Publications by authors named "Claudia Engemann"

4 Publications

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Use of meat juice and blood serum with a miniaturised protein microarray assay to develop a multi-parameter IgG screening test with high sample throughput potential for slaughtering pigs.

BMC Vet Res 2020 Apr 6;16(1):106. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Institute of Food Safety and Food Hygiene, Section Meat Hygiene, Freie Universität Berlin, Königsweg 67, D-14163, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Serological screening of pig herds at the abattoir is considered a potential tool to improve meat inspection procedures and herd health management. Therefore, we previously reported the feasibility of a miniaturised protein microarray as a new serological IgG screening test for zoonotic agents and production diseases in pigs. The present study investigates whether the protein microarray-based assay is applicable for high sample throughput using either blood serum or meat juice.

Material And Methods: Microarrays with 12 different antigens were produced by Abbott (formerly Alere Technologies GmbH) Jena, Germany in a previously offered 'ArrayTube' platform and in an 'ArrayStrip' platform for large-scale use. A test protocol for the use of meat juice on both microarray platforms was developed. Agreement between serum and meat juice was analysed with 88 paired samples from three German abattoirs. Serum was diluted 1:50 and meat juice 1:2. ELISA results for all tested antigens from a preceding study were used as reference test to perform Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis for both test specimens on both microarray platforms.

Results: High area under curve values (AUC > 0.7) were calculated for the analysis of T. gondii (0.87), Y. enterocolitica (0.97), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (0.84) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (0.71) with serum as the test specimen and for T. gondii (0.99), Y. enterocolitica (0.94), PRRSV (0.88), A. pleuropneumoniae (0.78) and Salmonella spp. (0.72) with meat juice as the test specimen on the ArrayStrip platform. Cohens kappa values of 0.92 for T. gondii and 0.82 for Y. enterocolitica were obtained for the comparison between serum and meat juice. When applying the new method in two further laboratories, kappa values between 0.63 and 0.94 were achieved between the laboratories for these two pathogens.

Conclusion: Further development of a miniaturised pig-specific IgG protein microarray assay showed that meat juice can be used on microarray platforms. Two out of twelve tested antigens (T. gondii, Y. enterocolitica) showed high test accuracy on the ArrayTube and the ArrayStrip platform with both sample materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02308-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7137480PMC
April 2020

Development of a miniaturized protein microarray as a new serological IgG screening test for zoonotic agents and production diseases in pigs.

PLoS One 2019 22;14(5):e0217290. Epub 2019 May 22.

Institute for Food Quality and Food Safety, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Hannover, Germany.

In order to monitor the occurrence of zoonotic agents in pig herds as well as to improve herd health management, the development of new cost-effective diagnostic methods for pigs is necessary. In this study, a protein microarray-based assay for the simultaneous detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against different zoonotic agents and pathogens causing production diseases in pigs was developed. Therefore, antigens of ten different important swine pathogens (Toxoplasma gondii, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Trichinella spp., Mycobacterium avium, Hepatitis E virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Influenza A virus) were spotted and covalently immobilized as 'antigen-spots' on microarray chips in order to test pig serum for the occurrence of antibodies. Pig serum was sampled at three German abattoirs and ELISA tests for the different pathogens were conducted with the purpose of creating a panel of reference samples for microarray analysis. To evaluate the accuracy of the antigens on the microarray, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using the ELISA test results as reference was performed for the different antigens. High area under curve values were achieved for the antigens of two zoonotic agents: Toxoplasma gondii (0.91), Yersinia enterocolitica (0.97) and for three production diseases: Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (0.77), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (0.94) and the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (0.87). With the help of the newly developed microarray assay, collecting data on the occurrence of antibodies against zoonotic agents and production diseases in pig herds could be minimized to one measurement, resulting in an efficient screening test.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0217290PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6530865PMC
February 2020

Improving the sensitivity of the IBR-gE ELISA for testing IBR marker vaccinated cows from bulk milk.

Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr 2012 Jul-Aug;125(7-8):290-6

Labor Diagnostik GmbH Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

The low sensitivity of the IBR-gE ELISA compared to other diagnostic ELISA tests for IBR is a major disadvantage of IBR control programmes based on IBR marker vaccination. Therefore the IBR-gE ELISA is not generally recommended for testing pooled or bulk milk samples.The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a commercially available kit for concentrating and purifying antibodies in milk in order to improve the sensitivity of detecting IBR-gE antibody positive cows from pooled and bulk milk samples. A single IBR-gE positive cow is likely to remain undetected in a pool of 49 negative milk samples without concentration. By contrast, the bulk milk concentration procedure improved sensitivity from 5.4% to 75.7% in a positive herd. Milk samples with a high or moderate positive signal are more likely to be detected after pool milk concentration compared to weak positive samples. Whereas a follow up study involving a monthly testing of bulk milk samples from three marker vaccinated IBR-gE negative herds over a period of seven months yielded negative results each month, bulk milk from a herd containing <5% IBR-gE positive cows always detected positive after concentration. Although the milk concentration procedure had no impact on specificity, it significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the detection of IBR-gE positive milk in pooled and bulk milk samples. After further evaluation this procedure could allow a cost efficient and reliable method of monitoring IBR marker-vaccinated herds for IBR-gE antibodies.
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November 2013

Identification and functional characterisation of genes and corresponding enzymes involved in carnitine metabolism of Proteus sp.

Arch Microbiol 2005 Mar 25;183(3):176-89. Epub 2005 Feb 25.

Pharmazie und Psychologie, Fakultät für Biowissenschaften, Institut für Biochemie, Universität Leipzig, Germany.

Enzymes involved in carnitine metabolism of Proteus sp. are encoded by the cai genes organised as the caiTABCDEF operon. The complete operon could be sequenced from the genomic DNA of Proteus sp. Amino acid sequence similarities and/or enzymatic analysis confirmed the function assigned to each protein involved in carnitine metabolism. CaiT was suggested to be an integral membrane protein responsible for the transport of betaines. The caiA gene product was shown to be a crotonobetainyl-CoA reductase catalysing the irreversible reduction of crotonobetainyl-CoA to gamma-butyrobetainyl-CoA. CaiB and CaiD were identified to be the two components of the crotonobetaine hydrating system, already described. CaiB and caiD were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification of both proteins, their individual enzymatic functions were solved. CaiB acts as betainyl-CoA transferase specific for carnitine, crotonobetaine, gamma-butyrobetaine and its CoA derivatives. Transferase reaction proceeds, following a sequential bisubstrate mechanism. CaiD was identified to be a crotonobetainyl-CoA hydratase belonging to the crotononase superfamily. Because of amino acid sequence similarities, CaiC was suggested to be a betainyl-CoA ligase. Taken together, these results show that the metabolism of carnitine and crotonobetaine in Proteus sp. proceeds at the CoA level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-005-0760-2DOI Listing
March 2005