nitric oxide availability, increased during heating in controls but not in patients. Brachial infusion of dopamine in a subset of ADPKD patients stimulated plasma nitrite increase during heating and improved flow-mediated dilatation. Thus, ADPKD patients display a loss of nitric oxide release and an associated reduction in endothelium-dependent dilatation of conduit arteries during sustained blood flow increase. The correction of these anomalies by dopamine suggests future therapeutic strategies that could reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular events in ADPKD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ki.2014.241DOI Listing
February 2015

Design and discovery of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

Expert Opin Drug Discov 2014 Mar 4;9(3):229-43. Epub 2014 Feb 4.

Rouen University Hospital, Department of Pharmacology , Rouen , France.

Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death in developed countries. Increasing evidence shows that the alteration in the normal functions of the vascular endothelium plays a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, specific agents designed to prevent endothelial dysfunction and related cardiovascular complications are still lacking. One emerging strategy is to increase the bioavailability of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), synthesized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases from arachidonic acid. EETs are endothelium-derived hyperpolarising and relaxing factors and display attractive anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties. Genetic polymorphism studies in humans, and experiments in animal models of diseases, have identified soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), the major enzyme involved in EET degradation, as a potential pharmacological target.

Areas Covered: This review presents EET pathway and its functions and summarises the data supporting the development of sEH inhibitors for the treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Furthermore, the authors present the different chemical families of sEH inhibitors developed and their effects in animal models of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

Expert Opinion: Several generations of sEH inhibitors have now been designed to treat endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications for a variety of diseases. The safety of these drugs remains to be carefully investigated, particularly in relation to carcinogenesis. The increasing knowledge of the biological role of each of the EET isomers and of their metabolites may improve their pharmacological profile. This, in turn, could potentially lead to the identification of new pharmacological agents that achieve the cellular effects needed without the deleterious side effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1517/17460441.2014.881354DOI Listing
March 2014