Publications by authors named "Claudio Anasetti"

204 Publications

Phase 2 multicenter trial of ofatumumab and prednisone as initial therapy of chronic graft-vs-host disease.

Blood Adv 2021 Oct 14. Epub 2021 Oct 14.

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, United States.

Standard initial therapy of chronic graft vs. host disease (cGVHD) with glucocorticoids results in suboptimal and transient responses in a significant number of patients. Safety and feasibility of anti-CD20 directed B-cell therapy with ofatumumab (1000 mg IV on days 0 and 14) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was previously established in our phase I trial (n=12). We now report the mature results of the phase II expansion of the trial (n=38). The overall NIH severity of cGVHD was moderate (63%) or severe (37%) with 74% of all patients affected by the overlap subtype of cGVHD and 82% by prior acute cGVHD. The combined therapy was generally well tolerated, with some anticipated infusion reactions to ofatumumab, and common toxicities of glucocorticoids. Total B-cell depletion following therapy was profound, with marginal recovery within first 12 months from initial therapy. The observed 6 month clinician-reported and 2014 NIH-defined overall response rates (ORR=complete + partial response[CR/PR]) of 62.5% (1-sided lower 90% confidence interval=51.5%) were not superior to pre-specified historic benchmark of 60%. Post-hoc comparison of 6 month NIH response suggested benefit compared to more contemporaneous NIH-based benchmark of 48.6% with frontline sirolimus/prednisone (CTN 0801 trial). Baseline cGVHD features (organ involvement, severity, initial IS agents) were not significantly associated with 6-month ORR. The median time to initiation of second-line therapy was 5.4 months (range 0.9-15.1 months). Failure-free survival (FFS) was 64.2% (95% CI 46.5-77.4%) at 6 months and 53.1% (95% CI 35.8-67.7%) at 12 months, whereas FFS with CR/PR at 12 months of 33.5% exceeded a benchmark of 15% in post-hoc analysis, and was associated with greater success in steroid discontinuation by 24 months (odds ratio 8 (95% CI 1.21-52.7). This single-arm phase II trial demonstrated acceptable safety and potential efficacy of the upfront use of ofatumumab in combination with prednisone in cGVHD. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01680965.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2021005552DOI Listing
October 2021

Objective and subjective physical function in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2021 Aug 11. Epub 2021 Aug 11.

Health Outcomes and Behavior, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA.

We conducted a prospective study of adult allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients to assess pre- and post-HCT physical function. Baseline measurements included a wrist actigraphy, a 6 min walk test (6MWT), an international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ), and a Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant (FACT-BMT) as well as serial post-HCT assessments of 6MWT, IPAQ, and FACT-BMT. Forty-seven patients were evaluable for functionality assessments, with a median follow-up of 54.5 months for surviving recipients. No patients demonstrated vigorous or very vigorous activity at any time during monitoring by wrist actigraphy; patients spent a median of 6 h daily sedentary. Self-reported activity via the IPAQ showed 36%, 43%, and 21% of subjects reporting light, moderate, and vigorous activity prior to HCT, respectively. Post-HCT 6MWTs on day +30 demonstrated the greatest association with subsequent survival and non-relapse mortality. A decline in 6MWT distance over time also demonstrated worsened overall survival. This study shows the feasibility of fitness assessments and the ability to risk stratify for subsequent mortality, particularly using the 6MWT on the day +30 single time point assessment and change scores from baseline to day +30 post HCT. These pilot findings suggest important targets for future study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-021-01428-1DOI Listing
August 2021

Increased Infections and Delayed CD4 T Cell but Faster B Cell Immune Reconstitution after Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide Compared to Conventional GVHD Prophylaxis in Allogeneic Transplantation.

Transplant Cell Ther 2021 Jul 28. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.

Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is being increasingly used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) across various donor types. However, immune reconstitution and infection incidence after PTCy-based versus conventional GVHD prophylaxis has not been well studied. We evaluated the infection density and immune reconstitution (ie, absolute CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, natural killer cell, and B cell counts) at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year post-HCT in 583 consecutive adult patients undergoing allo-HCT with myeloablative (n = 223) or reduced-intensity (n = 360) conditioning between 2012 and 2018. Haploidentical (haplo; n = 75) and 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated (MUD; n = 08) donor types were included. GVHD prophylaxis was PTCy-based in all haplo (n = 75) and in 38 MUD allo-HCT recipients, whereas tacrolimus/methotrexate (Tac/MTX) was used in 89 and Tac/Sirolimus (Tac/Sir) was used in 381 MUD allo-HCT recipients. Clinical outcomes, including infections, nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, and overall survival (OS), were compared across the 4 treatment groups. The recovery of absolute total CD4 T-cell count was significantly lower in the haplo-PTCy and MUD-PTCy groups compared with the Tac/MTX and Tac/Sir groups throughout 1 year post-allo-HCT (P = .025). In contrast, CD19 B-cell counts at 6 months and thereafter were higher in the haplo-PTCy and MUD-PTCy groups compared with the Tac/MTX and Tac/Sir groups (P < .001). Total CD8 T cell and NK cell recovery was not significantly different among the groups. Infection density analysis showed a significantly higher frequency of total infections in the haplo-PTCy and MUD-PTCy groups compared with the Tac/MTX and Tac/Sir groups (5.0 and 5.0 vs 1.8 and 2.6 per 1000-person days; P < .01) within 1 year of allo-HCT. The cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation/infection at 1 year post-allo-HCT was higher in the haplo-PTCy group (51%) compared with the MUD-PTCy (26%), Tac/MTX (26%), or Tac/Sir (13%) groups (P < .001). The incidence of BK, human herpesvirus 6, and other viruses were also higher in the PTCy-based groups. Overall, the treatment groups had similar 2 year NRM (P = .27) and OS (P = .78) outcomes. Our data show that PTCy-based GVHD prophylaxis is associated with delayed CD4 T cell but faster B cell immune reconstitution and a higher frequency of infections compared with conventional GVHD prophylaxis but has no impact on nonrelapse mortality or overall survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtct.2021.07.023DOI Listing
July 2021

