Professor Clifford Obby Odimegwu, PhD - University of the Witwatersrand - Prof

Professor Clifford Obby Odimegwu

PhD

University of the Witwatersrand

Prof

JOHANNESBURG, GAUTENG | South Africa

Main Specialties: Public Health

Additional Specialties: Demography, Social Statistics, Public Health

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-6273-8807


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Professor Clifford Obby Odimegwu, PhD - University of the Witwatersrand - Prof

Professor Clifford Obby Odimegwu

PhD

Introduction

Clifford Odimegwu is a full professor of demography, social statistics and population health, and founding director of Graduate Programme in Demography and Population Studies, at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. He holds a doctoral degree in Demography and Social Statistics of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria and Advanced Certificate in Population and International Health of Harvard School of Public Health. His expertise covers the field of technical demography, epidemiology, population health, sociology and social statistics. As at today, he has 26 years of experience as a University Lecturer, Research analyst and Synthesist investigating threats and risks to health in specific population groups. He has published over 160 papers in credible national and international peer-reviewed journals. Most of his publications can be found in the world-wide Researchgate platform and is widely cited. He has experience in using mix method approaches in conceptualizing, designing, implementing and managing major research projects.

He supervises, provides guidance to and supports epidemiology, biostatistics, demography and social science Ph.D students at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. He has supervised 16 PhD students to completion, more than 45 Masters Students and close to 100 honors students.. He has also supervised twelve postdoctoral fellows.

Consulting for major international organizations such as UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, EU & major US agencies, he has monitored and evaluated a number of projects in such countries as Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Swaziland, USA etc. He has coedited two books, “Continuity and Change in African Demography and Social Demography of South Africa: Advances and Emerging Issues”, under Taylor and Francis New York stable. He is an assistant editor of African Journal of Reproductive Health since 2000, and the Editor-in-Chief of African Population Studies Journal since 2006.

Prof Odimegwu’s current intellectual projects include authorship of two books, ‘Demography, Development and Democracy in Africa’ and ‘Family Demography and Post-2015 Development Agenda in Africa’, to be published by Springer Publishing Netherland. Prof Odimegwu is a passionate advocate of building the capacity of next generation of Nigerian/African scholars who will take over from the retiring generation. He is spearheading the development of a unique, different and internationally comparable curriculum in demographic training in Northern Nigeria as a Visiting Professor in the department of Demography and Social Statistics, Federal University of Birnin-Kebbi, Nigeria and a Visiting Professor in Population Geography of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka.




Primary Affiliation: University of the Witwatersrand - JOHANNESBURG, GAUTENG , South Africa

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Professor Clifford Obby Odimegwu’s Resume / CV

Education

Jul 2003
Harvard School of Public Health
Adv. Cert in International Health
Population and International Health
Jul 2003
Harvard School of Public Health
Adv. Cert in International Health
Population and International Health
Sep 2001 - Aug 2002
Harvard School of Public Health
Adv. Cert
Takemi Program in International Health
Jul 1995
Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
PhD
Demography and Social Statistics
Aug 1989
Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
M.Sc
Demography and Social Statistics
Aug 1987
Imo State University, Nigeria
B.Sc
Sociology

Experience

Jun 2018
International Consultant
Team Leader, UNFPA/SIERRA LEONE 6TH COUNTRY PROGRAMME
M and E of UNFPA Country Programme interventions
Nov 2017
International Consultant
Team Leader, UNFPA/MALAWI 7TH COUNTRY PROGRAMME
Team Leader, UNFPA CPE
Aug 1993 - Dec 2015
University of the Witwatersrand
Full Professor
Demography and Population Studies Programme
Oct 2004
Full Professor
Professor
Demography, Social Statistics and Population Health at Wits University
Jun 2003
Senior Lecturer
Senior Lecturer
Demography
Jun 2003
Associate Professor
Ass. Professor
Demography
Sep 1998
Senior Lecturer
Senior Lecturer
Demography at Ife University

Publications

57Publications

2189Reads

383Profile Views

182PubMed Central Citations

HIV voluntary counselling and testing and behaviour changes among youths in Nigeria.

J Biosoc Sci 2020 May 14;52(3):366-381. Epub 2019 Aug 14.

Demography and Social Statistics, Covenant University, Ogun State, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932019000506DOI Listing
May 2020
3 Reads

How Much Do They Know? An Analysis of the Accuracy of HIV Knowledge among Youth Affected by HIV in South Africa.

