Publications by authors named "Claudio Pigoli"

5 Publications

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Chylopericardium Effusion in a Lac Alaotra Bamboo Lemur ().

Animals (Basel) 2021 Feb 19;11(2). Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Department of Veterinary Medicine, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Milan, 26900 Lodi, Italy.

An 11-year-old female was evaluated following a history of dyspnea of 15 days' duration. Thoracic radiography performed by the referring veterinarian revealed a large cardiac silhouette and dorsal deviation of the trachea. Heart sounds were muffled. Echocardiographic findings were indicative of severe pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. No pleural effusion was identified. A computed tomography (CT) exam confirmed the presence of severe pericardial effusion and allowed identification of a parenchymatous mediastinal lesion sited at the level of the left hemithorax. To delineate the thoracic duct, lymphoCT was also performed by injection of iodinated contrast medium in the perianal subcutaneous tissue. Pericardiocentesis yielded a considerable amount of effusion with chylous biochemical and cytological properties. A diagnosis of chylopericardium with absence of pleural effusion was made. Initially, the chylopericardium was managed conservatively with two centesis and oral treatment with prednisolone. Medical treatment did not result in complete resolution of effusion and clinical signs; therefore, subtotal pericardiectomy and thoracic duct ligation were recommended. After the second pericardiocentesis, the subject died and the pericardiectomy could not be performed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the development of chylopericardium in a .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani11020536DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7922474PMC
February 2021

Acute lameness in a cat with disseminated mycobacteriosis.

Vet Ital 2020 07 14;56(3):199-204. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna, Via Antonio Bianchi 7/9, 25124 Brescia, Italy.

Mycobacterium avium infection was diagnosed in an adult cat showing acute lameness of the right hind limb, enlargement of the right popliteal lymph node and two cutaneous nodular lesions of the right chest wall. Conventional radiography of the proximal tibia showed a proliferative osteolytic lesion. Cytological examination of the right popliteal lymph node and the nodular skin lesions fine needle aspiration smears, demonstrated granulomatous inflammation with many negative staining bacilli within macrophages or in smears background. The diagnosis was confirmed by Ziehl‑Neelsen staining of the smears and the identification of mycobacteria was performed by microbiological and molecular methods. Histopathology performed after the necropsy revealed disseminated mycobacteriosis with granulomatous mesenteric lymphadenitis, granulomatous pneumonia, hepatitis and tibial osteomyelitis. M. avium is a well‑known agent of gastro‑enteric, respiratory or disseminated disease in immunocompromised cats but there are few cases reported in literature of bone involvement in systemic mycobacteriosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12834/VetIt.2017.10870.1DOI Listing
July 2020

Paratuberculosis in Captive Scimitar-Horned Oryxes ().

Animals (Basel) 2020 Oct 23;10(11). Epub 2020 Oct 23.

National Reference Centre for Paratuberculosis, Sede Territoriale di Piacenza, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna (IZSLER), Strada Faggiola 1, 29027 Gariga di Podenzano, Italy.

Paratuberculosis, a chronic disease caused by subsp. (MAP), in ten scimitar-horned oryxes (SHOs) hosted in an Italian zoological park and originating from a Slovakian flock, was documented by pathology, molecular, cultural, and serological testing. The infection origin in this threatened species was also investigated by genomic analyses. Following the death of six of the 10 SHOs, serial investigations of dead and alive animals were performed. Necropsy, carried out on five out of six animals, identified intestinal thickening and mesenteric lymphadenomegaly in one of the animals. Histopathology (5/6) revealed lepromatous (2/5) and tuberculoid (2/5) intestinal forms or lack of lesions (1/5). Ziehl-Neelsen and immunohistochemistry stains identified two multibacillary, two paucibacillary forms, and one negative case. MAP was identified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in tissue samples in five out of five SHOs and was microbiologically isolated from two of the three animals whose fresh tissue samples were available. Fecal samples were collected in four of the six dead animals: all four resulted positive to qPCR and in MAP was isolated in three. ELISA identified MAP-specific antibodies in three of the five dead animals whose serum was available. qPCR identified MAP in the freshly deposited feces of two out of the four alive animals. From the feces of these two animals, MAP was microbiologically isolated in one case. All isolates were classified as MAP type C and profiled as INMV2 and MVS27 by molecular analysis. Genomic analysis of a field isolate revealed clusterization with a European clade but was more similar to Italian than East European isolates. Our findings underline that paratuberculosis should always be considered in zoological parks in which endangered species are hosted. Infection can be subclinical, and multiple combined testing techniques may be necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani10111949DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7690729PMC
October 2020

What is your diagnosis? Prepubic mass in a mare.

Vet Clin Pathol 2020 Sep 27;49(3):500-502. Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria (DIMEVET), Università degli Studi di Milano (UNIMI), Lodi, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vcp.12891DOI Listing
September 2020

Bleaching melanin in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanoma specimens using visible light: a pilot study.

Eur J Histochem 2019 Oct 31;63(4). Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Department of Veterinary Medicine (DIMEVET), University of Milan, Lodi.

In fluorescence microscopy, light radiation can be used to bleach fluorescent molecules in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, in order to increase the ratio between signal of interest and background autofluorescence. We tested if the same principle can be exploited in bright field microscopy to bleach pigmented melanoma FFPE sections together with cell morphology maintenance. After dewaxing and rehydration, serial FFPE sections of a feline diffuse iris melanoma, a canine dermal melanoma, a gray horse dermal melanoma and a swine cutaneous melanoma were irradiated with visible light for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days, prior to Hematoxylin and Eosin staining. Complete bleaching was obtained after 1-day treatment in feline and swine melanomas, while 2 and 3 days were required in canine and equine neoplasms, respectively. In all treated samples, cell morphology was maintained. Photo-induced bleaching combined with immunohistochemistry was tested after a 3-day photo-treatment using five different markers. According to the literature, in all samples neoplastic cells stained positive for vimentin, S100 and PNL2, while negative for FVIII and pancytokeratin. In conclusion, visible light can be effectively exploited to bleach pigmented melanoma FFPE sections prior to perform routine histochemical and immunohistochemical stains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/ejh.2019.3071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829521PMC
October 2019
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