A phase 2 trial of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat for graft-versus-host disease prevention.

Blood Adv 2021 07;5(13):2740-2750

Blood & Marrow Transplant & Cellular Immunotherapy.

Immunomodulatory properties of histone deacetylase inhibitors represent a reasonable approach for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) prevention. We report a phase 2 trial evaluating panobinostat (PANO) administered over 26 weeks, starting on day -5 (5 mg orally 3 times a week) with tacrolimus initiated on day -3 plus sirolimus on day -1, with a median patient age of 58 years (range, 19-72 years) (n = 38). Donor source consisted of HLA 8/8-matched donors, related (n = 13) or unrelated (n = 25), using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-stimulated peripheral blood stem cells. Myeloablative (n = 18) or reduced-intensity (n = 20) conditioning regimens were used for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 17), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 13), or other malignancies (n = 8). The cumulative incidence of aGVHD II-IV by day 100 was 18.4% (90% confidence interval [CI], 9.4% to 29.9%). Cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 1 year was 31.6% (90% CI, 19.5% to 44.3%). Adverse events related to PANO were thrombocytopenia (n = 5), leukopenia (n = 6), gastrointestinal toxicity (n = 3), rash (n = 4), renal failure/peripheral edema (n = 1), and periorbital edema (n = 1). At 1 year, overall survival was 89.5% (90% CI, 81.6% to 98.0%), relapse-free survival was 78.9% (90% CI, 68.8% to 90.6%), nonrelapse mortality was 2.6% (90% CI, 0.3% to 9.9%), and GVHD relapse-free survival was 60.5% (90% CI, 48.8% to 75.1%). PANO hits histone 3 as early as day 15 in CD8, CD4 and T regs. In conclusion, PANO combination met the primary study end point for aGVHD prevention and warrants further testing. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02588339.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2021004225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8288668PMC
July 2021

National Marrow Donor Program-Sponsored Multicenter, Phase II Trial of HLA-Mismatched Unrelated Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation Using Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide.

J Clin Oncol 2021 Jun 27;39(18):1971-1982. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD.

Purpose: Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is curative for hematologic disorders, but outcomes are historically inferior when using HLA-mismatched donors. Despite unrelated donor registries listing > 38 million volunteers, 25%-80% of US patients lack an HLA-matched unrelated donor, with significant disparity across ethnic groups. We hypothesized that HCT with a mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) using post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy), a novel strategy successful in overcoming genetic disparity using mismatched related donors, would be feasible and increase access to HCT.

Patients And Methods: We performed a prospective phase II study of MMUD bone marrow HCT with PTCy for patients with hematologic malignancies. The primary end point was 1-year overall survival (OS), hypothesized to be 65% or better. 80 patients enrolled at 11 US transplant centers (December 2016-March 2019). Following myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning-based HCT, patients received PTCy on days +3, +4, with sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil starting on day +5. We compared outcomes to Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research contemporary controls receiving PTCy.

Results: Notably, 48% of patients enrolled were ethnic minorities. 39% of pairs were matched for 4-6 out of 8 HLA alleles. The primary end point was met, with 1-year OS of 76% (90% CI, 67.3 to 83.3) in the entire cohort, and 72% and 79% in the myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning strata, respectively. Secondary end points related to engraftment and graft-versus-host-disease were reached. Multivariate analysis comparing the study group with other mismatched HCT controls found no significant differences in OS.

Conclusion: Our prospective study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of HCT with an MMUD in the setting of PTCy. Remarkably, nearly half of the study participants belonged to an ethnic minority population, suggesting this approach may significantly expand access to HCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.20.03502DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8260905PMC
June 2021

ELN 2017 Genetic Risk Stratification Predicts Survival of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Transplant Cell Ther 2021 03 2;27(3):256.e1-256.e7. Epub 2021 Feb 2.

Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address:

European LeukemiaNet (ELN) 2017 risk stratification by genetics is prognostic of outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the prognostic impact of the 2017 ELN genetic risk stratification after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is not well established. We examined the effect of 2017 ELN genetic risk stratification on alloHCT outcomes of AML. We included 500 adult (≥18 years) AML patients in first (n = 370) or second (n = 130) complete remission receiving alloHCT from 2005 to 2016. Patients were classified into favorable (12%), intermediate (57%), and adverse (32%) 2017 ELN risk groups. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to conduct the multivariable analyses of leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS). Relapse and nonrelapse mortality were analyzed by the Fine-Gray regression model. OS at 2 years was 72% in the favorable versus 60% in the intermediate versus 45% in the adverse risk groups (P < .001). In multivariable analyses, the 2017 ELN classifier was an independent predictor of OS after alloHCT with significantly higher overall mortality in the intermediate (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.68; P = .03) and adverse (HR = 2.50, 95% CI, 1.54-4.06; P < .001) risk groups compared to the favorable risk group. Similarly, LFS was worse in the intermediate (HR = 1.63, 95%, CI 1.06-2.53; P = .03) and adverse (HR 2.23, 95% CI, 1.41-3.54; P < .001) risk groups while relapse was higher in the adverse risk group (HR = 2.36, 95% CI, 1.28-4.35; P = .006) as compared to the favorable risk group. These data highlight the prognostic impact of the 2017 ELN genetic risk stratification on the survival of AML patients after alloHCT. Patients in the adverse risk group had the highest risk of relapse and worst survival. Thus the 2017 ELN prognostic system can help identify AML patients who may benefit from clinical trials offering relapse mitigation strategies to improve transplant outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtct.2020.12.021DOI Listing
March 2021

Pacritinib Combined with Sirolimus and Low-Dose Tacrolimus for GVHD Prevention after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Preclinical and Phase I Trial Results.

Clin Cancer Res 2021 May 22;27(10):2712-2722. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Purpose: In this first-in-human, phase I, GVHD prevention trial (NCT02891603), we combine pacritinib (PAC), a JAK2 inhibitor, with sirolimus to concurrently reduce T-cell costimulation via mTOR and IL6 activity. We evaluate the safety of pacritinib when administered with sirolimus plus low-dose tacrolimus (PAC/SIR/TAC) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Patients And Methods: The preclinical efficacy and immune modulation of PAC/SIR were investigated in xenogeneic GVHD. Our phase I trial followed a 3+3 dose-escalation design, including dose level 1 (pacritinib 100 mg daily), level 2 (pacritinib 100 mg twice daily), and level 3 (pacritinib 200 mg twice daily). The primary endpoint was to identify the lowest biologically active and safe dose of pacritinib with SIR/TAC ( = 12). Acute GVHD was scored through day +100. Allografts included 8/8 HLA-matched related or unrelated donor peripheral blood stem cells.

Results: In mice, we show that dual JAK2/mTOR inhibition significantly reduces xenogeneic GVHD and increases peripheral regulatory T cell (Treg) potency as well as Treg induction from conventional CD4 T cells. Pacritinib 100 mg twice a day was identified as the minimum biologically active and safe dose for further study. JAK2/mTOR inhibition suppresses pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells, spares Tregs and antileukemia effector cells, and exhibits preliminary activity in preventing GVHD. PAC/SIR/TAC preserves donor cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity and permits timely engraftment without cytopenias.

Conclusions: We demonstrate that PAC/SIR/TAC is safe and preliminarily limits acute GVHD, preserves donor CMV immunity, and permits timely engraftment. The efficacy of PAC/SIR/TAC will be tested in our ongoing phase II GVHD prevention trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-20-4725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8127396PMC
May 2021

Impact of infused CD34+ stem cell dosing for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with post-transplant cyclophosphamide.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2021 07 3;56(7):1683-1690. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Bone Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA.

Higher infused total nucleated cell dose (TNC) in allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) with post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is associated with improved overall survival. As many centers prefer peripheral blood stem cell grafts (PBSCT) with PTCy, the effect of cell dose on outcomes with this platform also requires elucidation. We retrospectively evaluated 144 consecutive adult patients who received allogeneic T-cell replete PBSCT with PTCy-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis for a hematologic malignancy from 2012-2018. The infused CD34+ cell dose was stratified into low (<5 × 10/kg), intermediate (5-10 × 10/kg) and high (>10 × 10/kg) dose level groups. In multivariate analysis, the low CD34+ cell dose group had worse non-relapse mortality (HR = 4.51, 95% CI: 1.92-10.58, p < 0.001), progression- free survival (HR = 4.11, 95% CI: 2.07-8.15, p < 0.001), and overall survival (HR = 4.06, 95% CI: 2.00-8.25, p ≤ 0.001) compared to the intermediate group. Clinical outcomes between the intermediate and high CD34+ cell dose groups were similar. TNC and CD3+ cell dose had no significant impacts on outcomes. These findings suggest that, in patients receiving allogeneic PBSCT with PTCy, infused CD34+ cell doses >5 × 10 cells/kg may result in improved survival. Thus, this study supports targeting a CD34+ cell dose of >5 × 10 cells/kg for allogeneic PBSCT with PTCy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-021-01219-8DOI Listing
July 2021

A phase 2 trial of GVHD prophylaxis with PTCy, sirolimus, and MMF after peripheral blood haploidentical transplantation.

Blood Adv 2021 03;5(5):1154-1163

Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, and.