J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care 2019 Jan-Dec;18:2325958218822306

1 Demography and Population Studies, Schools of Social Sciences and Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

HIV/AIDS prevalence rates in South Africa are among the highest in the world. The key to reducing transmission is the dissemination of accurate knowledge. Here, we investigate the accuracy of HIV/AIDS knowledge among youth affected by the disease. Data from the Fourth South African National HIV, Behaviour and Health Survey (2012) are used and a weighted sample of 4 095 447 youth (15-24 years old) who have known or cared for someone with HIV/AIDS are analyzed. Results show that more than one-third (40.37%) of youth in South Africa are affected by the disease. One-quarter of the affected youth have 75% accurate knowledge of the virus, while only 10% have 100% accurate knowledge. Rural place of residence (odds ratio [OR] = 0.61) and looking for work (OR = 0.39) are less likely to have accurate knowledge. Youth without disabilities (OR = 2.46), in cohabiting (OR = 1.69), and in dating (OR = 1.70) relationships are more likely to have accurate knowledge. In conclusion, in order to reduce HIV incidence and combat HIV myths, efforts to improve the accuracy of HIV knowledge among youth affected by the disease are needed. There should be more community-based campaigns to target unemployed youth in the country.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325958218822306DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6748550PMC
April 2020
82 Reads

Patterns of delivery assistance among adolescent mothers in Nigeria.

Midwifery 2020 Mar 28;82:102619. Epub 2019 Dec 28.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2019.102619DOI Listing
March 2020
1.707 Impact Factor

How soon do single mothers have another child? A competing risk analysis of second premarital childbearing in sub-Saharan African countries.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2020 Mar 29;20(1):185. Epub 2020 Mar 29.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-2850-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7104531PMC
March 2020
2.190 Impact Factor

Contraceptive Use in Nigeria: Does Social Context Matter?

Afr J Reprod Health 2020 Mar;24(1):133-142

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.29063/ajrh2020/v24i1.14DOI Listing
March 2020

Contraceptive use in Eswatini: do contextual influences matter?

J Biosoc Sci 2020 Jan 13:1-18. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Social Sciences and Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932019000889DOI Listing
January 2020

Trends and gender differences in age at sex debut among adolescents and young adults in urban Cape Area, South Africa.

Afr Health Sci 2019 Dec;19(4):2964-2972

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v19i4.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7040320PMC
December 2019
0.662 Impact Factor

A comparative analysis of disability measures in Cameroonian surveys.

Popul Health Metr 2019 12 5;17(1):16. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Demography and Population Studies, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Background: Although identifying vulnerable groups is an important step in shaping appropriate and efficient policies for targeting populations of disabled people, it remains a challenge. This study aims to evaluate for the first time the comparability of the different disability measurements used in Cameroon. This is done by comparing them with the international standards proposed by the Washington Group (WG). It also evaluates the consistency of the association between the disability as measured by these surveys and the sociodemographic characteristics.

Method: We used data from the third Cameroonian Population and Housing Census (3RGPH) of 2005, the third Cameroonian Household survey (ECAM3) of 2007, the Demographic Health and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (DHS-MICS) of 2011 and a survey conducted on adults in Yaoundé (HandiVIH) in 2015 with the WG tool. The proportion and their confidence intervals, chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regressions are used for analyses.

Results: In the city of Yaoundé and for the 15-49 age group, disability prevalence was estimated at 3.6% (CI = [2.5, 5.1]), 2.7% CI = [2.1, 3.5]), 2.6% (CI = [2.4, 2.7]) and 1.0% (CI = [1.0, 1.10]), according to DHS-MICS, ECAM3, HandiVIH and 3RGPH, respectively. The prevalence of severe motor and mental disabilities in DHS-MICS (0.4% CI = [0.2, 0.8], 1.1% CI = [0.7, 1.8] and 0.5% CI = [0.2, 1.1], respectively) are not significantly different from the findings of HandiVIH (0.3% CI = [0.2, 0.3], 0.8% CI = [0.7, 0.9] and 0.5% CI = [0.5, 0.6], respectively). Only motor disability prevalence in ECAM3 (0.8%, CI = [0.5, 1.2]) is not different from that of HandiVIH. When the WG screening tool is used in HandiVIH, disability is positively associated with age, negatively associated with educational level, being in a union and socioeconomic status (SES) and it is not associated with sex. Severe disability, for its part, is not associated with SES and is positively associated with being a male. A different association trend is observed with 3RGPH, ECAM3 and DHS-MICS.

Conclusion: None of the instruments used in the nationally representative Cameroonian surveys produced both disability prevalence and association trends that are exactly similar to those obtained when using the WG disability screening tool, thus highlighting the necessity to include the WG questions in nationally representative surveys.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12963-019-0198-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6896774PMC
December 2019

Adult mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: cross-sectional study of causes of death in Zambia.

