Publications by authors named "Cindy Sprecher"

3 Publications

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Rapid multiplex DNA amplification on an inexpensive microdevice for human identification via short tandem repeat analysis.

Anal Chim Acta 2017 Aug 15;980:41-49. Epub 2017 May 15.

Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, United States; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, United States; Department of Pathology, University of Virginia Health Science Center, Charlottesville, VA 22904, United States; TeGrex Technologies, Charlottesville, VA 22904, United States. Electronic address:

Forensic DNA analysis requires several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and separation of PCR fragments. Intuitively, there are numerous situations where it would be beneficial to speed up the overall DNA analysis process; in this work, we focus on the most time-consuming component in the analysis pipeline, namely the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Primers were specially designed to target 10 human genomic loci, all yielding amplicons shorter than 350 bases, for ease of downstream integration with on-board microchip electrophoresis. Primer concentrations were adjusted specifically for microdevice amplification, resulting in well-balanced short tandem repeat (STR) profiles. Furthermore, studies were performed to push the limits of the DNA polymerase to achieve rapid, multiplexed PCR on various substrates, including transparent and black polyethylene terephthalate (Pe), and with two distinct adhesives, toner and heat sensitive adhesive (HSA). Rapid STR-based multiplexed PCR amplification is demonstrated in 15 min on a Pe microdevice using a custom-built system for fluid flow control and thermocycling for the full 10-plex, and in 10 min for a smaller multiplex consisting of six core CODIS loci plus Amelogenin with amplicons shorter than 200bp. Lastly, preliminary studies indicate the capability of this PCR microdevice platform to be integrated with both upstream DNA extraction, and downstream microchip electrophoresis. This, coupled to the use of reagents that are compatible with lyophilization (lyo-compatible) for PCR, represents the potential for a fully integrated rotationally-driven microdevice for complete forensic DNA analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2017.04.051DOI Listing
August 2017

Post-injection hybridization of complementary DNA strands on capillary electrophoresis platforms: a novel solution for dsDNA artifacts.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2008 Sep 5;2(4):257-73. Epub 2008 May 5.

Promega Corporation, Madison, WI 53711, USA.

Several laboratories have reported the occurrence of a split or n-1 peak at the vWA locus in PowerPlex 16 and PowerPlex ES amplification products separated on 4- and 16-capillary electrophoresis instruments. The root cause of this artifact is post-PCR reannealing of the unlabeled, unincorporated vWA primer to the 3'-end of the tetramethylrhodamine (TMR)-labeled strand of the vWA amplicon. This reannealing occurs in the capillary post-electrokinetic injection. The split peak is eliminated by incorporation into the loading cocktail of a sacrificial hybridization sequence (SHS) oligonucleotide that is complementary to the vWA primer. The SHS preferentially anneals to the primer instead of the TMR-labeled strand of the vWA amplicon. In addition, the n-10/n-18 artifact that may be seen at the vWA locus was determined to be due to double-stranded amplicon formed post-electrokinetic injection into the capillary. This was also eliminated by adding in two Complementary Oligo Targets (COT1 and COT2) in addition to the SHS oligonucleotide into the loading cocktail. These three oligonucleotides are complementary to the 33 bases at the 5'-end of the unlabeled vWA amplicon strand and the 60 bases at its 3'-end and therefore compete for hybridization to the TMR-labeled amplicon strand. Incorporation of these three oligonucleotides in the Internal Lane Standard 600 (ILS600) eliminate both the split peak and n-10/n-18 artifact in PowerPlex 16 and PowerPlex ES amplification products without affecting sizing of alleles at the vWA locus or any locus in the PowerPlex 16, PowerPlex Y, PowerPlex ES, AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus ID, AmpFlSTR Cofiler, and AmpFlSTR SGM Plus kits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2008.03.005DOI Listing
September 2008

Interleukin 31, a cytokine produced by activated T cells, induces dermatitis in mice.

Nat Immunol 2004 Jul 6;5(7):752-60. Epub 2004 Jun 6.

Department of Immunology, ZymoGenetics, 1201 Eastlake Avenue East, Seattle, Washington 98102, USA.

T cell-derived cytokines are important in the development of an effective immune response, but when dysregulated they can promote disease. Here we identify a four-helix bundle cytokine we have called interleukin 31 (IL-31), which is preferentially produced by T helper type 2 cells. IL-31 signals through a receptor composed of IL-31 receptor A and oncostatin M receptor. Expression of IL-31 receptor A and oncostatin M receptor mRNA was induced in activated monocytes, whereas epithelial cells expressed both mRNAs constitutively. Transgenic mice overexpressing IL-31 developed severe pruritus, alopecia and skin lesions. Furthermore, IL-31 receptor expression was increased in diseased tissues derived from an animal model of airway hypersensitivity. These data indicate that IL-31 may be involved in promoting the dermatitis and epithelial responses that characterize allergic and non-allergic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ni1084DOI Listing
July 2004