The introduction of posttransplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) made performing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from HLA haplotype-incompatible donors possible. In a setting of PTCy and tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, a peripheral blood (PB) graft source as compared with bone marrow reduces the relapse rate but increases acute GVHD (aGVHD) and chronic GVHD (cGVHD). This phase 2 trial assessed sirolimus and MMF efficacy following PTCy as a GVHD prophylaxis after PB haploidentical HCT (haplo-HCT). With 32 evaluable patients (≥18 years) enrolled, this study had 90% power to demonstrate a reduction in 100-day grade II-IV aGVHD to 20% from the historical benchmark of 40% after haplo-HCT using PTCy/tacrolimus/MMF. At a median follow-up of 16.1 months, the primary end point of the trial was met with a day-100 grade II-IV aGVHD cumulative incidence of 18.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5% to 34.0%). There were no graft-failure events and the 1-year probability of National Institutes of Health (NIH) moderate/severe cGVHD was 18.8% (95% CI, 7.4% to 34.0%), nonrelapse mortality was 18.8% (95% CI, 7.4% to 34.0%), relapse was 22.2% (95% CI, 9.6% to 38.2%), disease-free survival was 59.0% (95% CI, 44.1% to 79.0%), GVHD-free relapse-free survival was 49.6% (95% CI, 34.9% to 70.5%), and overall survival was 71.7% (95% CI, 57.7% to 89.2%) for the entire cohort. These data demonstrate that GVHD prophylaxis with sirolimus/MMF following PTCy effectively prevents grade II-IV aGVHD after PB haplo-HCT, warranting prospective comparison of sirolimus vs tacrolimus in combination with MMF following PTCy as GVHD prophylaxis after PB HCT. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT03018223.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003779DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7948297PMC
March 2021

First-line hypomethylating agents for patients with high risk chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

Lancet Haematol 2021 02;8(2):e99-e101

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3026(20)30401-4DOI Listing
February 2021

Tumor interferon signaling and suppressive myeloid cells are associated with CAR T-cell failure in large B-cell lymphoma.

Blood 2021 May;137(19):2621-2633

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy.

Axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) is a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL). This study evaluated whether immune dysregulation, present before CAR T-cell therapy, was associated with treatment failure. Tumor expression of interferon (IFN) signaling, high blood levels of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs), and high blood interleukin-6 and ferritin levels were each associated with a lack of durable response. Similar to other cancers, we found that in LBCL tumors, IFN signaling is associated with the expression of multiple checkpoint ligands, including programmed cell death-ligand 1, and these were higher in patients who lacked durable responses to CAR-T therapy. Moreover, tumor IFN signaling and blood M-MDSCs associated with decreased axi-cel expansion. Finally, patients with high tumor burden had higher immune dysregulation with increased serum inflammatory markers and tumor IFN signaling. These data support that immune dysregulation in LBCL promotes axi-cel resistance via multiple mechanistic programs: insufficient axi-cel expansion associated with both circulating M-MDSC and tumor IFN signaling, which also gives rise to expression of immune checkpoint ligands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020007445DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8120145PMC
May 2021

Tumor Microenvironment Composition and Severe Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS) Influence Toxicity in Patients with Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated with Axicabtagene Ciloleucel.

Clin Cancer Res 2020 09 15;26(18):4823-4831. Epub 2020 Jul 15.

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.

Purpose: One of the challenges of adoptive T-cell therapy is the development of immune-mediated toxicities including cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity (NT). We aimed to identify factors that place patients at high risk of severe toxicity or treatment-related death in a cohort of 75 patients with large B-cell lymphoma treated with a standard of care CD19 targeted CAR T-cell product (axicabtagene ciloleucel).

Experimental Design: Serum cytokine and catecholamine levels were measured prior to lymphodepleting chemotherapy, on the day of CAR T infusion and daily thereafter while patients remained hospitalized. Tumor biopsies were taken within 1 month prior to CAR T infusion for evaluation of gene expression.

Results: We identified an association between pretreatment levels of IL6 and life-threatening CRS and NT. Because the risk of toxicity was related to pretreatment factors, we hypothesized that the tumor microenvironment (TME) may influence CAR T-cell toxicity. In pretreatment patient tumor biopsies, gene expression of myeloid markers was associated with higher toxicity.

Conclusions: These results suggest that a proinflammatory state and an unfavorable TME preemptively put patients at risk for toxicity after CAR T-cell therapy. Tailoring toxicity management strategies to patient risk may reduce morbidity and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-20-1434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7501265PMC
September 2020

Human CD83-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T cells prevent and treat graft-versus-host disease.

J Clin Invest 2020 09;130(9):4652-4662

Department of Immunology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USA.

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). For decades, GVHD prophylaxis has included calcineurin inhibitors, despite their incomplete efficacy and impairment of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL). Distinct from pharmacologic immune suppression, we have developed what we believe is a novel, human CD83-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell for GVHD prevention. CD83 is expressed on allo-activated conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconvs) and proinflammatory dendritic cells (DCs), which are both implicated in GVHD pathogenesis. Human CD83 CAR T cells eradicate pathogenic CD83+ target cells, substantially increase the ratio of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to allo-activated Tconvs, and provide durable prevention of xenogeneic GVHD. CD83 CAR T cells are also capable of treating xenogeneic GVHD. We show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expresses CD83 and that myeloid leukemia cell lines are readily killed by CD83 CAR T cells. Human CD83 CAR T cells are a promising cell-based approach to preventing 2 critical complications of allo-HCT - GVHD and relapse. Thus, the use of human CD83 CAR T cells for GVHD prevention and treatment, as well as for targeting CD83+ AML, warrants clinical investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI135754DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7456225PMC
September 2020