Trop Med Int Health 2019 10 11;24(10):1208-1220. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

School of Social Sciences, Centre for the Study of Regional Development, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tmi.13302DOI Listing
October 2019
4 Reads
2.329 Impact Factor

Socioeconomic Determinants of Knowledge of Kidney Disease Among Residents in Nigerian Communities in Lagos State, Nigeria.

Oman Med J 2019 Sep;34(5):444-455

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Objectives: We sought to estimate the knowledge, sociodemographic determinants, and risk-inducing lifestyles of kidney disease (KD) among Nigerians living in Lagos State.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study to assess the level of knowledge of KD and its associated sociodemographic factors of individuals living in urban and semi-urban communities of Lagos State, Nigeria. It is hoped that the results of this study will help to inform preventive modalities. We used a pretested, structured questionnaire to draw information from 1171 Nigerians aged ? 15 years.

Results: The mean age of respondents was 33.5±11.1 years. In our cohort, 72.4% of respondents were knowledgeable of KD, with media as their major source of information (41.6%). Knowledge of KD was significantly associated with age ( 0.044), education ( < 0.001), marital status ( < 0.001), and place of residence ( 0.048). The established KD risk-inducing lifestyle factors were habitual use of herbal supplements, significant alcohol consumption, and diabetes ( < 0.050). Significant predictors of knowledge of KD included primary education (Odds ratio (OR) = 0.367, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.11-1.22; =0.102), secondary education (OR = 0.296, 95% CI: 0.17-0.51; < 0.001), Igbo ethnic group (OR = 1.471, 95% CI: 0.99-2.17; 0.047), and place of residence (OR = 1.332, 95% CI: 1.00-1.77; 0.048). Age 30-39 years (OR = 0.749, 95% CI: 0.48-1.18; 0.214), 40-49 years (OR = 1.083, 95% CI: 0.69-1.69; 0.727), and not working (OR = 1.178, 95% CI: 0.88-1.57; < 0.269) were non-significant predictors of knowledge of KD.

Conclusions: Our cohort had inadequate knowledge of linking risk-inducing lifestyles to KD development. Effective measures and efforts should be made to create awareness and educate the general population on KD and prevention measures related to risk-inducing lifestyles to reduce the burden of KD among Nigerians.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5001/omj.2019.81DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6745423PMC
September 2019

The Proximate Determinants of Fertility in Eswatini.

Afr J Reprod Health 2019 Jun;23(2):65-75

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Social Sciences and Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.29063/ajrh2019/v23i2.7DOI Listing
June 2019
5 Reads

Does Female Autonomy Affect Contraceptive Use among Women in Northern Nigeria?

Afr J Reprod Health 2019 Jun;23(2):92-100

Demography and Population Studies Program, School of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.29063/ajrh2019/v23i2.9DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

Household relationships and healthcare seeking behaviour for common childhood illnesses in sub-Saharan Africa: a cross-national mixed effects analysis.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 May 14;19(1):308. Epub 2019 May 14.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Background: Intra-household dynamics play crucial roles in utilisation of healthcare services for children. We investigated the influence of household relationships on healthcare seeking behaviour for common childhood illnesses in four sub-Sahara African regions.

Methods: Data on 247,061 under-five children were extracted from recent Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 in 25 countries. Data were combined and analysed per sub-region. Dependent variables (DVs) were uptake of health facility care for diarrhea and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARI) symptoms. The main independent variable (IV) was household relationship which was represented by maternal marital profile (marital status, family type and number of marriages) and maternal relationship to household head. Mixed effects logit models were fitted to assess independent relationship between the IVs and DVs with adjustment for relevant demographic and socio-economic characteristics at 5% significance level.

Results: The percentage of children who received care for diarrhea and ARI symptoms from health facilities across sub-regions was: Western Africa (WA) 42.4, 44.1%; Central Africa (CA) 32.6, 33.9%; Eastern Africa (EA) 41.5, 48.7% and Southern Africa (SA) 58.9, 62.7%. Maternal marital profile was not associated with healthcare seeking behaviour for diarrhea and ARI symptoms in any of the sub-regions. Children whose mothers were daughter/daughter-in-law to household head were significantly less likely to be taken to health facility for diarrhea treatment in Eastern Africa (AOR?=?0.81, CI: 0.51-0.95). Having a mother who is the head of household was significantly associated with higher odds of facility care for ARI symptoms for children from Western (AOR?=?1.20, CI: 1.02-1.43) and Southern Africa (AOR?=?1.49, CI: 1.20-1.85).

Conclusion: The type of relationship between mother of under-fives and head of households affect health seeking behaviour for treatment of diarrhea and ARI symptoms in Eastern, Western and Southern Africa. Countries in these regions need to adapt best practices for promoting healthcare utilisation for children such that household relationship does not constitute barriers.

