Publications by authors named "Clémentine Lepinay"

7 Publications

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Successional Development of Fungal Communities Associated with Decomposing Deadwood in a Natural Mixed Temperate Forest.

J Fungi (Basel) 2021 May 25;7(6). Epub 2021 May 25.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220 Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Deadwood represents an important carbon stock and contributes to climate change mitigation. Wood decomposition is mainly driven by fungal communities. Their composition is known to change during decomposition, but it is unclear how environmental factors such as wood chemistry affect these successional patterns through their effects on dominant fungal taxa. We analysed the deadwood of and across a deadwood succession series of >40 years in a natural fir-beech forest in the Czech Republic to describe the successional changes in fungal communities, fungal abundance and enzymatic activities and to link these changes to environmental variables. The fungal communities showed high levels of spatial variability and beta diversity. In young deadwood, fungal communities showed higher similarity among tree species, and fungi were generally less abundant, less diverse and less active than in older deadwood. pH and the carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) were the best predictors of the fungal community composition, and they affected the abundance of half of the dominant fungal taxa. The relative abundance of most of the dominant taxa tended to increase with increasing pH or C/N, possibly indicating that acidification and atmospheric N deposition may shift the community composition towards species that are currently less dominant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jof7060412DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8228407PMC
May 2021

GlobalFungi, a global database of fungal occurrences from high-throughput-sequencing metabarcoding studies.

Sci Data 2020 07 13;7(1):228. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Fungi are key players in vital ecosystem services, spanning carbon cycling, decomposition, symbiotic associations with cultivated and wild plants and pathogenicity. The high importance of fungi in ecosystem processes contrasts with the incompleteness of our understanding of the patterns of fungal biogeography and the environmental factors that drive those patterns. To reduce this gap of knowledge, we collected and validated data published on the composition of soil fungal communities in terrestrial environments including soil and plant-associated habitats and made them publicly accessible through a user interface at https://globalfungi.com . The GlobalFungi database contains over 600 million observations of fungal sequences across > 17 000 samples with geographical locations and additional metadata contained in 178 original studies with millions of unique nucleotide sequences (sequence variants) of the fungal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 representing fungal species and genera. The study represents the most comprehensive atlas of global fungal distribution, and it is framed in such a way that third-party data addition is possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-020-0567-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359306PMC
July 2020

A meta-analysis of global fungal distribution reveals climate-driven patterns.

Nat Commun 2019 11 13;10(1):5142. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

The evolutionary and environmental factors that shape fungal biogeography are incompletely understood. Here, we assemble a large dataset consisting of previously generated mycobiome data linked to specific geographical locations across the world. We use this dataset to describe the distribution of fungal taxa and to look for correlations with different environmental factors such as climate, soil and vegetation variables. Our meta-study identifies climate as an important driver of different aspects of fungal biogeography, including the global distribution of common fungi as well as the composition and diversity of fungal communities. In our analysis, fungal diversity is concentrated at high latitudes, in contrast with the opposite pattern previously shown for plants and other organisms. Mycorrhizal fungi appear to have narrower climatic tolerances than pathogenic fungi. We speculate that climate change could affect ecosystem functioning because of the narrow climatic tolerances of key fungal taxa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13164-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6853883PMC
November 2019

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and associated microbial communities from dry grassland do not improve plant growth on abandoned field soil.

Oecologia 2018 03 10;186(3):677-689. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Zámek 1, 252 43, Průhonice, Czech Republic.

After abandonment of agricultural fields, some grassland plant species colonize these sites with a frequency equivalent to dry grasslands (generalists) while others are missing or underrepresented in abandoned fields (specialists). We aimed to understand the inability of specialists to spread on abandoned fields by exploring whether performance of generalists and specialists depended on soil abiotic and/or biotic legacy. We performed a greenhouse experiment with 12 species, six specialists and six generalists. The plants were grown in sterile soil from dry grassland or abandoned field inoculated with microbial communities from one or the other site. Plant growth, abundance of mycorrhizal structures and plant response to inoculation were evaluated. We focused on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), one of the most important parts of soil communities affecting plant performance. The abandoned field soil negatively affected plant growth, but positively affected plant response to inoculation. The AMF community from both sites differed in infectivity and taxa frequencies. The lower AMF taxa frequency in the dry grassland soil suggested a lack of functional complementarity. Despite the fact that dry grassland AMF produced more arbuscules, the dry grassland inoculum did not improve phosphorus nutrition of specialists contrary to the abandoned field inoculum. Inoculum origin did not affect phosphorus nutrition of generalists. The lower effectiveness of the dry grassland microbial community toward plant performance excludes its inoculation in the abandoned field soil as a solution to allow settlement of specialists. Still, the distinct response of specialists and generalists to inoculation suggested that they differ in AMF responsiveness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-4054-6DOI Listing
March 2018

