Mr.  Christopher Odero, MCHD - PATH  - Technical Advisor (Policy, Access and Introduction)

Mr. Christopher Odero

MCHD

PATH

Technical Advisor (Policy, Access and Introduction)

Nairobi | Kenya

Main Specialties: Epidemiology, Infectious Disease, Public Health

Additional Specialties: Epidemiology, Public/ Community Health, Health Impact

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2317-9405


Top Author

Mr.  Christopher Odero, MCHD - PATH  - Technical Advisor (Policy, Access and Introduction)

Mr. Christopher Odero

MCHD

Introduction

I have over 10 years’ research experience, having worked with the KEMRICDC Research and Public Health Collaboration in Western Kenya and contributing to the conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of numerous malaria research projects and interventions. I have led a number of malaria prevention studies ranging from community prevalence studies, drug efficacy studies and clinical trials on malaria vaccines.
I’m currently a Technical Advisor at PATH’s Center for Vaccine Innovation and Access (CVIA). I support Ministries of Health (MoH) through the Malaria (National Malaria Control Program - NMCP) and Immunization (Expanded Program on Immunization - EPI) programs on planning for introduction, implementation and evaluation of vaccines and malaria interventions. These range from support for writing vaccine introduction plans, EPI program reviews, joint planning processes, cMYP reviews, cold chain capacity assessments among others for the EPI programs and Global Fund Country applications, NMCP program assessment and reviews, planning, conducting, analysis and presentation of Malaria Indicator Surveys amongst others for NMCP.
My experience covers multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams and I possess strong interpersonal skills. My main aspiration is to continue to contribute to the body of knowledge while advancing knowledge on public health interventions particularly on disadvantaged communities. I aspire to contribute to the efforts aimed at making available efficacious and cost effective interventions to people who need them most and ensuring their most optimal use and application.

Primary Affiliation: PATH - Nairobi , Kenya

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Mr. Christopher Odero’s Resume / CV

Metrics

Number of Publications

13

Publications

Number of Profile Views

489

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

200

Reads

Number of Citations

898

Citations

Education

Nov 2012 - Jun 2016
Great Lakes University of Kisumu
Master of Community Health and Development
Jan 2009 - Jan 2011
University of Liverpool
Post Graduate Diploma in Public Health
Jan 1999 - Jan 2002
Kenya Medical Training College
Diploma in Clinical Medicine and Surgery

Experience

Jan 2013 - Jan 2014
IntraHealth International Inc
Country Director for the Measurement, Learning and Evaluation (MLE) project
Jan 2004 - Jan 2013
KEMRI/CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration
Co-Investigator and Site Study Coordinator (SSC)
Jan 2014
PATH
Technical Advisor - Policy, Access and Introduction (Malaria interventions and Vaccines)

Publications

13Publications

200Reads

898PubMed Central Citations

Assessment of submicroscopic infections and gametocyte carriage of Plasmodium falciparum during peak malaria transmission season in a community-based cross-sectional survey in western Kenya, 2012.

Malar J 2016 08 19;15(1):421. Epub 2016 Aug 19.

Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

View Article
August 2016
13 Reads
7 Citations
3.110 Impact Factor

Assessment of submicroscopic infections and gametocyte carriage of Plasmodium falciparum during peak malaria transmission season in a community-based cross-sectional survey in western Kenya, 2012

