Publications by authors named "Chureerat Puttanlek"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The effect of hydrolysis of cassava starch on the characteristics of microspheres prepared by an emulsification-crosslinking method.

Int J Biol Macromol 2020 Oct 15;161:939-946. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Department of Agro-Industrial, Food, and Environmental Technology, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok 10240, Thailand.

Cassava starch was hydrolyzed with 2.2 M hydrochloric acid for different periods of time. The soluble starches obtained were subsequently used for microsphere preparation by a water-in-water emulsion crosslinking technique. The average chain lengths of starches hydrolyzed for 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h were 122.0, 106.3, 65.4, 33.2, and 28.3, respectively. Starches hydrolyzed for 6 and 12 h did not form regular shaped microspheres, while those hydrolyzed for 24, 36, and 48 h mostly formed separate spherical-shaped microparticles with average particle sizes of 14.6, 10.1, and 10.4 μm, respectively. The swelling power of starch microspheres (SMs) produced from 24 h hydrolyzed starch was 6.5-7.0 g/g, whereas those of SMs from 36 and 48 h hydrolyzed starch were higher and comparable (8.0-9.0 g/g). All the SMs were stable against high temperature (>140 °C). Susceptibility of the SMs to α-amylase hydrolysis decreased when the degree of starch hydrolysis increased.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.06.122DOI Listing
October 2020

Effects of Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Biochemical and Physical Quality Changes of White Shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) Treated with Lysine and Sodium Bicarbonate.

J Food Sci 2019 Jul 19;84(7):1784-1790. Epub 2019 Jun 19.

Dept. of Agro-Industrial, Food and Environmental Technology, Faculty of Applied Science, Food and Agro-Industrial Research Center, King Mongkut's Univ. of Technology North Bangkok, 1518, Pracharat Road, Bangsue, Bangkok, 10800, Thailand.

Freezing and thawing occur during storage, transportation, and retail display, leading to deterioration of frozen shrimp. The objective of this research was to investigate the change in quality of frozen white shrimp treated by lysine and NaHCO after multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Shrimp were soaked in lysine and lysine/NaHCO each at 1% (w/v) frozen in an air-blast freezer at -30 °C, and kept in a chest freezer (-18 ± 2 °C) for a week before they were thawed using tap water before the analysis (freeze-thaw cycle 1). The samples were subjected to five freeze-thaw cycles, which were repeated every week. Qualities of the samples were determined for thawing loss, cutting force, and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), as well as oxidation stability by using Rancimat. The use of lysine/NaHCO could significantly reduce thawing loss at all freeze-thaw cycles compared to the control and lysine treatment (P < 0.05). Similar results were found with TVB-N and the oxidation stability of the samples. A difference in cutting forces of the shrimp between lysine and lysine/NaHCO treatment was found when the frequency of freeze-thawing was increased to three cycles; it was lower than that in the control at all cycles. Histological study showed that the treatment with lysine/NaHCO led to the swelling of muscle fibers and fewer fragments at five freeze-thaw cycles. The results showed that lysine/NaHCO could effectively retard the quality loss from repeated freeze-thawing during frozen storage. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Repeated freezing and thawing usually occur during storage, transportation, retail display or in restaurants, and in consumers' kitchens. The temperature at the manufacturing site and during transportation in a tropical country like Thailand is relatively high, and frozen food producers come across quality deterioration resulting from multiple freeze-thaw cycles occurring during transportation and storage. Frozen shrimp producers require research to improve product quality by adding nonphosphate food additives or, if possible, by using natural food ingredients instead of polyphosphate or sodium bicarbonate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.14635DOI Listing
July 2019

Pasting properties of cassava starch modified by heat-moisture treatment under acidic and alkaline pH environments.

Carbohydr Polym 2019 Jul 26;215:338-347. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Department of Agro-Industrial, Food, and Environmental Technology, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok, 1518 Pibulsongkram Road, Bangsue, Bangkok 10800, Thailand.