Duration of the conditioning phase affects the results of plant-soil feedback experiments via soil chemical properties.

Oecologia 2018 02 6;186(2):459-470. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Zámek 1, 252 43, Průhonice, Czech Republic.

Plant-soil feedback (PSF) is a fundamental mechanism explaining plant community composition. Two-phase experiments, i.e., conditioning and feedback, represent a common methodology to study PSF. The duration of the conditioning phase varies among studies and the PSF observed is often explained by its biotic component. Little is known about the temporal variation of PSF and its abiotic component. As early life stages are crucial for plant establishment, we grew Rorippa austriaca in soil conditioned over 2, 4, 6 or 8 weeks by a conspecific or a co-occurring species, Agrostis capillaris. For each conditioning duration, we analysed the soil chemical properties and the direction and intensity of intra- or inter-specific feedbacks. With increasing duration, the negative intra- and inter-specific feedbacks became stronger and weaker, respectively. The inter-specific feedback was more negative than the intra-specific feedback at 2 weeks and this reversed thereafter. The Mg content decreased with conditioning duration whatever the conditioning species was. With increasing duration, conditioning by R. austriaca strongly decreased pH, while A. capillaris did not affect pH. The K and P contents were not affected by the conditioning duration and were higher in R. austriaca soil than in A. capillaris soil. Our results suggest that not only conditioning species but also duration of conditioning phase may affect the magnitude of PSF. The changes in soil chemical properties linked to the conditioning species or the conditioning phase duration may drive the feedbacks by affecting plant growth directly or via the interacting microbial communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-4033-yDOI Listing
February 2018

Interaction between Medicago truncatula and Pseudomonas fluorescens: evaluation of costs and benefits across an elevated atmospheric CO(2).

PLoS One 2012 21;7(9):e45740. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

INRA, UMR 1347 Agroécologie, Dijon, France.

Soil microorganisms play a key role in both plants nutrition and health. Their relation with plant varies from mutualism to parasitism, according to the balance of costs and benefits for the two partners of the interaction. These interactions involved the liberation of plant organic compounds via rhizodeposition. Modification of atmospheric CO(2) concentration may affect rhizodeposition and as a consequence trophic interactions that bind plants and microorganisms. Positive effect of elevated CO(2) on plants are rather well known but consequences for micoorganisms and their interactions with plants are still poorly understood. A gnotobiotic system has been developed to study the interaction between Medicago truncatula Jemalong J5 and the mutualistic bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens strain C7R12 under two atmospheric CO(2) concentrations: ambient (365 ppm) versus enriched (750 ppm). Costs and benefits for each partner have been determined over time by measuring plant development and growth, the C and N contents of the various plant parts and the density of the bacteria in rhizosphere compartments. Following the increase in CO(2), there was a beneficial effect of P. fluorescens C7R12 on development, vegetative growth, and C/N content of M. truncatula. Concerning plant reproduction, an early seed production was noticed in presence of the bacterial strain combined with increased atmospheric CO(2) conditions. Paradoxically, this transient increase in seed production was correlated with a decrease in bacterial density in the rhizosphere soil, revealing a cost of increased CO(2) for the bacterial strain. This shift of costs-benefits ratio disappeared later during the plant growth. In conclusion, the increase in CO(2) concentration modifies transiently the cost-benefit balance in favor of the plant. These results may be explained either by a competition between the two partners or a change in bacterial physiology. The ecosystem functioning depends on the stability of many plant-microbe associations that abiotic factors can disrupt.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0045740PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3448688PMC
February 2013
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