Publications by authors named "Clinda Puvirajasinghe"

3 Publications

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Real-life survey of pitfalls and successes of precision medicine in genetic epilepsies.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2021 Apr 26. Epub 2021 Apr 26.

Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, London, and Chalfont Centre for Epilepsy, Gerrard Cross, UK

Objective: The term 'precision medicine' describes a rational treatment strategy tailored to one person that reverses or modifies the disease pathophysiology. In epilepsy, single case and small cohort reports document nascent precision medicine strategies in specific genetic epilepsies. The aim of this multicentre observational study was to investigate the deeper complexity of precision medicine in epilepsy.

Methods: A systematic survey of patients with epilepsy with a molecular genetic diagnosis was conducted in six tertiary epilepsy centres including children and adults. A standardised questionnaire was used for data collection, including genetic findings and impact on clinical and therapeutic management.

Results: We included 293 patients with genetic epilepsies, 137 children and 156 adults, 162 females and 131 males. Treatment changes were undertaken because of the genetic findings in 94 patients (32%), including rational precision medicine treatment and/or a treatment change prompted by the genetic diagnosis, but not directly related to known pathophysiological mechanisms. There was a rational precision medicine treatment for 56 patients (19%), and this was tried in 33/56 (59%) and was successful (ie, >50% seizure reduction) in 10/33 (30%) patients. In 73/293 (25%) patients there was a treatment change prompted by the genetic diagnosis, but not directly related to known pathophysiological mechanisms, and this was successful in 24/73 (33%).

Significance: Our survey of clinical practice in specialised epilepsy centres shows high variability of clinical outcomes following the identification of a genetic cause for an epilepsy. Meaningful change in the treatment paradigm after genetic testing is not yet possible for many people with epilepsy. This systematic survey provides an overview of the current application of precision medicine in the epilepsies, and suggests the adoption of a more considered approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2020-325932DOI Listing
April 2021

Moyamoya and progressive myoclonic epilepsy secondary to bi-allelic mutations - A previously unreported association.

Epilepsy Behav Rep 2020 31;14:100389. Epub 2020 Aug 31.

Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.

The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a collection of lysosomal storage diseases characterised by the accumulation of characteristic inclusions containing lipofuscin in various tissues of the body and are one of the causes of progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Mutations in at least thirteen genes have been identified as causes of NCL, which can present as infantile, late-infantile, juvenile or adult forms. codes for an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein of unknown function. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of the gene are associated with both late-infantile (LINCL) and adult onset (ANCL) forms of NCL, including Kufs disease, comprising ANCL without associated visual loss. Moyamoya, a rare vasculopathy of the circle of Willis, has been reported in conjunction with a number of inflammatory and other diseases, as well as a handful of lysosomal storage diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Moyamoya in the context of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses or a -related disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebr.2020.100389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7528204PMC
August 2020

Congenital hyperinsulinism due to compound heterozygous mutations in ABCC8 responsive to diazoxide therapy.

J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2020 May;33(5):671-674

Consultant Paediatric Endocrinologist and Honorary Senior Lecturer, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and University of Bristol, Bristol BS2 8BJ, UK.

Background Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI), a condition characterized by dysregulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic β cells, remains one of the most common causes of hyperinsulinemic, hypoketotic hypoglycemia in the newborn period. Mutations in ABCC8 and KCNJ11 constitute the majority of genetic forms of CHI. Case presentation A term macrosomic male baby, birth weight 4.81 kg, born to non-consanguineous parents, presented on day 1 of life with severe and persistent hypoglycemia. The biochemical investigations confirmed a diagnosis of CHI. Diazoxide was started and progressively increased to 15 mg/kg/day to maintain normoglycemia. Sequence analysis identified compound heterozygous mutations in ABCC8 c.4076C>T and c.4119+1G>A inherited from the unaffected father and mother, respectively. The mutations are reported pathogenic. The patient is currently 7 months old with a sustained response to diazoxide. Conclusions Biallelic ABCC8 mutations are known to result in severe, diffuse, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. We report a rare patient with CHI due to compound heterozygous mutations in ABCC8 responsive to diazoxide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2019-0457DOI Listing
May 2020