Effect of pH adjustment before heat-moisture treatment (HMT) on pasting properties of modified cassava starch was investigated. After soaking in acidic water, cassava starch contained smaller molecules, while starch soaked in alkaline water had a more negative charge. These starches with a moisture content of 25% were subsequently heat treated at 100 °C for 16 h. Pasting profile analyses revealed that starch modified by HMT without pH adjustment (HMT_water) had a much higher viscosity than those adjusted pH to 11 and 3 prior to HMT (HMT_pH11 and HMT_pH3). Granules of HMT_water were completely disrupted, whereas the gels of HMT_pH3 and HMT_pH11 still contained particulates that distributed in dispersed starch chains. The appearance of gels varied from sticky with a springy surface for HMT_water to white-turbid, non-sticky and spoonable (yoghurt-like) for HMT_pH3 and brown-turbid, non-sticky, stable and spoonable (pudding-like) for HMT_pH11. These appearances correlated to their gel morphologies and starch structures before HMT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2019.03.089DOI Listing
July 2019

Concentration of plasticizers applied during heat-moisture treatment affects properties of the modified canna starch.

Food Chem 2017 Apr 31;221:1587-1594. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Program of Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, 85 Malaiman Road, Muang, Nakhon Pathom 73000, Thailand.

Effects of the concentration of plasticizers applied during heat-moisture treatment (HMT) on the properties of canna starch were investigated. The modified starches were prepared by soaking starch in 0 (water), 1, 3, 5, 10, 20 and 30% w/w glycerol or sorbitol solution for 24h and adjusting the moisture content to 25% before HMT (100°C, 1h). Changes in the pasting profiles of heat-moisture treated starches were more obvious when glycerol solutions were used instead of water. An increase in the concentration of glycerol solution from 1% to 5% resulted in a progressive decrease in paste viscosity; paste viscosity then increased as the glycerol concentration rose from 10 to 30%. A similar trend was observed when sorbitol was used as a plasticizer, but with a lesser effect. A scheme for arrangements of the molecular structure of starch during the process of HMT was suggested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.10.134DOI Listing
April 2017

Expansion and functional properties of extruded snacks enriched with nutrition sources from food processing by-products.

J Food Sci Technol 2016 Jan 22;53(1):561-70. Epub 2015 Sep 22.

Department of Agro-Industrial, Food and Environmental Technology, Faculty of Applied Science, Food and Agro-Industry Research Center, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand.

Rich sources of protein and dietary fiber from food processing by-products, defatted soybean meal, germinated brown rice meal, and mango peel fiber, were added to corn grit at 20 % (w/w) to produce fortified extruded snacks. Increase of total dietary fiber from 4.82 % (wb) to 5.92-17.80 % (wb) and protein from 5.03 % (wb) to 5.46-13.34 % were observed. The product indicated high expansion and good acceptance tested by sensory panels. There were 22.33-33.53 and 5.30-11.53 fold increase in the phenolics and antioxidant activity in the enriched snack products. The effects of feed moisture content, screw speed, and barrel temperature on expansion and nutritional properties of the extruded products were investigated by using response surface methodology. Regression equations describing the effect of each variable on the product responses were obtained. The snacks extruded with feed moisture 13-15 % (wb) and extrusion temperature at 160-180 °C indicated the products with high preference in terms of expansion ratio between insoluble dietary fiber and soluble dietary fiber balance. The results showed that the by-products could be successfully used for nutritional supplemented expanded snacks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-015-2039-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711464PMC
January 2016

Pasting properties of heat-moisture treated canna starches using different plasticizers during treatment.

