Publications by authors named "Christopher M Domenico"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Treatment of corticosteroid refractory immune checkpoint inhibitor myocarditis with Infliximab: a case series.

Cardiooncology 2021 Mar 30;7(1):13. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, Philadelphia, USA.

Background: Glucocorticoid treatment remains the cornerstone of therapy for immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) myocarditis, but data supporting the use of additional immunotherapy for steroid refractory cases remains limited. We investigate the safety and efficacy of infliximab in patients with ICI myocarditis who are refractory to corticosteroids. Additionally, we highlight the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach in the care for these complex patients.

Methods: We retrospectively identified consecutive patients who developed ICI myocarditis at our institution between January 2017 and January 2020. Baseline characteristics, laboratory data and clinical outcomes were compared between patients who received infliximab and those who did not.

Results: Of a total of 11 patients who developed ICI myocarditis, 4 were treated with infliximab. Aside from age, there were no significant differences in baseline patient characteristics between the two groups including total number of ICI doses received and duration from initial ICI dose to onset of symptoms. The time to troponin normalization was 58 vs. 151.5 days (p = 0.25). The duration of prednisone taper was longer in the infliximab group (90 vs. 150 days p = 0.32). All patients survived initial hospital admission. Over a median follow-up period of 287 days, two of the 4 patients died from sepsis 2 and 3 months after initial treatment of their myocarditis; one of these patients was on a steroid taper and the other patient had just completed a steroid taper.

Conclusions: Infliximab, despite its black box warning in patients with heart failure, may be a safe and effective treatment for ICI myocarditis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40959-021-00095-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008661PMC
March 2021

Ventricular Assist Device Driveline Infection and Development of Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Case Series.

ASAIO J 2021 Mar 17. Epub 2021 Mar 17.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City, New York Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Cardiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Cardiothoracic Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Durable left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are frequently complicated by driveline infection. The objective of this case series was to examine whether an association exists between driveline infection and intracranial hemorrhage. This retrospective case series included patients at a single tertiary care hospital on durable LVAD support who developed intracranial hemorrhage. Physical examination data, vital signs, and laboratory markers of sepsis including blood cultures and imaging of driveline sites were reviewed. A total of nine patients were included in the case series. At the time of hemorrhagic event, five patients had active driveline infection, and five patients were found to be bacteremic. All bacteremic patients were found to have supratherapeutic INR at the time of presentation. Although five patients experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage, only one patient was found to have a cerebral aneurysm. This case series highlights a possible association between LVAD driveline infection and intracranial hemorrhage, and the need for further research to better understand the pathophysiology driving this association.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000001409DOI Listing
March 2021

COVID-19 and cardiac arrhythmias.

Heart Rhythm 2020 Sep 22;17(9):1439-1444. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address:

Background: Early studies suggest that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a high incidence of cardiac arrhythmias. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection may cause injury to cardiac myocytes and increase arrhythmia risk.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of cardiac arrest and arrhythmias including incident atrial fibrillation (AF), bradyarrhythmias, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) in a large urban population hospitalized for COVID-19. We also evaluated correlations between the presence of these arrhythmias and mortality.

Methods: We reviewed the characteristics of all patients with COVID-19 admitted to our center over a 9-week period. Throughout hospitalization, we evaluated the incidence of cardiac arrests, arrhythmias, and inpatient mortality. We also used logistic regression to evaluate age, sex, race, body mass index, prevalent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and intensive care unit (ICU) status as potential risk factors for each arrhythmia.

Results: Among 700 patients (mean age 50 ± 18 years; 45% men; 71% African American; 11% received ICU care), there were 9 cardiac arrests, 25 incident AF events, 9 clinically significant bradyarrhythmias, and 10 NSVTs. All cardiac arrests occurred in patients admitted to the ICU. In addition, admission to the ICU was associated with incident AF (odds ratio [OR] 4.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-13.18) and NSVT (OR 8.92; 95% CI 1.73-46.06) after multivariable adjustment. Also, age and incident AF (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.02-1.09) and prevalent heart failure and bradyarrhythmias (OR 9.75; 95% CI 1.95-48.65) were independently associated. Only cardiac arrests were associated with acute in-hospital mortality.

Conclusion: Cardiac arrests and arrhythmias are likely the consequence of systemic illness and not solely the direct effects of COVID-19 infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2020.06.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7307518PMC
September 2020
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