Sole Upfront Therapy with Beclomethasone and Budesonide for Upper Gastrointestinal Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2020 07 30;26(7):1303-1311. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida; Department of Oncological Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida. Electronic address:

Systemic glucocorticoids remain the standard treatment for gastrointestinal (GI) acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) despite their toxicity and incomplete efficacy. Controlled trials have tested poorly absorbable steroids as adjuncts with systemic glucocorticoids, but only small case series have reported treatment with poorly absorbed beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) and budesonide (BUD) alone. Our team has adopted the practice of administering BDP or BDP+BUD without systemic glucocorticoids as first-line therapy for isolated upper GI (UGI) aGVHD. We report results in 76 patients treated with BDP alone and in 81 patients treated with BDP+BUD, with allocation by physician choice. Almost all patients received peripheral blood stem cells (92%) from a fully HLA-matched related or unrelated donor (80%) after myeloablative conditioning (76%) for acute leukemia (49%), myelodysplastic syndrome (17%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (14%), or another hematopoietic disorders (20%). After 28 days of treatment with BDP, 46% of the patients had a complete response (CR) and 10% had a partial response (PR); after 200 days, 61 (80%) patients were alive, 34% maintained a CR, and 3% maintained a PR, whereas 53% required additional immunosuppression (IS). After 28 days of treatment with BDP+BUD, 67% had a CR and 10% a PR; after 200 days, 74 (91%) patients were alive, 46% maintained a CR, and 2% maintained a PR, whereas 43% required additional IS. Among the entire cohort of 157 patients, 66 (42%) were treated successfully without systemic glucocorticoids. This study reports the efficacy of poorly absorbable steroids alone for patients with isolated UGI aGVHD. Prospective trials should test for the potential advantages of BDP and BUD use over systemic glucocorticoids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.04.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7771266PMC
July 2020

Metabolic reprogramming augments potency of human pSTAT3-inhibited iTregs to suppress alloreactivity.

JCI Insight 2020 05 7;5(9). Epub 2020 May 7.

Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Immunosuppressive donor Tregs can prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or solid-organ allograft rejection. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation (pSTAT3) augments FOXP3 expression, stabilizing induced Tregs (iTregs). Here we report that human pSTAT3-inhibited iTregs prevent human skin graft rejection and xenogeneic GVHD yet spare donor antileukemia immunity. pSTAT3-inhibited iTregs express increased levels of skin-homing cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen, immunosuppressive GARP and PD-1, and IL-9 that supports tolerizing mast cells. Further, pSTAT3-inhibited iTregs significantly reduced alloreactive conventional T cells, Th1, and Th17 cells implicated in GVHD and tissue rejection and impaired infiltration by pathogenic Th2 cells. Mechanistically, pSTAT3 inhibition of iTregs provoked a shift in metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) to glycolysis and reduced electron transport chain activity. Strikingly, cotreatment with coenzyme Q10 restored OxPhos in pSTAT3-inhibited iTregs and augmented their suppressive potency. These findings support the rationale for clinically testing the safety and efficacy of metabolically tuned, human pSTAT3-inhibited iTregs to control alloreactive T cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.136437DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7253027PMC
May 2020

Reduced-intensity fludarabine/melphalan confers similar survival to busulfan/fludarabine myeloablative regimens for patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplasia.

Leuk Lymphoma 2020 07 5;61(7):1678-1687. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA.

Optimal conditioning chemotherapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) remains uncertain. Myeloablative regimens such as fludarabine/busulfan are favored over reduced-intensity fludarabine/melphalan (Flu/Mel); however, it is not known if Flu/Mel is inferior. We analyzed hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients with AML and MDS who received fludarabine with once-daily intravenous busulfan targeted to either area under the curve (AUC) 5300 µM*L/min (Flu/Bu 5300) ( = 246) or AUC 3500 µM*L/min (Flu/Bu 3500) ( = 81), or Flu/Mel ( = 69). Flu/Bu regimens were compared separately to Flu/Mel. After 2-year follow-up, no differences in overall or relapse-free survival were found between Flu/Bu 5300 or 3500 versus Flu/Mel though relapse rates were significantly higher; 33.1% ( = 0.024), 44.6% ( = 0.002), versus 19.4%, respectively. Flu/Bu 5300 ( = 0.008) and Flu/Bu 3500 ( < 0.001) groups were prognostic for relapse compared to Flu/Mel. Flu/Mel yields lower relapse rates and similar survival benefit when compared to Flu/Bu 3500 or 5300 µM*L/min.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2020.1731498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7771324PMC
July 2020

Randomized multicenter trial of sirolimus vs prednisone as initial therapy for standard-risk acute GVHD: the BMT CTN 1501 trial.

Blood 2020 01;135(2):97-107

Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN.

