Publications by authors named "Claes Martin"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

RebiQoL: A randomized trial of telemedicine patient support program for health-related quality of life and adherence in people with MS treated with Rebif.

PLoS One 2019 5;14(7):e0218453. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

RebiQoL was a phase IV multicenter randomized study to assess the impact of a telemedicine patient support program (MSP) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) being administered with Rebif with the RebiSmart device. The primary endpoint was to assess the impact of MSP compared to patients only receiving technical support for RebiSmart on HRQoL at 12 months, using the psychological part of Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29), in patients administered with Rebif. A total of 97 patients diagnosed with RRMS were screened for participation in the study of which 3 patients did not fulfill the eligibility criteria and 1 patient withdrew consent. Of the 93 randomized patients, 46 were randomized to MSP and 47 to Technical support only. The demographic characteristics of the patients were well-balanced in the two arms. There were no statistical differences (linear mixed model) in any of the primary (difference of 0.48, 95% CI: -8.30-9.25, p = 0.91) or secondary outcomes (p>0.05). Although the study was slightly underpowered, there was a trend towards better adherence in the MSP group (OR 3.5, 95% CI 0.85-14.40, p = 0.08) although not statistically significant. No unexpected adverse events occurred. This study did not show a statistically significant effect of the particular form of teleintervention used in this study on HRQoL as compared to pure technical support, for MS patients already receiving Rebif with the RebiSmart device. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01791244.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0218453PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611587PMC
February 2020

Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive multiple sclerosis: the Swedish experience.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2014 Oct 19;85(10):1116-21. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Department of Neurology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a viable option for treatment of aggressive multiple sclerosis (MS). No randomised controlled trial has been performed, and thus, experiences from systematic and sustained follow-up of treated patients constitute important information about safety and efficacy. In this observational study, we describe the characteristics and outcome of the Swedish patients treated with HSCT for MS.

Methods: Neurologists from the major hospitals in Sweden filled out a follow-up form with prospectively collected data. Fifty-two patients were identified in total; 48 were included in the study and evaluated for safety and side effects; 41 patients had at least 1 year of follow-up and were further analysed for clinical and radiological outcome. In this cohort, 34 patients (83%) had relapsing-remitting MS, and mean follow-up time was 47 months.

Results: At 5 years, relapse-free survival was 87%; MRI event-free survival 85%; expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score progression-free survival 77%; and disease-free survival (no relapses, no new MRI lesions and no EDSS progression) 68%. Presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions prior to HSCT was associated with a favourable outcome (disease-free survival 79% vs 46%, p=0.028). There was no mortality. The most common long-term side effects were herpes zoster reactivation (15%) and thyroid disease (8.4%).

Conclusions: HSCT is a very effective treatment of inflammatory active MS and can be performed with a high degree of safety at experienced centres.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2013-307207DOI Listing
October 2014

Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis.

Nat Genet 2013 Nov 29;45(11):1353-60. Epub 2013 Sep 29.

1] John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. [2].

Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P < 1.0 × 10(-4)). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), 3 of which we found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants at 103 discrete loci outside of the major histocompatibility complex. With high-resolution Bayesian fine mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalog of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.2770DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3832895PMC
November 2013

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy after natalizumab monotherapy.

N Engl J Med 2009 Sep;361(11):1081-7

Neurology Unit, Division of Internal Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

We describe progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) caused by infection with human polyomavirus JC virus in a patient with multiple sclerosis who was treated with natalizumab. The first PML symptoms appeared after 14 monthly infusions of the drug. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a presumed multiple sclerosis lesion, and JC virus DNA was not detected on polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay of cerebrospinal fluid. The patient's symptoms worsened, and the diagnosis of PML was established with a more sensitive quantitative PCR assay after 16 infusions of natalizumab. Plasma exchange was used to accelerate clearance of natalizumab. Approximately 3 weeks after plasma exchange, an immune-reconstitution inflammatory syndrome appeared. JC virus DNA was no longer detectable on quantitative PCR assay, and the patient's symptoms improved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0810316DOI Listing
September 2009

T Cell Ig- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) and TIM-1 molecules are differentially expressed on human Th1 and Th2 cells and in cerebrospinal fluid-derived mononuclear cells in multiple sclerosis.

J Immunol 2004 Jun;172(11):7169-76

Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neuroimmunology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

T cell Ig- and mucin-domain-containing molecules (TIMs) comprise a recently described family of molecules expressed on T cells. TIM-3 has been shown to be expressed on murine Th1 cell clones and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Th1-driven experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In contrast, association of TIM-1 polymorphisms to Th2-related airway hyperreactivity has been suggested in mice. The TIM molecules have not been investigated in human Th1- or Th2-mediated diseases. Using real-time (TaqMan) RT-PCR, we show that human Th1 lines expressed higher TIM-3 mRNA levels, while Th2 lines demonstrated a higher expression of TIM-1. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear cells obtained from patients with multiple sclerosis revealed significantly higher mRNA expression of TIM-1 compared with controls. Moreover, higher TIM-1 expression was associated with clinical remissions and low expression of IFN-gamma mRNA in cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear cells. In contrast, expression of TIM-3 correlated well with high expression of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. These data imply the differential expression of human TIM molecules by Th1 and Th2 cells and may suggest their differential involvement in different phases of a human autoimmune disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.172.11.7169DOI Listing
June 2004

Painful and non-painful neuropathy in HIV-infected patients: an analysis of somatosensory nerve function.

Eur J Pain 2003 ;7(1):23-31

Department of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Fifteen to 50% of AIDS-patients suffer from distal predominantly sensory neuropathy (DSP), which is commonly associated with painful symptoms. In the present study, we have focused on the function of fine calibre nerve channels, in 36 consecutive HIV-1-infected patients with painful (PPN) (n=20; 54%) and non-painful (PN) (n=16) sensory neuropathy, assessed by clinical, quantitative thermal testing (QTT) (31/36), and peripheral nerve conduction examination (32/36). Control QTT data were obtained from 49 healthy subjects with a corresponding age- and sex distribution. Demographics, antiviral treatment, immunological status, and nerve conduction examination did not differ between patients with and without painful symptoms. Hypoaesthesia to warmth, cold, and heat pain was observed in both neuropathy groups when compared to healthy controls. However, the perception threshold to warmth was more often impaired (p<0.01) and the level of impairment was more pronounced (p<0.001) in patients with painful neuropathy. Furthermore, increased pain sensitivity to cold was found only in patients with painful symptoms (p<0.05). An abnormal outcome of any QTT parameter was found in all patients with pain, but only among 62% of patients without pain, p<0.01, and the cumulative frequency of abnormalities in any of the four thermal percepts (warmth, cold, heat pain, and cold pain) was higher in patients with painful symptoms, p<0.0001. This study demonstrates a more pronounced impairment of C-fibre-mediated innocuous warm perception in patients with painful neuropathy, which in the setting of impaired or absent heat pain perception suggests a more generalised loss of function in somatosensory C-fibre channels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1090-3801(02)00053-8DOI Listing
June 2003