Publications by authors named "Clare M Stocker"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

"Sibling relationships in older adulthood: Links with loneliness and well-being": Correction.

J Fam Psychol 2020 Aug 23;34(5):522. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences.

Reports an error in "Sibling relationships in older adulthood: Links with loneliness and well-being" by Clare M. Stocker, Megan Gilligan, Eric T. Klopack, Katherine J. Conger, Richard P. Lanthier, Tricia K. Neppl, Catherine Walker O'Neal and K. A. S. Wickrama (, 2020[Mar], Vol 34[2], 175-185). In the original article, the value is incorrect in the following sentence in the first paragraph of the Predictors of Individual Differences in Older Adults' Sibling Relationships section of the Results: "The global -statistic for warmth was significant ( = 16.55, = 3, 632, p < .001)." The correct value is " = 3, 601." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2019-46911-001). Researchers have documented associations between family relationships and a variety of well-being outcomes. Yet, sibling relationships, the longest lasting relationships in most people's lives, have received very little research attention beyond young adulthood. The goals of the current study were to: provide descriptive information about sibling relationships in later adulthood, investigate predictors of individual differences in sibling relationship quality, and examine associations among sibling relationship quality, loneliness, and well-being in later adulthood. The sample included 608 older adults (329 men, 279 women) who were 64.6 years old ( = 4.58) on average. Participants provided self-report data about their relationships and well-being. Results showed that older adults reported high levels of sibling warmth and low levels of sibling conflict and parental favoritism. Sister-sister pairs had warmer sibling relationships than other gender-compositions. Sibling conflict and parental favoritism were positively associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, hostility, and loneliness. Sibling warmth was negatively associated with loneliness. Loneliness partially mediated the associations between sibling relationship quality and well-being. Results from this study highlight the importance of sibling relationships in older adults' health and well-being. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000668DOI Listing
August 2020

Sibling relationships in older adulthood: Links with loneliness and well-being.

J Fam Psychol 2020 Mar 15;34(2):175-185. Epub 2019 Aug 15.

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences.

Researchers have documented associations between family relationships and a variety of well-being outcomes. Yet, sibling relationships, the longest lasting relationships in most people's lives, have received very little research attention beyond young adulthood. The goals of the current study were to: provide descriptive information about sibling relationships in later adulthood, investigate predictors of individual differences in sibling relationship quality, and examine associations among sibling relationship quality, loneliness, and well-being in later adulthood. The sample included 608 older adults (329 men, 279 women) who were 64.6 years old ( = 4.58) on average. Participants provided self-report data about their relationships and well-being. Results showed that older adults reported high levels of sibling warmth and low levels of sibling conflict and parental favoritism. Sister-sister pairs had warmer sibling relationships than other gender-compositions. Sibling conflict and parental favoritism were positively associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, hostility, and loneliness. Sibling warmth was negatively associated with loneliness. Loneliness partially mediated the associations between sibling relationship quality and well-being. Results from this study highlight the importance of sibling relationships in older adults' health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000586DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7012710PMC
March 2020

Parenting and adolescents' psychological adjustment: Longitudinal moderation by adolescents' genetic sensitivity.

Dev Psychopathol 2017 10 28;29(4):1289-1304. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

University of California,Davis.

We examined whether adolescents' genetic sensitivity, measured by a polygenic index score, moderated the longitudinal associations between parenting and adolescents' psychological adjustment. The sample included 323 mothers, fathers, and adolescents (177 female, 146 male; Time 1 [T1] average age = 12.61 years, SD = 0.54 years; Time 2 [T2] average age = 13.59 years, SD = 0.59 years). Parents' warmth and hostility were rated by trained, independent observers using videotapes of family discussions. Adolescents reported their symptoms of anxiety, depressed mood, and hostility at T1 and T2. The results from autoregressive linear regression models showed that adolescents' genetic sensitivity moderated associations between observations of both mothers' and fathers' T1 parenting and adolescents' T2 composite maladjustment, depression, anxiety, and hostility. Compared to adolescents with low genetic sensitivity, adolescents with high genetic sensitivity had worse adjustment outcomes when parenting was low on warmth and high on hostility. When parenting was characterized by high warmth and low hostility, adolescents with high genetic sensitivity had better adjustment outcomes than their counterparts with low genetic sensitivity. The results support the differential susceptibility model and highlight the complex ways that genes and environment interact to influence development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579416001310DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5538938PMC
October 2017

Longitudinal associations between parents' hostility and siblings' externalizing behavior in the context of marital discord.