Clinical- and biomarker-based tools may identify a lower-risk acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) population amenable to novel, reduced-intensity treatments. Previous data suggest sirolimus may rival standard of care prednisone. We conducted a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/National Cancer Institute-funded Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network multicenter, open-label, randomized phase 2 trial to estimate the difference in day 28 complete response (CR)/partial response (PR) rates for sirolimus vs prednisone as initial treatment of patients with standard risk (SR) acute GVHD as defined by the Minnesota (MN) GVHD Risk Score and Ann Arbor (AA1/2) biomarker status. A total of 127 MN-SR patients were randomized (1:1), and 122 were AA1/2 (sirolimus, n = 58; prednisone, n = 64). Others were AA3 (n = 4), or AA status missing (n = 1). The day 28 CR/PR rates were similar for sirolimus 64.8% (90% confidence interval [CI], 54.1%-75.5%) vs 73% (90% CI, 63.8%-82.2%) for prednisone. The day 28 rate of CR/PR with prednisone ≤0.25 mg/kg/day was significantly higher for sirolimus than prednisone (66.7% vs 31.7%; P < .001). No differences were detected in steroid-refractory acute GVHD, disease-free survival, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall survival. Sirolimus was associated with reduced steroid exposure and hyperglycemia, reduced grade 2 to 3 infections, improvement in immune suppression discontinuation and patient-reported quality of life, and increased risk for thrombotic microangiopathy. For patients with clinical- and biomarker-based SR acute GVHD, sirolimus demonstrates similar overall initial treatment efficacy as prednisone. In addition, sirolimus therapy spares steroid exposure and allied toxicity, does not compromise long-term survival outcomes, and is associated with improved patient-reported quality of life. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02806947.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2019003125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6952830PMC
January 2020

Factors Associated With Successful Discontinuation of Immune Suppression After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

JAMA Oncol 2020 Jan 9;6(1):e192974. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Importance: Immune suppression discontinuation is routinely attempted after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and under current practices may lead to graft-vs-host disease (GVHD)-associated morbidity and death. However, the likelihood and predictive factors associated with successful immune suppression discontinuation after HCT are poorly understood.

Objectives: To examine factors associated with successful immune suppression discontinuation and risk for immune suppression discontinuation failure under conventional HCT approaches and develop a practical tool to estimate successful immune suppression discontinuation likelihood at the clinical point of care.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Using long-term follow-up data from 2 national Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trial Network studies (N = 827), a multistate model was developed to investigate the probability and variables associated with immune suppression discontinuation success. The study began in July 2015, and analyses were completed in August 2019.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Immune suppression discontinuation and immune suppression discontinuation failure.

Results: Of the 827 patients included in the analysis, 456 were men (55.1%). Median age at transplant was 44 (range, <1-67) years. With median follow-up of 72 (range, 11-124) months, 20.0% of the patients were alive and not receiving immune suppression at 5 years. Older recipient age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of >50 vs <30 years, 0.27, 99% CI, 0.14-0.50; P < .001), mismatched unrelated donor (aOR, mismatched unrelated vs matched related, 0.37; 99% CI, 0.14-0.97; P = .008), peripheral blood graft (aOR of peripheral blood graft vs bone marrow, 0.46; 99% CI, 0.26-0.82; P < .001), and advanced stage disease (aOR of advanced vs early disease, 0.45; 99% CI, 0.23-0.86, P = 0.002), were significantly associated with decreased odds of immune suppression discontinuation. Failed attempts at immune suppression discontinuation (127 patients [37.1% of total immune suppression discontinuation events]) resulting in GVHD were significantly associated with use of peripheral blood stem cells (HR, 2.62; 99% CI, 1.30-5.29; P < .001), prior GVHD, and earlier immune suppression discontinuation attempts. Earlier immune suppression discontinuation was not associated with protection from cancer relapse after HCT (adjusted hazard ratio for discontinuation vs not, 1.95; 99% CI, 0.88-4.31; P = .03).Dynamic prediction models were developed to provide future immune suppression discontinuation probability according to individual patient characteristics.

Conclusions And Relevance: Successful immune suppression discontinuation is uncommon in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell grafts. The data suggest earlier attempts at ISD conferred no long-term benefit, given frequent ISD failure, limited subsequent success after initial failed ISD attempt, and no evidence of relapse reduction. Using a risk model-based clinical application, physicians may be able to identify individual patients' probability of successful immune suppression discontinuation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.2974DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6763979PMC
January 2020

Kinetics of immune cell reconstitution predict survival in allogeneic bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized stem cell transplantation.

Blood Adv 2019 08;3(15):2250-2263

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

The clinical utility of monitoring immune reconstitution after allotransplant was evaluated using data from Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network BMT CTN 0201 (NCT00075816), a multicenter randomized study of unrelated donor bone marrow (BM) vs granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized blood stem cell (G-PB) grafts. Among 410 patients with posttransplant flow cytometry measurements of immune cell subsets, recipients of G-PB grafts had faster T-cell reconstitution than BM recipients, including more naive CD4 T cells and T-cell receptor excision circle-positive CD4 and CD8 T cells at 3 months, consistent with better thymic function. Faster reconstitution of CD4 T cells and naive CD4 T cells at 1 month and CD8 T cells at 3 months predicted more chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) but better survival in G-PB recipients, but consistent associations of T-cell amounts with GVHD or survival were not seen in BM recipients. In contrast, a higher number of classical dendritic cells (cDCs) in blood samples at 3 months predicted better survival in BM recipients. Functional T-cell immunity measured in vitro by cytokine secretion in response to stimulation with cytomegalovirus peptides was similar when comparing blood samples from BM and G-PB recipients, but the degree to which acute GVHD suppressed immune reconstitution varied according to graft source. BM, but not G-PB, recipients with a history of grades 2-4 acute GVHD had lower numbers of B cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and cDCs at 3 months. Thus, early measurements of T-cell reconstitution are predictive cellular biomarkers for long-term survival and response to GVHD therapy in G-PB recipients, whereas more robust DC reconstitution predicted better survival in BM recipients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2018029892DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6693008PMC
August 2019

