Publications by authors named "Clarinda Nataria Sutanto"

5 Publications

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Enhancing the cardiovascular protective effects of a healthy dietary pattern with wolfberry (Lycium barbarum): A randomized controlled trial.

Am J Clin Nutr 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Department of Food Science & Technology, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

Background: The consumption of wolfberry (Lycium barbarum), a rich source of carotenoids and bioactive polysaccharides, may serve as a potential dietary strategy for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk management although limited studies examined its effects as whole fruits.

Objectives: To investigate the impact of wolfberry consumption as part of a healthy dietary pattern on vascular health-related outcomes and classical CVD risk factors in middle-aged and older adults in Singapore.

Methods: This is a 16-week, parallel design, randomized controlled trial. All participants (n = 40) received dietary counselling to follow healthy dietary pattern recommendations with the wolfberry group given additional instructions to cook and consume 15 g/d whole, dried wolfberry with their main meals. Biomarkers of vascular function (flow-mediated dilation, plasma total nitrate/nitrite, endothelin-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1), vascular structure (carotid intima-media thickness) and vascular regeneration (endothelial progenitor cell count, plasma angiopoietin 1 and angiopoietin 2), were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Serum lipid-lipoproteins and blood pressure were evaluated every 4 weeks.

Results: All participants showed an improved compliance toward the healthy dietary pattern. This was coupled with marked rises in total nitrate/nitrite concentrations (mean change wolfberry: 3.92 ± 1.73 nmol/mL; control: 5.01 ± 2.55 nmol/L) and reductions in endothelin-1 concentrations (wolfberry: -0.19 ± 0.06 pg/mL; control: -0.15 ± 0.08 pg/mL). Compared with the control which depicted no changes from baseline, the wolfberry group had a significantly higher HDL cholesterol (0.08 ± 0.04 mmol/L), as well as lower Framingham predicted long-term CVD risk (-0.8 ± 0.5%) and vascular age (-1.9 ± 1.0 y) postintervention. No differences were observed in the other vascular health-related outcomes.

Conclusions: In middle-aged and older adults, adherence to a healthy dietary pattern improves vascular tone. Incorporating wolfberry to the diet further improves blood lipid-lipoprotein profile and may lower long-term CVD risk. This study was registered at clinicatrials.gov as NCT03535844.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab062DOI Listing
May 2021

Wolfberry () Consumption with a Healthy Dietary Pattern Lowers Oxidative Stress in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Antioxidants (Basel) 2021 Apr 7;10(4). Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Food Science & Technology, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543, Singapore.

Incorporating zeaxanthin-rich wolfberry () into a healthy dietary pattern may augment its antioxidant potential. The present 16-week, parallel design randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the impact of adhering to a healthy dietary pattern, either with or without whole dried wolfberry (15 g/d) on oxidative stress status (plasma malondialdehyde and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α) in middle-aged and older adults. Changes to carotenoids status (plasma and skin carotenoids) and body composition were further evaluated to explore potential mechanisms which underlie the antioxidant properties of wolfberry. Plasma 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, plasma zeaxanthin and skin carotenoids status were significantly raised in the wolfberry consuming group ( = 22; < 0.05) compared to the control group which showed no changes ( = 18). Likewise in the wolfberry group only, inverse association was observed between the change values of plasma zeaxanthin and plasma 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (-0.21 (-0.43, 0.00) ng/µmol, regression coefficient (95% CI); = 0.05). Wolfberry consumption with a healthy dietary pattern may serve as a dietary strategy to attenuate lipid peroxidation among middle-aged and older adults who are at a heightened risk of oxidative stress induced age-related disorders. The antioxidant properties of wolfberry may be attributed to its rich zeaxanthin content.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antiox10040567DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8067708PMC
April 2021

Animal Protein versus Plant Protein in Supporting Lean Mass and Muscle Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Nutrients 2021 Feb 18;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Department of Food Science & Technology, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543, Singapore.