Malaria Journal

Background Although malaria control intervention has greatly decreased malaria morbidity and mortality in many African countries, further decline in parasite prevalence has stagnated in western Kenya. In order to assess if malaria transmission reservoir is associated with this stagnation, submicroscopic infection and gametocyte carriage was estimated. Risk factors and associations between malaria control interventions and gametocyte carriage were further investigated in this study. Methods A total of 996 dried blood spot samples were used from two strata, all smear-positives (516 samples) and randomly selected smear-negatives (480 samples), from a community cross-sectional survey conducted at peak transmission season in 2012 in Siaya County, western Kenya. Plasmodium falciparum parasite presence and density were determined by stained blood smear and by 18S mRNA transcripts using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay (NASBA), gametocyte presence and density were determined by blood smear and by Pfs25 mRNA-NASBA, and gametocyte diversity by Pfg377 mRNA RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Results Of the randomly selected smear-negative samples, 69.6 % (334/480) were positive by 18S-NASBA while 18S-NASBA detected 99.6 % (514/516) smear positive samples. Overall, 80.2 % of the weighted population was parasite positive by 18S-NASBA vs 30.6 % by smear diagnosis and 44.0 % of the weighted population was gametocyte positive by Pfs25-NASBA vs 2.6 % by smear diagnosis. Children 5–15 years old were more likely to be parasitaemic and gametocytaemic by NASBA than individuals >15 years old or children <5 years old while gametocyte density decreased with age. Anaemia and self-reported fever within the past 24 h were associated with increased odds of gametocytaemia. Fever was also positively associated with parasite density, but not with gametocyte density. Anti-malarial use within the past 2 weeks decreased the odds of gametocytaemia, but not the odds of parasitaemia. In contrast, recent anti-malarial use was associated with lowered parasite density, but not the gametocyte density. Use of ITNs was associated with lower odds for parasitaemia in part of the study area with a longer history of ITN interventions. In the same part of study area, the odds of having multiple gametocyte alleles were also lower in individuals using ITNs than in those not using ITNs and parasite density was positively associated with gametocyte diversity. Conclusion A large proportion of submicroscopic parasites and gametocytes in western Kenya might contribute to the stagnation in malaria prevalence, suggesting that additional interventions targeting the infectious reservoir are needed. As school aged children and persons with anaemia and fever were major sources for gametocyte reservoir, these groups should be targeted for intervention and prevention to reduce malaria transmission. Anti-malarial use was associated with lower parasite density and odds of gametocytaemia, but not the gametocyte density, indicating a limitation of anti-malarial impact on the transmission reservoir. ITN use had a protective role against parasitaemia and gametocyte diversity in western Kenya.

View Article
August 2016
2 Reads

Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum parasite by microsatellite markers after scale-up of insecticide-treated bed nets in western Kenya.

Malar J 2015 Dec 9;13 Suppl 1:495. Epub 2015 Dec 9.

Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

View Article
December 2015
22 Reads
6 Citations
3.110 Impact Factor

Assessment of molecular markers for anti-malarial drug resistance after the introduction and scale-up of malaria control interventions in western Kenya.

Malar J 2015 Feb 14;14:75. Epub 2015 Feb 14.

Malaria Branch and Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

View Article
February 2015
11 Reads
8 Citations
3.110 Impact Factor

A randomized trial of artemether-lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria among children in western Kenya.

Malar J 2013 Jul 19;12:254. Epub 2013 Jul 19.

Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

View Article
July 2013
11 Reads
12 Citations
3.110 Impact Factor

A phase 3 trial of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine in African infants.

Authors:
Selidji Todagbe Agnandji Bertrand Lell José Francisco Fernandes Béatrice Peggy Abossolo Barbara Gaelle Nfono Ondo Methogo Anita Lumeka Kabwende Ayola Akim Adegnika Benjamin Mordmüller Saadou Issifou Peter Gottfried Kremsner Jahit Sacarlal Pedro Aide Miguel Lanaspa John J Aponte Sonia Machevo Sozinho Acacio Helder Bulo Betuel Sigauque Eusébio Macete Pedro Alonso Salim Abdulla Nahya Salim Rose Minja Maxmillian Mpina Saumu Ahmed Ali Mohammed Ali Ali Takadir Mtoro Ali Said Hamad Paul Mutani Marcel Tanner Halidou Tinto Umberto D'Alessandro Hermann Sorgho Innocent Valea Biébo Bihoun Issa Guiraud Berenger Kaboré Olivier Sombié Robert Tinga Guiguemdé Jean Bosco Ouédraogo Mary J Hamel Simon Kariuki Martina Oneko Chris Odero Kephas Otieno Norbert Awino Meredith McMorrow Vincent Muturi-Kioi Kayla F Laserson Laurence Slutsker Walter Otieno Lucas Otieno Nekoye Otsyula Stacey Gondi Allan Otieno Victorine Owira Esther Oguk George Odongo Jon Ben Woods Bernhards Ogutu Patricia Njuguna Roma Chilengi Pauline Akoo Christine Kerubo Charity Maingi Trudie Lang Ally Olotu Philip Bejon Kevin Marsh Gabriel Mwambingu Seth Owusu-Agyei Kwaku Poku Asante Kingsley Osei-Kwakye Owusu Boahen David Dosoo Isaac Asante George Adjei Evans Kwara Daniel Chandramohan Brian Greenwood John Lusingu Samwel Gesase Anangisye Malabeja Omari Abdul Coline Mahende Edwin Liheluka Lincoln Malle Martha Lemnge Thor G Theander Chris Drakeley Daniel Ansong Tsiri Agbenyega Samuel Adjei Harry Owusu Boateng Theresa Rettig John Bawa Justice Sylverken David Sambian Anima Sarfo Alex Agyekum Francis Martinson Irving Hoffman Tisungane Mvalo Portia Kamthunzi Rutendo Nkomo Tapiwa Tembo Gerald Tegha Mercy Tsidya Jane Kilembe Chimwemwe Chawinga W Ripley Ballou Joe Cohen Yolanda Guerra Erik Jongert Didier Lapierre Amanda Leach Marc Lievens Opokua Ofori-Anyinam Aurélie Olivier Johan Vekemans Terrell Carter David Kaslow Didier Leboulleux Christian Loucq Afiya Radford Barbara Savarese David Schellenberg Marla Sillman Preeti Vansadia