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https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4142-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6518738PMC
May 2019
30 Reads
1.659 Impact Factor

Does education offset the effect of maternal disadvantage on childhood anaemia in Tanzania? Evidence from a nationally representative cross-sectional study.

BMC Pediatr 2019 04 3;19(1):89. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Social Sciences and Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Background: Despite being preventable, anaemia is a major public health problem that affects a sizable number of children under-five years globally and in Tanzania. This study examined the maternal factors associated with the risk of anaemia among under-five children in Tanzania. We also assessed whether higher maternal education could reduce the risks of anaemia among children of women with poor socio-economic status.

Methods: Data was drawn from the 2015-16 Tanzania demographic and health survey and malaria indicator survey for 7916 children under five years. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated by fitting a proportional odds model to examine the maternal risk factors of anaemia. Stratified analysis was done to examine how the relationship differed across maternal educational levels.

Results: The findings revealed that maternal disadvantage evident in young motherhood [AOR:1.43, 95%CI:1.16-1.75], no formal education [AOR:1.53, 95%CI:1.25-1.89], unemployment [AOR:1.31, 95%CI:1.15-1.49], poorest household wealth [AOR:1.50, 95%CI:1.17-1.91], and non-access to health insurance [AOR:1.26, 95%CI: 1.03-1.53] were risk factors of anaemia among children in the sample. Sub-group analysis by maternal education showed that the risks were not evident when the mother has secondary or higher education. However, having an unmarried mother was associated with about four-times higher risk of anaemia if the mother is uneducated [AOR:4.04, 95%CI:1.98-8.24] compared with if the mother is currently in union.

Conclusion: Findings from this study show that a secondary or higher maternal education may help reduce the socio-economic risk factors of anaemia among children under-5 years in Tanzania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-019-1465-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6446256PMC
April 2019
19 Reads
1.918 Impact Factor

The protective role of family structure for adolescent development in sub-Saharan Africa.

PLoS One 2018 29;13(10):e0206197. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, Faculties of Health Sciences and Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Several studies have focused on the risk factors associated with adolescent developmental outcomes, but the literature on the role of protective factors at the family and community level for positive adolescent development is scarce, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We hypothesize that ensuring a supportive environment for adolescents may result in delayed sexual debut for adolescents in SSA. The relationship between family structure and positive adolescent sexual behaviour, measured as delay in sexual debut, was examined using the bioecological theory framed by a risk and resilience perspective. We used nationally representative data on female and male adolescents (aged 15-17 years) from 12 countries in SSA. We modelled logistic regressions to test for associations between family structure and delayed sexual debut while controlling for other covariates in SSA. The majority (90%) of the young adults delayed sexual debut, and this delay varied by family structure. After controlling for other covariates, adolescents living with neither parent had lower odds of delaying sexual debut although results were only significant for males. Interaction terms with community socio-economic status showed an interaction between community education and males living with neither parent. Future studies must investigate the gender differentials in the relationship between family structure and delayed sexual debut among adolescents in SSA.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0206197PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6205637PMC
March 2019
85 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN POSITIVE SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR AMONG YOUTH IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA.

J Biosoc Sci 2019 03 10;51(2):254-272. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Demography and Population Studies Programme,Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg,South Africa.

SummaryThe question of youth sexual behaviour has been widely debated, with researchers such as Berhan and Berhan (2015) arguing that young adults aged 15-24 are more likely to engage in risky behaviours. However, research has not adequately addressed the issue of positive sexual behaviours, in particular among young people in sub-Saharan Africa. Adapting the compensatory model of risk and resiliency theory, this study examined the determinants of positive sexual behaviours among youth in sub-Saharan Africa. Using recent data from Demographic and Health Surveys of sixteen countries representative of each African region (East, West, Southern and Central), it was hypothesized that positive sexual behaviours of youth (condom use at last sex and single sexual partnership) would be most strengthened by protective factors at the individual and family levels, and that these behaviours would differ by region due to regional variation in socio-cultural practices. Delayed age at sexual debut (first sex after the age of 15) was found to be the strongest protective factor for positive sexual behaviours among males and females in sub-Saharan Africa. Certain socioeconomic variables were found to be positively associated with positive sexual behaviours and the associations differed by gender.

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https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S002193201
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S002193201800010XDOI Listing
March 2019
64 Reads

A unique opportunity to use football to improve birth registration awareness and completeness in Nigeria.

Br J Sports Med 2018 Dec 28;52(23):1529-1530. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.


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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-097404DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6241617PMC
December 2018
73 Reads
5.025 Impact Factor

Fertility, Family Size Preference and Contraceptive Use in Sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2014.