Harmonization of Busulfan Plasma Exposure Unit (BPEU): A Community-Initiated Consensus Statement.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 09 25;25(9):1890-1897. Epub 2019 May 25.

Department of Pharmacy and Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children and Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Busulfan therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is often used to achieve target plasma exposures. Variability in busulfan plasma exposure units (BPEU) is a potential source for misinterpretation of publications and protocols and is a barrier to data capture by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) registry databases. We sought to harmonize to a single BPEU for international use. Using Delphi consensus methodology, iterative surveys were sent to an increasing number of relevant clinical stakeholders. In survey 1, 14 stakeholders were asked to identify ideal properties of a BPEU. In survey 2, 52 stakeholders were asked (1) to evaluate BPEU candidates according to ideal BPEU properties established by survey 1 and local position statements for TDM and (2) to identify potential facilitators and barriers to adoption of the harmonized BPEU. The most frequently used BPEU identified, in descending order, were area under the curve (AUC) in μM × min, AUC in mg × h/L, concentration at steady state (Css) in ng/mL, AUC in μM × h, and AUC in μg × h/L. All respondents conceptually agreed on the ideal properties of a BPEU and to adopt a harmonized BPEU. Respondents were equally divided between selecting AUC in μM × min versus mg × h/L for harmonization. AUC in mg × h/L was finally selected as the harmonized BPEU, because it satisfied most of the survey-determined ideal properties for the harmonized BPEU and is read easily understood in the clinical practice environment. Furthermore, 10 major professional societies have endorsed AUC in mg × h/L as the harmonized unit for reporting to HCT registry databases and for use in future protocols and publications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.05.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6755045PMC
September 2019

Inhibition of Human Dendritic Cell ER Stress Response Reduces T Cell Alloreactivity Yet Spares Donor Anti-tumor Immunity.

Front Immunol 2018 6;9:2887. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy, Tampa, FL, United States.

Acute graft- vs. -host disease (GVHD) is an important cause of morbidity and death after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We identify a new approach to prevent GVHD that impairs monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDC) alloactivation of T cells, yet preserves graft- vs.-leukemia (GVL). Exceeding endoplasmic reticulum (ER) capacity results in a spliced form of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1s). XBP-1s mediates ER stress and inflammatory responses. We demonstrate that siRNA targeting XBP-1 in moDCs abrogates their stimulation of allogeneic T cells. B-I09, an inositol-requiring enzyme-1α (IRE1α) inhibitor that prevents XBP-1 splicing, reduces human moDC migration, allo-stimulatory potency, and curtails moDC IL-1β, TGFβ, and p40 cytokines, suppressing Th1 and Th17 cell priming. B-I09-treated moDCs reduce responder T cell activation via calcium flux without interfering with regulatory T cell (Treg) function or GVL effects by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells. In a human T cell mediated xenogeneic GVHD model, B-I09 inhibition of XBP-1s reduced target-organ damage and pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells without impacting donor Tregs or anti-tumor CTL. DC XBP-1s inhibition provides an innovative strategy to prevent GVHD and retain GVL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02887DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6291501PMC
October 2019

Analysis of BMT CTN-0201 and -0901 samples did not reproduce the reported association between recipient REG3A rs7588571 and chronic GVHD.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2019 03 31;54(3):490-493. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0331-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6395530PMC
March 2019

Defining Competency to Empower Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy Quality Management Professionals in Healthcare.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 01 21;25(1):179-182. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.

Blood and marrow transplant (BMT) programs worldwide frequently employ a quality management professional who is charged with securing quality and maintaining regulatory requirements. Although many BMT programs employ an individual to oversee quality management, there are no standard definitions of the education, training, and core competencies needed to successfully perform this role. The goal of this article is to propose the required qualifications and responsibilities of the BMT professional who oversees quality management and to elicit discussion to standardize such a role in BMT and cellular immunotherapy programs. Our results could serve as a model for quality managers in other complex healthcare environments. The recommendation and findings are primarily limited to cell therapy centers in North America.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.08.017DOI Listing
January 2019

Recipient single nucleotide polymorphisms in Paneth cell antimicrobial peptide genes and acute graft-versus-host disease: analysis of BMT CTN-0201 and -0901 samples.