N Engl J Med 2012 Dec 9;367(24):2284-95. Epub 2012 Nov 9.

Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon.

View Article
December 2012
33 Reads
239 Citations
55.870 Impact Factor

First results of phase 3 trial of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine in African children.

Authors:
Selidji Todagbe Agnandji Bertrand Lell Solange Solmeheim Soulanoudjingar José Francisco Fernandes Béatrice Peggy Abossolo Cornelia Conzelmann Barbara Gaelle Nfono Ondo Methogo Yannick Doucka Arnaud Flamen Benjamin Mordmüller Saadou Issifou Peter Gottfried Kremsner Jahit Sacarlal Pedro Aide Miguel Lanaspa John J Aponte Arlindo Nhamuave Diana Quelhas Quique Bassat Sofia Mandjate Eusébio Macete Pedro Alonso Salim Abdulla Nahya Salim Omar Juma Mwanajaa Shomari Kafuruki Shubis Francisca Machera Ali Said Hamad Rose Minja Ali Mtoro Alma Sykes Saumu Ahmed Alwisa Martin Urassa Ali Mohammed Ali Grace Mwangoka Marcel Tanner Halidou Tinto Umberto D'Alessandro Hermann Sorgho Innocent Valea Marc Christian Tahita William Kaboré Sayouba Ouédraogo Yara Sandrine Robert Tinga Guiguemdé Jean Bosco Ouédraogo Mary J Hamel Simon Kariuki Chris Odero Martina Oneko Kephas Otieno Norbert Awino Jackton Omoto John Williamson Vincent Muturi-Kioi Kayla F Laserson Laurence Slutsker Walter Otieno Lucas Otieno Otsyula Nekoye Stacey Gondi Allan Otieno Bernhards Ogutu Ruth Wasuna Victorine Owira David Jones Agnes Akoth Onyango Patricia Njuguna Roma Chilengi Pauline Akoo Christine Kerubo Jesse Gitaka Charity Maingi Trudie Lang Ally Olotu Benjamin Tsofa Philip Bejon Norbert Peshu Kevin Marsh Seth Owusu-Agyei Kwaku Poku Asante Kingsley Osei-Kwakye Owusu Boahen Samuel Ayamba Kingsley Kayan Ruth Owusu-Ofori David Dosoo Isaac Asante George Adjei George Adjei Daniel Chandramohan Brian Greenwood John Lusingu Samwel Gesase Anangisye Malabeja Omari Abdul Hassan Kilavo Coline Mahende Edwin Liheluka Martha Lemnge Thor Theander Chris Drakeley Daniel Ansong Tsiri Agbenyega Samuel Adjei Harry Owusu Boateng Theresa Rettig John Bawa Justice Sylverken David Sambian Alex Agyekum Larko Owusu Francis Martinson Irving Hoffman Tisungane Mvalo Portia Kamthunzi Ruthendo Nkomo Albans Msika Allan Jumbe Nelecy Chome Dalitso Nyakuipa Joseph Chintedza W Ripley Ballou Myriam Bruls Joe Cohen Yolanda Guerra Erik Jongert Didier Lapierre Amanda Leach Marc Lievens Opokua Ofori-Anyinam Johan Vekemans Terrell Carter Didier Leboulleux Christian Loucq Afiya Radford Barbara Savarese David Schellenberg Marla Sillman Preeti Vansadia

N Engl J Med 2011 11 18;365(20):1863-75. Epub 2011 Oct 18.

Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambarene, Gabon.

View Article
November 2011
48 Reads
284 Citations
55.870 Impact Factor

In-vivo efficacy of amodiaquine-artesunate in children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in western Kenya.

Trop Med Int Health 2009 Mar 28;14(3):294-300. Epub 2009 Jan 28.

Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

View Article
March 2009
1 Read
14 Citations
2.330 Impact Factor