Afr J Reprod Health 2018 Dec;22(4):44-53

Demography and Population Studies, Schools of Social Sciences and Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

In view of an unusual transition in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) fertility, periodic re-appraisal is necessary. Using an ecological design, data from Demographic and Health Surveys between 1990 and 2014 were analysed to investigate trends in completed family size (CFS), total fertility rate (TFR), family size preference (FSP), and contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR). The correlates of changes in fertility levels, FSP and CPR were explored. Results showed that CFS declined and was lowest in Southern and Western Africa. However, average CFS for Central African countries appeared virtually the same over the period. Changes in TFR and FSP followed patterns similar to CFS. Western and Central region had very slow increase in CPR with many below 20% as at 2014. Eastern and Southern Africa had faster increase in CPR with some countries achieving almost 60%. Regression results showed that contraceptive prevalence (?= -1.96, p=0.027) and median age at first marriage (?= -0.23, p=0.06) were negatively related to TFR while employment (?= -21.7, p <0.001) was negatively related to FSP. In summary, fertility levels and family size preference declined while contraceptive use improved particularly in Southern and the Eastern Africa. Increased female labour force participation is another potential route to fertility decline in SSA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.29063/ajrh2018/v22i4.5DOI Listing
December 2018
72 Reads

Intimate partner violence and current modern contraceptive use among married women in Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

Pan Afr Med J 2018 30;30:85. Epub 2018 May 30.

Demography and Population Studies, Schools of Social Sciences and Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Introduction: This paper examined the relationship between Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and current modern contraceptive use (MCU) among married women in Uganda.

Methods: We used the 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS) data, selecting a weighted sample of 1,307 married women from the domestic violence module. Chi-squared tests and multivariate complementary log-log (clog-log) regressions were used to examine the relationship between IPV and current MCU, controlling for women's socio-demographic factors.

Results: Significant predictors of current MCU (25.3%) among married women were: women's reported ability to ask a partner to use a condom, number of living children and wealth index. The odds of current MCU were higher among women who could ask their partners to use a condom (aOR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.26-2.78), had more than one child (aOR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.07,3.93) and were from better wealth indices for example the richest (aOR = 2.52, 95% CI: 1.25-5.08). IPV was not associated with current MCU independently and after adjusting for women's socio-demographic factors.

Conclusion: In Uganda's context, IPV was not associated with current MCU. Interventions to promote MCU should enhance women's capacity to negotiate MCU within union and target women of lower socio-economic status.

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http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/30/85/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2018.30.85.12722DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6191265PMC
October 2018
102 Reads

Decomposition of age- and cause-specific adult mortality contributions to the gender gap in life expectancy from census and survey data in Zambia.

SSM Popul Health 2018 Aug 23;5:218-226. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Demography and Population Studies, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of Witwatersrand, WITS, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa.

In the context of high adult mortality and an immense impact on the health burden of Zambia, a decomposition analysis of age- and cause-specific mortality in age group 15-59 was performed to determine the contributions to the gap in life expectancy at birth between males and females. Previous studies on decomposition have examined income groups, ethnicity, and regional differences' contributions to gaps in life expectancy, but not the adult mortality age group 15-59. These studies focus on developed countries and few on developing countries. Arriaga's decomposition method was applied to 2010 census and 2010-2012 sample vital registration with verbal autopsy survey (SAVVY) data to decompose contributions of age- and cause-specific adult mortality to the gap in life expectancy at birth between males and females. The decomposition analysis revealed that mortality was higher among males than females and concentrated in age groups 20-49. Age- and cause-specific adult mortality contributed positively, 50% of the years to the gap in life expectancy at birth between males and females. Major cause-specific mortality contributors to the gap in life expectancy were infectious and parasitic diseases (1.17 years, 26.3%), accidents and injuries (0.54 years, 12.2%), suicide and violence (0.30 years, 6.8%). Female HIV mortality offset male mortality. Neoplasms deaths among females contributed negatively to the gap in life expectancy (-0.22 years, -5.4%). Accidents, injuries, suicide, and violence are emerging major causes of death in age group 20-49 in Zambia which health policy and programmes should target.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ssmph.2018.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6077128PMC
August 2018
42 Reads

Adult mortality in sub-Saharan Africa using 2001-2009 census data: does estimation method matter?

Genus 2018 1;74(1):10. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Demography and Population Studies, School of Public Health and Social Sciences Faculty of Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2000 South Africa.