J Fam Psychol 2008 Apr;22(2):231-40

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA.

This study examined longitudinal associations between parents' hostility and siblings' externalizing behavior in the context of interparental discord. The sample included 116 families (mothers, fathers, 2 siblings) assessed in middle childhood, when siblings were, on average, 8 and 10 years old, and in adolescence, at average ages of 14 and 16 years. Parents reported on their hostility toward each child and on each child's externalizing problems. Raters observed interparental hostility, and parents rated their marital quality. Results indicated both within-family and between-families effects. Specifically, the child who received more parental hostility than his or her sibling showed greater increases in externalizing problems than his or her sibling; this association was moderated by marital discord. In addition, the child who exhibited more behavioral problems than his or her sibling received greater increases in hostile mothering than did his or her sibling. Between-families effects were evident, in that children's externalizing problems were associated with increases in mothers' hostility toward both children in the family. Results support transactional models of development and family systems theory.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.22.2.231DOI Listing
April 2008

Longitudinal associations between hostility in adolescents' family relationships and friendships and hostility in their romantic relationships.

J Fam Psychol 2007 Sep;21(3):490-7

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, CO 80208, USA.

This study examined longitudinal predictors of hostility in adolescents' romantic relationships. The sample included 110 adolescents and their parents from 72 families. Observational measures of parents' marital hostility and parent-child hostility and self-reports of hostility in close friendships were collected when adolescents ranged from 14 to 16 years old. Three years later, when they were 17 to 19 years old, adolescents reported on the hostility in their romantic relationships. Results indicated that hostility in parents' marital relationships and in adolescents' friendships accounted for independent variance in hostility in adolescents' later romantic relationships. Results highlight the importance of both family relationships and friendships for predicting hostility in adolescents' romantic relationships over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.21.3.490DOI Listing
September 2007

Changes in children's appraisals of marital discord from childhood through adolescence.

J Fam Psychol 2007 Sep;21(3):416-425

Department of Psychology, University of Denver.

The study examined how children's appraisals of marital conflict (threat and self-blame) changed across development, whether changes in exposure to marital conflict were associated with corresponding changes in appraisals, and whether the appraisal process was different for boys and girls. Data were collected on 112 families (224 children) at 4 time points. At each wave, children (mean ages ranged from 8 to 19) provided information on their appraisals of marital conflict, and parents provided information on children's exposure to marital conflict. Results indicated that appraisals of threat declined rapidly from childhood to adolescence and then declined less rapidly across adolescence; appraisals of self-blame showed little change over time. Second, changes in exposure to marital discord covaried with changes in threat over time, but not with changes in self-blame. Finally, boys experienced more self-blame than girls on average, and gender moderated the association between exposure to marital discord and threat. Results suggest that development, exposure to marital conflict, and gender are important in determining why some children appraise their parents' disputes negatively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.21.3.416DOI Listing
September 2007

Can spouses provide knowledge of each other's communication patterns? A study of self-reports, spouses' reports, and observational coding.

Fam Process 2006 Dec;45(4):499-511

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA.

The purposes of this study were (1) to assess individuals' self-reports of communication and their reports about their spouses' communication in order to examine the congruence of spousal views and (2) to investigate whether each report provided unique information about observed marital interactions. These associations were evaluated in a sample of 119 longtime married couples. The Verbal Aggression and Cooperation subscales from the Conflicts and Problem-Solving Scales were used as measures of negative and positive aspects of communication. The findings indicated that self-reports of both verbal aggression and cooperation were strongly associated with the same individual's report of his or her spouse's verbal aggression and cooperation. Conversely, self-reports were only moderately associated with reports made by spouses (e.g., the husband's report of his wife's communication). Hence, within-reporter agreement was higher than between-reporter agreement about marital communication. When entered into regression models, reports made by spouses, but not self-reports, explained unique variance in observations of marital hostility and affection. There was one exception: Wife self-report of verbal aggression explained unique variance in coders' ratings of wife hostility, controlling for husband report of wife verbal aggression. Findings indicate the importance of assessing partners' views of one another's communication for the most accurate portrayal of marital interactions. Implications for research and clinical work are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1545-5300.2006.00185.xDOI Listing
December 2006

Associations between family cohesion and adolescent siblings' externalizing behavior.