Carbohydr Polym 2015 May 13;122:152-9. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Division of Biochemical Technology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi (Bang Khun Thian Campus), 49 Soi Thian Thale 25, Bang Khun Thian Chai Thale Road, Tha Kham, Bang Khun Thian, Bangkok 10150, Thailand. Electronic address:

Different plasticizers (propanol, propylene glycol, glycerol, erythritol, xylitol and sorbitol) were used for plasticizing canna starch during heat-moisture treatment (HMT). Pasting properties of the modified starches were determined and compared with those of native starch and of HMT starch using water as a plasticizer. Canna starch was soaked in 5% (w/w) plasticizer solutions and adjusted to 25% moisture content before heating at 100 °C for 1h. The least change in paste viscosity was found when water was used as a plasticizer. Viscosity of the modified starches decreased as the molecular weight of plasticizers decreased. Plasticizer content in starch granules increased with decreasing molecular weight of the plasticizer, as well as with increased soaking time (from 10 min to 4 and 24h). However, pasting profiles of HMT starches prepared by soaking for 4h were comparable to those soaked for 24h, indicating that there was an effective limit of plasticizers. The plasticizer content in starch granules played a greater role in HMT than the number of hydroxyl groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.12.074DOI Listing
May 2015

Quality assessment of noodles made from blends of rice flour and canna starch.

Food Chem 2015 Jul 31;179:85-93. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok 10240, Thailand.

Canna starch and its derivatives (retrograded, retrograded debranched, and cross-linked) were evaluated for their suitability to be used as prebiotic sources in a rice noodle product. Twenty percent of the rice flour was replaced with these tested starches, and the noodles obtained were analyzed for morphology, cooking qualities, textural properties, and capability of producing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Cross-linked canna starch could increase tensile strength and elongation of rice noodles. Total dietary fiber (TDF) content of noodles made from rice flour was 3.0% and increased to 5.1% and 7.3% when rice flour was replaced with retrograded and retrograded debranched starches, respectively. Cooking qualities and textural properties of noodles containing 20% retrograded debranched starch were mostly comparable, while the capability of producing SCFAs and butyric acid was superior to the control rice noodles; the cooked noodle strips also showed fewer tendencies to stick together.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.01.119DOI Listing
July 2015

Nano-structure of heat-moisture treated waxy and normal starches.

Carbohydr Polym 2013 Aug 24;97(1):1-8. Epub 2013 Apr 24.

Division of Biochemical Technology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, 49 Soi Tientalay 25, Bangkhuntien-Chaitalay Road, Takham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150, Thailand.

Surface regions of untreated and heat-moisture treated (HMT) normal rice, waxy rice, normal corn, waxy corn, normal potato, and waxy potato starch granules were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images revealed surface roughness of untreated starch granules and protrusions with a diameter of approximately 15-90 nm. After treatment, the smooth surface region on starch granules was observed, especially in normal rice, waxy rice, and normal corn starches. A significant reduction in the size of protrusions on the surface of HMT potato starch granules was also detected. The newly formed structures may act as barriers and retard water penetration into starch granules. The blocklet model of starch granule architecture was also confirmed by the AFM images.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2013.04.044DOI Listing
August 2013

Anaerobic digestion of pineapple pulp and peel in a plug-flow reactor.

J Environ Manage 2012 Nov 15;110:40-7. Epub 2012 Jun 15.

Department of Agro-Industrial Technology, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok, 1518 Pibulsongkram Rd., BKK 10800, Bangsue Bangkok, Thailand.

The objective of this research was to study the production of biogas by using pineapple pulp and peel, the by-products from fruit processing plants, in a plug-flow reactor (17.5 L total volume). The effects of feed concentration, total solids (TS) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on degradation of the waste were investigated. The increase of pineapple pulp and peel of 2% (wt/vol) at HRT 7 d to 4% (wt/vol) at HRT 10 d showed increases in biogas production rate, biogas yield and methane yield - from 0.12 v/v-d, 0.26 m(3)/kg COD removed and 0.11 m(3)/kg COD removed, with COD removal at 64.1%, to 0.25 v/v-d, 0.43 m(3)/kg COD removed and 0.14 m(3)/kg COD removed, with COD removal at 60.41%. The methanogenic fermentation was more active in the middle and final parts of the reactor. The recirculation of fermentation effluent at 40% (vol/vol) of the working volume into the reactor could increase the biogas production rate and biogas yield up to 52% and 12%, respectively. The results showed technological potential for waste treatment of pineapple pulp and peel in a plug-flow reactor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2012.05.017DOI Listing
November 2012