Publications by authors named "Chrysovalantou Nikolaidou"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with muscular dystrophies: strengthening the data.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2020 Jun 10. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

1st Department of Cardiology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487320932693DOI Listing
June 2020

Bolus Intravenous Procainamide in Patients with Frequent Ventricular Ectopics during Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scanning: A Way to Ensure High Quality Imaging.

Diagnostics (Basel) 2021 Jan 27;11(2). Epub 2021 Jan 27.

First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA Hospital, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 546 36 Thessaloniki, Greece.

Acquiring high-quality cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images in patients with frequent ventricular arrhythmias remains a challenge. We examined the safety and efficacy of procainamide when administered on the scanner table prior to CMR scanning to suppress ventricular ectopy and acquire high-quality images. Fifty consecutive patients (age 53.0 [42.0-58.0]; 52% female, left ventricular ejection fraction 55 ± 9%) were scanned in a 1.5 T scanner using a standard cardiac protocol. Procainamide was administered at intermittent intravenous bolus doses of 50 mg every minute until suppression of the ectopics or a maximum dose of 10 mg/kg. The average dose of procainamide was 567 ± 197 mg. Procainamide successfully suppressed premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) in 82% of patients, resulting in high-quality images. The baseline blood pressure (BP) was mildly reduced (mean change systolic BP -12 ± 9 mmHg; diastolic BP -4 ± 9 mmHg), while the baseline heart rate (HR) remained relatively unchanged (mean HR change -1 ± 6 bpm). None of the patients developed proarrhythmic changes. Bolus intravenous administration of procainamide prior to CMR scanning is a safe and effective alternative approach for suppressing PVCs and acquiring high-quality images in patients with frequent PVCs and normal or only mildly reduced systolic function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7911068PMC
January 2021

Rare congenital quadricuspid pulmonary valve stenosis evaluated by CMR.

Oxf Med Case Reports 2020 Dec 28;2020(12):omaa112. Epub 2020 Dec 28.

Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/omcr/omaa112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7768525PMC
December 2020

Should everyone have an MRI in heart failure?

Cardiovasc Diagn Ther 2020 Jun;10(3):549-553

First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/cdt.2019.12.06DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7369283PMC
June 2020

Cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with muscular dystrophies: strengthening the data.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2020 Jun 9:2047487320932693. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

1st Department of Cardiology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487320932693DOI Listing
June 2020

Uncovering the skeleton in the heart: an unusual case of mitral annular calcification extending to the left ventricular myocardium.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2020 10;21(11):1301

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jeaa121DOI Listing
October 2020

Rare unicuspid pulmonary valve and pulmonary artery aneurysm in an elderly asymptomatic patient.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2020 06;21(6):708

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research (OCMR), University of Oxford, Level 0 John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jeaa008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7237956PMC
June 2020

The shape of our hearts: The impact of early stages in life on cardiac development.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2020 01 13;27(1):60-62. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

1st Department of Cardiology, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487319869579DOI Listing
January 2020

Coronary artery aneurysms-a truly rare entity or simply unrecognized so far?

Oxf Med Case Reports 2019 Mar 29;2019(3):omz009. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Oxford Centre for Magnetic Resonance, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/omcr/omz009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440257PMC
March 2019

Iatrogenic Lutembacher Syndrome after Percutaneous Mitral Commissurotomy.

J Heart Valve Dis 2017 05;26(3):368-371

First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are common immediately after percutaneous mitral commissurotomy (PMC). They are usually small, hemodynamically insignificant, and tend to decrease or disappear within 6 to 12 months. Herein, a case is described of persistent ASD in a patient with mitral valve stenosis who had undergone successful PMC three years previously. The patient had signs and symptoms of right heart failure and severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) with borderline right ventricular systolic function on echocardiography, in addition to the ASD. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging played a significant role in decision-making by clarifying the anatomy of the ASD and severity of the shunt, measuring right ventricular systolic function, and providing absolute quantification for TR. The right ventricular systolic function was normal on CMR, rendering the patient suitable for surgical treatment. Persistent iatrogenic ASDs have become an increasingly common finding after invasive procedures requiring trans-septal puncture and the manipulation of catheters. Multimodality imaging can provide significant aid in the management of patients with valvular heart disease complicated by iatrogenic shunts.
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May 2017

Double-chambered left ventricle characterized by CMR.

Hellenic J Cardiol 2017 Nov - Dec;58(6):459-460. Epub 2017 Jun 6.

First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hjc.2017.05.007DOI Listing
November 2018

The role of catheter ablation in the management of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators presenting with electrical storm.

Hellenic J Cardiol 2017 Jan - Feb;58(1):51-56. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

First Cardiology Department, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Objective: Electrical storm (ES) is not uncommon among patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in situ. Catheter ablation (CA) may suppress the arrhythmia in the acute setting and prevent ES recurrence.

Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with an ICD in situ presenting with ES underwent electrophysiologic studies followed by CA. CA outcome was classified as a complete success if both clinical and non-clinical tachycardia were successfully ablated, partial success if ≥1 non-clinical tachycardia episodes were still inducible post-CA, and failure if clinical tachycardia could not be abolished. Patients were followed for a median period (IQR) of 5.6 (1.8-13.7) months. The primary endpoint was event-free survival from ES recurrence. The secondary endpoint was event-free survival from a composite of ES and/or sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) recurrence.

Results: Clinical arrhythmia was successfully ablated in 14 out of 19 (73.7%) cases after a single CA procedure. A completely successful CA outcome was associated with significantly increased ES-free survival compared with a partially successful or failed procedure (Log rank P=0.039). Nevertheless, patients with acute suppression of all tachycardia episodes (n=11), relative to those with a partially successful or a failed CA procedure (n=8), did not differ in incidence of the composite endpoint of sustained VT or ES (Log rank P=0.278).

Conclusion: A single CA procedure can acutely suppress clinical arrhythmia in three-quarters of cases. A completely successful CA outcome can prolong ES-free survival; however, sporadic ICD therapies cannot be abrogated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hjc.2017.01.019DOI Listing
March 2018

Avulsion of an aortic cusp during aortic balloon valvuloplasty.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2015 Feb 14;8(2):e15-e16. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Department of Cardiology, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2014.09.018DOI Listing
February 2015