Adult mortality is an important development and public health issue that continues to attract the attention of demographers and public health researchers. Controversies exist about the accurate level of adult mortality in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), due to different data sources and errors in data collection. To address this shortcoming, methods have been developed to accurately estimate levels of adult mortality. Using three different methods (orphanhood, widowhood, and siblinghood) of indirect estimation and the direct siblinghood method of adult mortality, we examined the levels of adult mortality in 10 countries in SSA using 2001-2009 census and survey data. Results from the different methods vary. Estimates from the orphanhood data show that adult mortality rates for males are in decline in South Africa and West African countries, whilst there is an increase in adult mortality in the East African countries, for the period examined. The widowhood estimates were the lowest and reveal a marked increase in female adult mortality rates compared to male. A notable difference was observed in adult mortality estimates derived from the direct and indirect siblinghood methods. The method of estimation, therefore, matters in establishing the level of adult mortality in SSA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41118-017-0025-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6097801PMC
August 2018
44 Reads

Ethnic heterogeneity in the determinants of HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination among Nigeria women.

BMC Public Health 2018 06 19;18(1):763. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Demography and Population Studies Program, School of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Background: Stigma and discrimination remains a barrier to uptake of HIV/AIDS counselling and treatment as well as effective HIV reduction programmes. Despite ethnic diversity of Nigeria, studies on determinants of HIV stigma incorporating the ethnic dimension are very few. This paper provides empirical explanation of the ethnic dimension of determinant of HIV stigma and discrimination in Nigeria.

Methods: Nationally representative data from Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey 2013 (Individual recode) was analysed to explore ethnic differentials and homogeneity in the determinants of HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination among women in multi-ethnic Nigeria.

Results: Result shows that determinants of HIV stigma and discrimination varies by ethnicity in Nigeria. Significant ethnic differentials in HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination by Secondary school education exist among Hausa and Igbo respectively (OR = 0.79; CI: 1.49-2.28 and OR=1.62; CI: 1.18-2.23, p<0.05). Wealth status significantly influenced HIIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination among Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba ethnic groups (p<0.05). Knowledge of HIV/AIDS was significantly associated with lower odds of discriminating attitudes among the Hausa and Fulani ethnic groups (OR = 0.45; CI: 0.30-0.67 and OR=0.36; CI: 0.16-0.83, p<0.05).

Conclusions: Identifying ethnic differential and homogeneity in predictors of HIV/AIDS stigma is key to reducing HIV/AIDS prevalence in Nigeria and countries with similar settings.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5668-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6006838PMC
June 2018
12 Reads
2.264 Impact Factor

Social cohesion and self-rated health among adults in South Africa: The moderating role of race.

Health Place 2018 05 23;51:89-96. Epub 2018 Mar 23.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Science, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.


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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2018.02.010DOI Listing
May 2018
9 Reads
2.805 Impact Factor

The relation of female circumcision to sexual behavior in Kenya and Nigeria.

Women Health 2017 08 29;57(7):757-774. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

a Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences , University of the Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.

One of the reasons for the perpetuation of female circumcision is that it controls female sexuality. In this study, the authors examined the relationship between female circumcision and the sexual behavior of women in Kenya and Nigeria. Data on women who were aware of circumcision and were circumcised were extracted from the Kenya Demographic and Health Survey of 2008-09 as well as the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey of 2008. The sample size was 7,344 for Kenya and 16,294 for Nigeria. The outcome variables were age at first intercourse and total lifetime number of sexual partners. The study hypothesis was that women who were circumcised were less likely to have initiated sex early and to have only one sex partner. Cox proportional hazards regression and Poisson regression were used to examine the relations of female circumcision and other selected variables to sexual behavior. No association was observed between female circumcision and the outcomes for sexual behavior of women in Kenya and Nigeria. The argument of sexual chastity is insufficient to sustain the perpetuation of female circumcision.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2016.1206054DOI Listing
August 2017
47 Reads

MATERNAL HEALTH-SEEKING BEHAVIOUR AND UNDER-FIVE MORTALITY IN ZIMBABWE.

J Biosoc Sci 2017 05 21;49(3):408-421. Epub 2016 Jun 21.

Demography and Population Studies Programme,Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg,South Africa.

Under-five mortality remains a major public health challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. Zimbabwe is one of the countries in the region that failed to achieve Millennium Developmental Goal 4 in 2015. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which maternal health-seeking behaviour prior to and during pregnancy and post-delivery influences the likelihood of under-five mortality among Zimbabwean children. The study was cross-sectional and data were extracted from the 2010/11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS). The study sample comprised 5155 children who were born five years preceding the 2010/11 ZDHS to a sample of 4128 women of reproductive age (15-49 years). Cox Proportional Hazard regression modelling was used to examine the relationship between maternal health-seeking behaviour and under-five mortality. The results showed that maternal health-seeking behaviour factors are associated with the risk of dying during childhood. Children born to mothers who had ever used contraceptives (HR: 0.38, CI 0.28-0.51) had a lower risk of dying during childhood compared with children born to mothers who had never used any contraceptive method. The risk of under-five mortality among children who had a postnatal check-up within two months after birth (HR: 0.36, CI 0.23-0.56) was lower than that of children who did not receive postnatal care. Small birth size (HR: 1.70, CI 1.20-2.41) and higher birth order (2+) increased the risk of under-five mortality. Good maternal health-seeking behaviour practices at the three critical stages around childbirth have the potential to reduce under-five mortality. Therefore, public health programmes should focus on influencing health-seeking behaviour among women and removing obstacles to effective maternal health-seeking behaviour in Zimbabwe.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932016000298DOI Listing
May 2017
50 Reads

Women at risk: Gender inequality and maternal health.

