Publications by authors named "Chuanqiang Xu"

3 Publications

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QTLs and candidate genes analyses for fruit size under domestication and differentiation in melon (Cucumis melo L.) based on high resolution maps.

BMC Plant Biol 2021 Mar 3;21(1):126. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Horticultural Crops of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100081, Beijing, China.

Background: Melon is a very important horticultural crop produced worldwide with high phenotypic diversity. Fruit size is among the most important domestication and differentiation traits in melon. The molecular mechanisms of fruit size in melon are largely unknown.

Results: Two high-density genetic maps were constructed by whole-genome resequencing with two F segregating populations (WAP and MAP) derived from two crosses (cultivated agrestis × wild agrestis and cultivated melo × cultivated agrestis). We obtained 1,871,671 and 1,976,589 high quality SNPs that show differences between parents in WAP and MAP. A total of 5138 and 5839 recombination events generated 954 bins in WAP and 1027 bins in MAP with the average size of 321.3 Kb and 301.4 Kb respectively. All bins were mapped onto 12 linkage groups in WAP and MAP. The total lengths of two linkage maps were 904.4 cM (WAP) and 874.5 cM (MAP), covering 86.6% and 87.4% of the melon genome. Two loci for fruit size were identified on chromosome 11 in WAP and chromosome 5 in MAP, respectively. An auxin response factor and a YABBY transcription factor were inferred to be the candidate genes for both loci.

Conclusion: The high-resolution genetic maps and QTLs analyses for fruit size described here will provide a better understanding the genetic basis of domestication and differentiation, and provide a valuable tool for map-based cloning and molecular marker assisted breeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-021-02904-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7931605PMC
March 2021

Effects of Elevated Root-Zone CO on Root Morphology and Nitrogen Metabolism Revealed by Physiological and Transcriptome Analysis in Oriental Melon Seedling Roots.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Jan 25;21(3). Epub 2020 Jan 25.

College of Horticulture, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866, China.

Rhizosphere CO is vital for crop growth, development, and productivity. However, the mechanisms of plants' responses to root-zone CO are unclear. Oriental melons are sensitive to root-zone gas, often encountering high root-zone CO during cultivation. We investigated root growth and nitrogen metabolism in oriental melons under T1 (0.5%) and T2 (1.0%) root-zone CO concentrations using physiology and comparative transcriptome analysis. T1 and T2 increased root vigor and the nitrogen content in the short term. With increased treatment time and CO concentration, root inhibition increased, characterized by decreased root absorption, incomplete root cell structure, accelerated starch accumulation and hydrolysis, and cell aging. We identified 1280 and 1042 differentially expressed genes from T1 and T2, respectively, compared with 0.037% CO-grown plants. Among them, 683 co-expressed genes are involved in stress resistance and nitrogen metabolism (enhanced phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, hormone signal transduction, glutathione metabolism, and starch and sucrose metabolism). Nitrogen metabolism gene expression, enzyme activity, and nitrogen content analyses showed that short-term elevated root-zone CO mainly regulated plant nitrogen metabolism post-transcriptionally, and directly inhibited it transcriptionally in the long term. These findings provided a basis for further investigation of nitrogen regulation by candidate genes in oriental melons under elevated root-zone CO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21030803DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7037942PMC
January 2020

Molecular cloning and expression of an encoding galactinol synthase gene (AnGolS1) in seedling of Ammopiptanthus nanus.

Sci Rep 2016 10 27;6:36113. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Horticulture Department, Shenyang Agricultural University, No. 120 Dongling Road, Shenhe District 110866, P.R. China.

Based on the galactinol synthase (AnGolS1) fragment sequence from a cold-induced Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) library derived from Ammopiptanthus nanus (A. nanus) seedlings, AnGolS1 mRNA (including the 5' UTR and 3' UTR) (GenBank accession number: GU942748) was isolated and characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). A substrate reaction test revealed that AnGolS1 possessed galactinol synthase activity in vitro and could potentially be an early-responsive gene. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated that AnGolS1 was responded to cold, salts and drought stresses, however, significantly up-regulated in all origans by low temperatures, especially in plant stems. In addition, the hybridization signals in the fascicular cambium were strongest in all cells under low temperature. Thus, we propose that AnGolS1 plays critical roles in A. nanus low-temperature stress resistance and that fascicular cambium cells could be involved in AnGolS1 mRNA transcription, galactinol transportation and coordination under low-temperature stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep36113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5081558PMC
October 2016