Although animal protein is usually considered to be a more potent stimulator of muscle protein synthesis than plant protein, the effect of protein source on lean mass and muscle strength needs to be systematically reviewed. This study aimed to examine potential differences in the effect of animal vs. plant protein on lean mass and muscle strength, and the possible influence of resistance exercise training (RET) and age. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, Scopus and CINAHL Plus with Full Text, and 3081 articles were screened. A total of 18 articles were selected for systematic review, of which, 16 were used for meta-analysis. Total protein intakes were generally above the recommended dietary allowance at the baseline and end of intervention. Results from the meta-analyses demonstrated that protein source did not affect changes in absolute lean mass or muscle strength. However, there was a favoring effect of animal protein on percent lean mass. RET had no influence on the results, while younger adults (<50 years) were found to gain absolute and percent lean mass with animal protein intake (weighted mean difference (WMD), 0.41 kg; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.74; WMD 0.50%; 95% CI 0.00 to 1.01). Collectively, animal protein tends to be more beneficial for lean mass than plant protein, especially in younger adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13020661DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7926405PMC
February 2021

Skin carotenoid status and plasma carotenoids: biomarkers of dietary carotenoids, fruits and vegetables for middle-aged and older Singaporean adults.

Br J Nutr 2021 Jan 14:1-10. Epub 2021 Jan 14.

Department of Food Science & Technology, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Science Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore.

Skin carotenoid status (SCS) measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) may serve as an emerging alternative measurement for dietary carotenoid, fruit and vegetable (FV) intake although its application had not been assessed in a middle-aged and older population in Asia. This cross-sectional study aims to concurrently examine the use of SCS and plasma carotenoids to measure FV and carotenoid intake in a middle-aged and older population, taking into consideration potential socio-demographic and nutritional confounders. The study recruited 103 middle-aged and older adults (mean age: 58 years) in Singapore. Dietary carotenoids and FV, plasma carotenoid concentration and SCS were measured using 3-d food records, HPLC and a biophotonic scanner which utilised RRS, respectively. Adjusted for statistically defined socio-demographic covariates sex, age, BMI, prescription medication and cigarette smoking, plasma carotenoids and SCS showed positive associations with dietary total carotenoids (βplasma: 0·020 (95 % CI 0·000, 0·040) µmol/l/mg, P = 0·05; βskin: 265 (95 % CI 23, 506) arbitrary units/mg, P = 0·03) and FV (βplasma: 0·076 (95 % CI 0·021, 0·132) µmol/l per FV serving, P = 0·008; βskin: 1036 (95 % CI 363, 1708) arbitrary units/FV serving, P = 0·003). The associations of SCS with dietary carotenoid and FV intake were null with the inclusion of dietary PUFA, fibre and vitamin C as nutritional covariates (P > 0·05). This suggests a potential influence of these nutritional factors on carotenoid circulation and deposition in the skin. In conclusion, SCS, similar to plasma carotenoids, may serve as a biomarker for both dietary carotenoid and FV intake in a middle-aged and older Singaporean population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114521000143DOI Listing
January 2021

Association of Sleep Quality and Macronutrient Distribution: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression.

Nutrients 2020 Jan 2;12(1). Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Food Science and Technology Programme, Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543, Singapore.

Sleep is involved in metabolic, emotional and cognitive regulation and is therefore an essential part of our health. Although an association between sleep quality and macronutrient intake has been reported, studies on the effect of macronutrient distribution with sleep quality are limited, and available results are inconsistent. In this study, we aim to assess the association between sleep quality and macronutrient distribution in healthy adults from systematically reviewed cross-sectional studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A total of 19 relevant articles were selected and it was observed that good sleepers (sleep duration ≥ 7 h, global sleep score ≤ 5, sleep latency ≤ 30 min and sleep efficiency >85%) had a higher energy distribution from dietary protein than poor sleepers. On the other hand, good sleepers showed a relatively lower percentage of energy from dietary carbohydrate and fat than poor sleepers. However, meta-regression analysis revealed no dose-dependent association between the macronutrient distributions and sleep duration. These results suggest that consuming a greater proportion of dietary protein may benefit on improving sleep quality in healthy adults. However, findings may be susceptible to reverse causality and additional RCTs are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12010126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7019667PMC
January 2020