Women Health 2017 04 25;57(4):405-429. Epub 2016 Mar 25.

a Demography and Population Studies Programme , Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2016.1170092DOI Listing
April 2017
76 Reads
1 Citation

Household structure, maternal characteristics and childhood mortality in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

Rural Remote Health 2016 Apr-Jun;16(2):3737. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Johannesburg, South Africa.

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January 2017
47 Reads
2 Citations
0.870 Impact Factor

Independent and combined effects of maternal smoking and solid fuel on infant and child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa.

Trop Med Int Health 2016 12 29;21(12):1572-1582. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12779DOI Listing
December 2016
50 Reads
1 Citation
2.330 Impact Factor

Risky sexual behaviour among women: Does economic empowerment matter? Case of Gabon, Mozambique, Sierra-Leone and Zambia.

Afr J AIDS Res 2016 Dec;15(4):333-340

a Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences , University of the Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16085906.2016.1238401DOI Listing
December 2016
55 Reads
0.610 Impact Factor

The Influence of Infant Feeding Practices on Infant Mortality in Southern Africa.

Matern Child Health J 2016 10;20(10):2130-41

Demography and Population Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-016-2033-xDOI Listing
October 2016
50 Reads
1 Citation

Access to mass media messages, and use of family planning in Nigeria: a spatio-demographic analysis from the 2013 DHS.

BMC Public Health 2016 05 24;16:427. Epub 2016 May 24.

Department of Mass Communication, University of Nigeria Nsukka, Nsukka, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-2979-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4877816PMC
May 2016
21 Reads
1 Citation
2.264 Impact Factor

Baby factories taint surrogacy in Nigeria.

Reprod Biomed Online 2016 Jan 20;32(1):6-8. Epub 2015 Oct 20.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2015.10.001DOI Listing
January 2016
270 Reads
3.020 Impact Factor

Ethnic differentials in under-five mortality in Nigeria.

Ethn Health 2015 5;20(2):145-62. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

a Programme in Demography and Population Studies , University of the Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2014.890599DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337727PMC
September 2015
44 Reads
9 Citations
1.280 Impact Factor

Factors influencing the usage of different types of malaria prevention methods during pregnancy in Kenya.

Afr Health Sci 2015 Jun;15(2):413-9

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa ; Department of Sociology and Social Administration, Kyambogo University, Uganda.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v15i2.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4480458PMC
June 2015
40 Reads
5 Citations
0.662 Impact Factor

Youth mortality due to HIV/AIDS in South Africa, 2001-2009: an analysis of the levels of mortality using life table techniques.

Afr J AIDS Res 2014 ;13(1):13-20

a Demography and Population Studies , University of the Witwatersrand , 1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Braamfontein , Johannesburg , Gauteng 2050 , South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16085906.2014.886605DOI Listing
March 2015
35 Reads
5 Citations
0.610 Impact Factor

REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY IN NIGERIA: A MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS.

J Biosoc Sci 2015 Mar 10;47(2):165-87. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

*Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg,South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932013000734DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4501304PMC
March 2015
36 Reads
18 Citations

Unmet need for family planning: implication for under-five mortality in Nigeria.

J Health Popul Nutr 2015 Mar;33(1):187-206

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4438662PMC
March 2015
50 Reads
1 Citation
1.390 Impact Factor

Wealth and under-nourishment among married women in two impoverished nations: evidence from Burkina Faso and Congo Democratic Republic.

BMC Res Notes 2015 Feb 8;8:34. Epub 2015 Feb 8.

Department of Population studies and Demography, University of Witswatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-015-1001-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4331373PMC
February 2015
28 Reads

Determinants of Maternal Health Care Utilization in Nigeria: a multilevel approach.

Pan Afr Med J 2014 18;17 Suppl 1. Epub 2014 Jan 18.

Demography and Population Studies Programme University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11694/pamj.supp.2014.17.1.3596DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3958146PMC
November 2014
34 Reads
26 Citations

Health effects of single motherhood on children in sub-Saharan Africa: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Public Health 2014 Nov 5;14:1145. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-1145DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4242492PMC
November 2014
31 Reads
6 Citations
2.264 Impact Factor

Barriers to accessing health care in Nigeria: implications for child survival.

