Publications by authors named "Claudia Basilico"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Validation of the "fitness criteria" for the treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: A multicenter study on a series of 699 patients by the Network Rete Ematologica Lombarda (REL).

J Geriatr Oncol 2021 May 20;12(4):550-556. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Department of Hematology, ASST Spedali Civili of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.

Objectives: Treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still controversial. To facilitate treatment decisions, the "fitness criteria" proposed by Ferrara et al. (Leukemia, 2013), including age > 75 years, performance status and comorbidities, were verified retrospectively in 699 patients with AML (419 de-novo, 280 secondary AML), diagnosed at 8 Hematological Centers (REL).

Methods: Patients were categorized in FIT to intensive chemotherapy (i-T) (292, 42.5%), UNFIT to i-T (289, 42.1%), or unfit even to non-intensive therapy (non i-T) (FRAIL) (105, 15.3%). Biological characteristics and treatment actually received by patients [i-T, 274 patients (39.2%); non i-T, 134 (19.2%), best-supportive care (BSC), 291 (41.6%)] were recorded.

Results: "Fitness criteria" were easily applicable in 98.1% of patients. Overall concordance between "fitness criteria" and treatment actually received by patients was high (79.4%), 76% in FIT, 82.7% in UNFIT and 80% in FRAIL patients. Fitness independently predicted survival (median survival: 10.9, 4.2 and 1.8 months in FIT, UNFIT and FRAIL patients, respectively; p = 0.000), as confirmed also by multivariate analysis. In FRAIL patients, survival with any treatment was no better than with BSC, in UNFIT non i-T was as effective as i-T and better than BSC, and in FIT patients i-T was better than non i-T or BSC. In addition, a non-adverse risk AML, an ECOG PS <2, and receiving any treatment other than BSC had a favorable effect on survival (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: These simple "fitness criteria" applied at the time of diagnosis could facilitate, together with AML biologic risk evaluation, the choice of the most appropriate treatment intensity in older AML patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jgo.2020.10.004DOI Listing
May 2021

Real-world experience with decitabine as a first-line treatment in 306 elderly acute myeloid leukaemia patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy.

Hematol Oncol 2019 Oct 20;37(4):447-455. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

UO Ematologia e Trapianto Midollo Osseo, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Universitario San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.

Despite widespread use of decitabine to treat acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), data on its effectiveness and safety in the real-world setting are scanty. Thus, to analyze the performance of decitabine in clinical practice, we pooled together patient-level data of three multicentric observational studies conducted since 2013 throughout Italy, including 306 elderly AML patients (median age 75 years), unfit for intensive chemotherapy, treated with first-line decitabine therapy at the registered schedule of 20 mg/m /iv daily for 5 days every 4 weeks. Overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) curves, and multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality were computed. Overall, 1940 cycles of therapy were administered (median, 5 cycles/patient). A total of 148 subjects were responders and, therefore, ORR was 48.4%. Seventy-one patients (23.2%) had complete remission, 32 (10.5%) had partial remission, and 45 (14.7%) had haematologic improvement. Median OS was 11.6 months for patients with favourable-intermediate cytogenetic risk and 7.9 months for those with adverse cytogenetic risk. Median relapse-free survival after CR was 10.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7-16.0). In multivariate analysis, mortality was higher in patients with adverse cytogenetic risk (HR=1.58; 95% CI: 1.13-2.21) and increased continuously with white blood cell (WBC) count (HR=1.12; 95% CI: 1.06-1.18). A total of 183 infectious adverse events occurred in 136 patients mainly (>90%) within the first five cycles of therapy. This pooled analysis of clinical care studies confirmed, outside of clinical trials, the effectiveness of decitabine as first-line therapy for AML in elderly patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy. An adverse cytogenetic profile and a higher WBC count at diagnosis were, in this real life setting, unfavourable predictors of survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2663DOI Listing
October 2019

Siltuximab and hematologic malignancies. A focus in non Hodgkin lymphoma.

Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2017 Mar 9;26(3):367-373. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

a Division of Hematology , ASST Sette Laghi, Ospedale di Circolo , Varese , Italy.

Introduction: The role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in tumorigenesis and in particular in haematological malignancies is crucial. On the basis of the favourable results obtained in the subset of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), Siltuximab, a chimeric, human-murine, immunoglobulin (Ig) Gk monoclonal antibody directed against human IL-6 has been evaluated in haematological malignancies such as multiple myeloma, myelodisplastic syndromes and non Hodgkin lymphomas. Areas covered: This review discusses available data related to the role of IL-6 as a therapeutic target, the characteristics of Siltuximab in term pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics properties and a detailed analysis of the studies involving haematological malignancies with a peculiar focus on non Hodgkin lymphoma. Expert opinion: The results obtained with Siltuximab in haematological malignancies and in particular with non Hodgkin lymphoma are inferior to those obtained in MCD. The complex interaction between malignant clones, inflammatory background and host response could justify this difference. New interesting areas of study are the role of Siltuximab in early phase of multiple myeloma (smoldering multiple myeloma) and if there may be a possible future application in the treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13543784.2017.1288213DOI Listing
March 2017

PBSC mobilization in lymphoma patients: analysis of risk factors for collection failure and development of a predictive score based on the kinetics of circulating CD34+ cells and WBC after chemotherapy and G-CSF mobilization.

Hematol Oncol 2015 Sep 29;33(3):125-32. Epub 2014 May 29.

Division of Hematology, AOU San Giovanni Battista, Turin, Italy.

Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a potentially curative treatment of lymphoma, but peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization fails in some patients. PBSC mobilizing agents have recently been proved to improve the PBSC yield after a prior mobilization failure. Predictive parameters of mobilization failure allowing for a preemptive, more cost-effective use of such agents during the first mobilization attempt are still poorly defined, particularly during mobilization with chemotherapy + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of lymphoma patients who were candidates for ASCT, to identify factors influencing PBSC mobilization outcome. Premobilization parameters-age, histology, disease status, mobilizing protocol, and previous treatments-as well as white blood cell (WBC) and PBSC kinetics, markers potentially able to predict failure during the ongoing mobilization attempt, were analyzed in 415 consecutive mobilization procedures in 388 patients. We used chemotherapy + G-CSF in 411 (99%) of mobilization attempts and PBSC collection failed (<2 × 10(6) CD34+ PBSC/kg) in 13%. Multivariable analysis showed that only a low CD34+ PBSC count and CD34+ PBSC/WBC ratio, together with the use of nonplatinum-containing chemotherapy, independently predicted mobilization failure. Using these three parameters, we established a scoring system to predict risk of failure during mobilization ranging from 2 to 90%, thus allowing a selective use of a preemptive mobilization policy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2148DOI Listing
September 2015

Novel agents in indolent lymphomas.

Ther Adv Hematol 2013 Apr;4(2):133-48

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ospedale di Circolo and Fondazione Macchi, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy.

Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (iNHLs) include follicular lymphomas (FL), marginal-zone lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma. First-line standard therapy in advanced, symptomatic iNHL consists of rituximab-based immunochemotherapy. The recent rediscovery of the 'old' chemotherapeutic agent bendamustine, an alkylating agent with a peculiar mechanism of action, has added a new effective and well-tolerated option to the therapeutic armamentarium in iNHL, increasing response rates and duration. However, patients invariably relapse and subsequent active and well-tolerated agents are needed. In recent years a large number of new targeted agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical experimentation in FL and indolent nonfollicular lymphoma (iNFL), including the new monoclonal antibodies binding CD20 or other surface antigens, immunoconjugates and bispecific antibodies. Moreover novel agents directed against intracellular processes such as proteasome inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors and agents that target the tumour microenvironment, notably the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide, are under active clinical investigation. The development of these new drugs may change in the near future the approach to iNHL patients, leading to better tolerated and effective therapy regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2040620712466865DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3629754PMC
April 2013