Br J Haematol 2018 09 13;182(6):887-894. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Host genetics shape the gut microbiota, and gut dysbiosis increases the risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Paneth cells and microbiota have interactions that contribute to immune regulation. α-defensin-5 (HD5) and regenerating islet-derived protein 3 alpha (Reg3A) are the most abundant Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes for HD5 (DEFA5) and Reg3A (REG3A) predict aGVHD risk. We analysed pre-transplant recipient peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from randomized Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) studies 0201 (94 patients with bone marrow and 93 with peripheral blood grafts) and 0901 (86 patients with myeloablative and 77 with reduced-intensity conditioning; all using peripheral blood grafts). In multivariable analysis (with a SNP × graft source interaction term in CTN-0201 and a SNP × conditioning intensity term in CTN-0901), DEFA5 rs4415345 and rs4610776 were associated with altered incidence of aGVHD grade II-IV [rs4415345 G vs. C: hazard ratio (HR) 0·58, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0·37-0·92, P = 0·02; rs4610776 T vs. A: HR 1·53, 95% CI 1·01-2·32, P = 0·05] in CTN-0201, but not CTN-0901, suggesting a stronger effect in bone marrow allografts. REG3A SNP was not associated with aGVHD. Host genetics may influence aGVHD risk by modulating Paneth cell function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15492DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6128755PMC
September 2018

Hepatic veno-occlusive disease following sirolimus-based immune suppression.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2019 01 12;54(1):85-89. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

BMTCI H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, USA.

Sirolimus-based graft vs. host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis is associated with higher incidence of veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, whether the clinical manifestations and prognosis of VOD/SOS differs when diagnosed in the setting of sirolimus-based GVHD prophylaxis is not well studied. To address this question, we examined presenting features and treatment outcome of VOD/SOS cases identified in a large retrospective cohort of consecutive HCT procedures (n = 818 total, sirolimus (SIR)/tacrolimus (TAC) n = 308, and methotrexate (MTX) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/TAC n = 510). In multivariate analysis, sirolimus-based GVHD prophylaxis (p = 0.006, HR 3.33, 1.94-5.7) increased risk for VOD/SOS. A total of 58 patients were clinically diagnosed with VOD/SOS (SIR/TAC 38/308, 12.3%, vs. MTX or MMF/TAC 20/510, 3.9%). VOD/SOS diagnosed following SIR/TAC prophylaxis demonstrated later time of onset (median 39 vs. 26 days; p = 0.005), less severe hyperbilirubinemia (Bili > 2, 65% vs. 90% p = 0.04), lesser degree of weight gain (weight gain > 5%, 52% vs 80%, p = 0.04), and more frequent complete resolution of hepatic injury (79% vs. 55%, p = 0.05). Presenting features and natural history of VOD/SOS in the context of SIR/TAC GVHD prophylaxis differ and thus warrant particular clinical attention to later hepatic injury in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0233-2DOI Listing
January 2019

Transformation of T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma to Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma: A Report of Two Cases.

Case Rep Hematol 2018 28;2018:9191582. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA.

Nonhepatosplenic/noncutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma (NHNC PTCL) represents a miscellaneous group of unrelated T-cell lymphomas of which only isolated cases have been reported. We describe two cases of transformation from T-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma to NHNC PTCL. Transformation into more aggressive disease is a rare event in T-cell lineage-derived hematologic malignancies compared to B-cell neoplasms. Nevertheless, both of our cases involved relapse as PTCL manifested with skin involvement and an overt shift from blastic morphology to large granular leukemia-like mature T cells. Among other notable molecular characteristics, expression of immature markers such as TdT was lost in both cases. Based on cytogenetics, phenotype, and morphology, both patients represent a novel phenomenon of clonal transformation from T-ALL to PTCL which has rarely been reported in the literature. Such transformation may carry important diagnostic and biological implications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/9191582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5850893PMC
February 2018

Phase I trial of histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat in addition to glucocorticoids for primary therapy of acute graft-versus-host disease.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2018 11 18;53(11):1434-1444. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Blood & Marrow Transplant & Cellular Immunotherapy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA.

Glucocorticoids for primary therapy of acute GVHD have limited responses. A phase I/II trial tested 4 weeks of deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat started within 48 h of glucocorticoids (1 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) as primary treatment for patients with either classic acute GVHD (n = 16) or acute GVHD overlapping with chronic (n = 6). Four patients received 2.5 mg/m IV three times a week (TIW). Subsequent to discontinuation of IV panobinostat, patients received oral doses (PO). Two patients treated with 10 mg TIW (PO level 1) had progressive GVHD, after which patients were treated with 5 mg TIW (PO level -1; n = 16); 31/41 adverse events were possibly related, including thrombocytopenia (n = 13), leukopenia (n = 7), hypercholesterolemia (n = 3), hypertriglyceridemia (n = 5), anemia (n = 1), fatigue (n = 1), and hepatobiliary disorder (n = 1). GVHD responses were complete (n = 12) or partial (n = 3), with 1 progression at PO level -1. T-regulatory cells increased at day 8, CD4/CD8 and monocytes exhibited enhanced H3 acetylation, and CD4 or CD8 numbers remained unchanged with a decreased interleukin 12p40 plasma level. Panobinostat in combination with prednisone is safe and warrants further testing in GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0163-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7771280PMC
November 2018

Association between recipient TNF rs361525 and acute GVHD: results from analysis of BMT CTN-0201 samples.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2018 08 7;53(8):1069-1071. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0127-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6064382PMC
August 2018
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