Publications by authors named "Claretta Dupree"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Oncology Nurse Managers' Perceptions of Palliative Care and End-of-Life Communication.

J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 2019 May/Jun;36(3):178-190. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

6 Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA.

The purpose of this study was to describe pediatric oncology nurse managers' (NMs) perspectives of palliative care/end-of-life (PC/EOL) communication. The study, guided by group-as-a-whole theory and empirical phenomenology, was part of a larger, multisite study aimed at understanding pediatric oncology nurses' experiences of PC/EOL communication. Nurses were assigned to focus groups based on length or type of experience (i.e., nurses with <1, 2-5, or >5 years' work experience and NMs). Eleven NMs from three Midwestern pediatric hospitals with large oncology programs participated in one focus group. The participants' mean years of experience was 15.8 in nursing and 12 in pediatric oncology; 90% had a BSN or higher degree; all had supervisory responsibilities. The authors identified 2,912 meaning statements, which were then analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Findings include NMs' overall experience of "Fostering a Caring Climate," which includes three core themes: (1) Imprint of Initial Grief Experiences and Emotions; (2) Constant Vigilance: Assessing and Optimizing Family-Centered Care; and (3) Promoting a Competent, Thoughtful, and Caring Workforce. Findings indicate that pediatric oncology NMs draw on their own PC/EOL experiences and their nursing management knowledge to address the PC/EOL care learning needs of nursing staff and patient/family needs. NMs need additional resources to support nursing staff's PC/EOL communication training, including specific training in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs and national and hospital-based training programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1043454219835448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7197215PMC
May 2020

Calling Out Implicit Racial Bias as a Harm in Pediatric Care.

Camb Q Healthc Ethics 2016 07;25(3):540-52

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0963180116000190DOI Listing
July 2016

Novice Nurses' Experiences With Palliative and End-of-Life Communication.

J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 2015 Jul-Aug;32(4):240-52. Epub 2015 Jan 2.

Indiana University, School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Health care providers recognize that delivery of effective communication with family members of children with life-threatening illnesses is essential to palliative and end-of-life care (PC/EOL). Parents value the presence of nurses during PC/EOL of their dying child. It is vital that nurses, regardless of their years of work experience, are competent and feel comfortable engaging family members of dying children in PC/EOL discussions. This qualitative-descriptive study used focus groups to explore the PC/EOL communication perspectives of 14 novice pediatric oncology nurses (eg, with less than 1 year of experience). Audio-taped focus group discussions were reviewed to develop the following 6 theme categories: (a) Sacred Trust to Care for the Child and Family, (b) An Elephant in the Room, (c) Struggling with Emotional Unknowns, (d) Kaleidoscope of Death: Patterns and Complexity, (e) Training Wheels for Connectedness: Critical Mentors during PC/EOL of Children, and (f) Being Present with an Open Heart: Ways to Maintain Hope and Minimize Emotional Distress. To date, this is the first study to focus on PC/EOL communication perspectives of novice pediatric oncology nurses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1043454214555196DOI Listing
September 2016

Staff experiences with end-of-life care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

J Palliat Med 2008 Sep;11(7):986-90

Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, USA.

Unlabelled: The purposes of this study were to describe the experiences of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) staff caring for a child who dies, and to determine whether responses included unprompted indications of moral distress as described in the literature. This qualitative, descriptive study consisted of semistructured interviews conducted with professional caregivers of a child who died in a large, multidisciplinary PICU. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Main results Interviews (n = 32) were conducted with 29 staff members regarding 8 patient deaths. Participants included nurses, physicians, and psychosocial support personnel. The overall tone of the interviews was positive, and participants expressed satisfaction with their work and the work of their colleagues. The major themes of staff members experiences were (1) importance of communication, (2) accommodating the wishes of others despite personal preferences, (3) ambiguity about the use of technology, (4) sadness, and (5) emotional support. Descriptions of moral distress were seen infrequently. Many welcomed the sadness they experienced as a sign of their humanity and emotional availability, but did not feel adequately supported in dealing with their grief.

Conclusions: The experience of caring for a child who dies in the PICU is multifaceted. Grief, rather than moral distress, was the dominant psychological response of caregivers. Future research could focus on enhancing communication and emotional support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2007.0283DOI Listing
September 2008