J Fam Psychol 2006 Dec;20(4):663-9

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA.

This study asked whether family cohesion, a measure of whole family functioning, was associated with adolescent siblings' externalizing problems, controlling for the quality of each sibling's relationship with his or her parents. The sample included 93 families (mothers, fathers, and 2 adolescent siblings). Family cohesion was measured from videotaped observations of parents and 2 of their adolescent children discussing family conflict and limit setting. Adolescents reported on hostility in their relationships with mothers and fathers, and parents rated adolescents' externalizing problems. Results from multilevel modeling showed that family cohesion was negatively associated with adolescents' externalizing problems, independent of variance explained by hostility in dyadic parent-child relationships. Results support family systems theory, suggesting that whole family functioning has implications for adolescents' behavioral problems beyond those accounted for by dyadic family relationships.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.20.4.663DOI Listing
December 2006

Longitudinal associations between sibling relationship quality, parental differential treatment, and children's adjustment.

J Fam Psychol 2005 Dec;19(4):550-9

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, CO 80208, USA.

This study examined associations between changes in sibling relationships and changes in parental differential treatment and corresponding changes in children's adjustment. One hundred thirty-three families were assessed at 3 time points. Parents rated children's externalizing problems, and children reported on sibling relationship quality, parental differential treatment, and depressive symptoms. On average, older siblings were 10, 12, and 16 years old, and younger siblings were 8, 10, and 14 years old at Waves 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Results from hierarchical linear modeling indicated that as sibling relationships improved over time, children's depressive symptoms decreased over time. In addition, as children were less favored over their siblings over time, children's externalizing problems increased over time. Findings highlight the developmental interplay between the sibling context and children's adjustment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.19.4.550DOI Listing
December 2005

Siblings' differential experiences of marital conflict and differences in psychological adjustment.

J Fam Psychol 2003 Sep;17(3):339-50

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208, USA.

The present study examined whether siblings experience marital conflict differently and whether such differences, if present, were associated with differences in their adjustment. Self-report data about marital conflict, children's depressed mood, behavioral conduct, and externalizing problems were obtained from 122 sibling pairs (mean ages = 10 and 12 years) and their parents. Results indicated that siblings were significantly different in exposure to and appraisals of marital conflict. Differences in siblings' exposure to marital conflict were significantly correlated with differences in their depressed mood, behavioral conduct, and externalizing problems. Differences in siblings' feelings of self-blame for marital conflict were significantly correlated with differences in their depressed mood and behavioral conduct. Children who experienced more marital conflict than their siblings had more adjustment problems than their siblings. These results highlight the importance of studying siblings' unique experiences of marital conflict to better understand its impact on children's adjustment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.3.339DOI Listing
September 2003

Sibling conflict in middle childhood predicts children's adjustment in early adolescence.

J Fam Psychol 2002 Mar;16(1):50-7

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208, USA.

Associations between sibling conflict in middle childhood and psychological adjustment in early adolescence were studied in a sample of 80 boys and 56 girls. Parents and children provided self-report data about family relationships and children's adjustment. Parents' hostility to children was assessed from videotaped interactions. Results showed that sibling conflict at Time 1 predicted increases in children's anxiety, depressed mood, and delinquent behavior 2 years later. Moreover, earlier sibling conflict at Time 1 accounted for unique variance in young adolescents' Time 2 anxiety, depressed mood, and delinquent behavior above and beyond the variance explained by earlier maternal hostility and marital conflict. Children's adjustment at Time 1 did not predict sibling conflict at Time 2. Results highlight the unique significance of the earlier sibling relationship for young adolescents' psychological adjustment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0893-3200.16.1.50DOI Listing
March 2002
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