Glob Health Action 2014 14;7:23499. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3957799PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v7.23499DOI Listing
October 2014
37 Reads
15 Citations
1.650 Impact Factor

The social context of adolescent women's use of modern contraceptives in Zimbabwe: a multilevel analysis.

Reprod Health 2014 Aug 10;11:64. Epub 2014 Aug 10.

Department of Population Studies, University of Botswana, Private Bag UB0022, Gaborone, Botswana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1742-4755-11-64DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4134336PMC
August 2014
58 Reads
6 Citations
1.620 Impact Factor

Spousal violence in sub-Saharan Africa: does household poverty-wealth matter?

Reprod Health 2014 Jun 17;11:45. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1742-4755-11-45DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4076508PMC
June 2014
12 Reads
4 Citations
1.620 Impact Factor

Variations in unmet need for contraception in Zambia: does ethnicity play a role?

J Biosoc Sci 2014 May 19;46(3):294-315. Epub 2013 Jul 19.

* Demography and Population Studies Programme, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932013000357DOI Listing
May 2014
22 Reads
4 Citations

Does it really matter where women live? A multilevel analysis of the determinants of postnatal care in Nigeria.

Matern Child Health J 2014 May;18(4):950-9

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-013-1323-9DOI Listing
May 2014
40 Reads
8 Citations

Contextual determinants of maternal health care service utilization in Nigeria.

Women Health 2013 ;53(7):647-68

a Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria, and Demography and Population Studies Programme , University of the Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2013.826319DOI Listing
December 2013
46 Reads
11 Citations

Do family structure and poverty affect sexual risk behaviors of undergraduate students in Nigeria?

Afr J Reprod Health 2013 Dec;17(4):137-49

Demography and Social Statistics Department, Faculty of Social Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

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December 2013
35 Reads

The cost of being a man: social and health consequences of Igbo masculinity.

Cult Health Sex 2013 4;15(2):219-34. Epub 2012 Dec 4.

Demography and Population Studies Programme, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2012.747700DOI Listing
June 2013
35 Reads
4 Citations

HIV/AIDS stigma and utilization of voluntary counselling and testing in Nigeria.

BMC Public Health 2013 May 13;13:465. Epub 2013 May 13.

Program in Demography and Population Studies, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-465DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662628PMC
May 2013
41 Reads
7 Citations
2.264 Impact Factor

The association between socioeconomic status and adult mortality in rural kwazulu-natal, South Africa.

Oman Med J 2013 Mar;28(2):102-7

Department of Population-Based Field Epidemiology, School of Public Health University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5001/omj.2013.27DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3628190PMC
March 2013
48 Reads
3 Citations

Regional patterns and correlates of HIV voluntary counselling and testing among youths in Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2011 Jun;15(2):131-46

Dept of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

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June 2011
37 Reads
5 Citations

Men's role in emergency obstetric care in Osun State of Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2005 Dec;9(3):59-71

School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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December 2005
40 Reads
13 Citations

Influence of religion on adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviour among Nigerian university students: affiliation or commitment?

Afr J Reprod Health 2005 Aug;9(2):125-40

Population Sciences Training and Research Programme, Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

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August 2005
27 Reads
8 Citations

Sexual behaviour of Nigerian university students.

J Child Adolesc Ment Health 2005 Jan;17(1):35-8

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/17280580509486591DOI Listing
January 2005
34 Reads

Prevalence, patterns and correlates of domestic violence in selected Igbo communities of Imo State, Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2002 Aug;6(2):101-14

Department of Demography and Social Statistics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

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August 2002
36 Reads
13 Citations

Parental characteristics and adolescent sexual behaviour in Bida Local Government Area of Niger State, Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2002 Apr;6(1):95-106

Takemi Program in International Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Bld 1-1104, Boston, MA 02115-6086, USA.

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April 2002
27 Reads
5 Citations

Top co-authors

Joshua O Akinyemi
Joshua O Akinyemi

College of Medicine

9
Sunday A Adedini
Sunday A Adedini

University of the Witwatersrand

8
Vesper H Chisumpa
Vesper H Chisumpa

University of the Witwatersrand

6
Dorothy N Ononokpono
Dorothy N Ononokpono

University of the Witwatersrand

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Oluwaseyi Dolapo Somefun
Oluwaseyi Dolapo Somefun

Schools of Public Health and Social Sciences

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Emmanuel O Olamijuwon
Emmanuel O Olamijuwon

Schools of Public Health and Social Science

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Sunday Adedini
Sunday Adedini

University of the Witwatersrand

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