Publications by authors named "Christophe Bienaimé"

5 Publications

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Development of antibodies against secoisolariciresinol--application to the immunolocalization of lignans in Linum usitatissimum seeds.

Phytochemistry 2010 Dec 1;71(17-18):1979-87. Epub 2010 Oct 1.

Université de Picardie Jules Verne, EA3900-BioPI Biologie des Plantes et contrôle des Insectes ravageurs, Faculté de Pharmacie, 1 rue des Louvels, 80037 Amiens cedex, France.

Lignans are widely distributed plant metabolites associated with a large range of biological activities. In order to gain insight into their biosynthesis and their spatio-temporal accumulation an immunological probe was developed. Secondary metabolites generally have too small molecular weight to be antigenic and have to be associated with a carrier protein. Secoisolariciresinol was chosen as the hapten and was linked to bovine serum albumin via a spacer arm, the p-aminohippuric acid. The artificial antigen was injected to New Zealand rabbits. The successful production of polyclonal antibodies against secoisolariciresinol was assessed with indirect enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by comparison with pre-immune serum and by competitive assays using dilutions of secoisolariciresinol standards. The antibodies had an IC(50) value of 94 μg/ml and showed moderate cross-reactivities with structurally related compounds. They were thus used to immunolocalize lignans in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum), one of the richest sources of lignans. The immunohistochemical labeling allowed us to localize for the first time lignans in planta. They are mainly localized in the secondary wall of the sclerite cells of the outer integument of the seed. A very light labeling is also observed in cytoplasmic inclusions of the endosperm. The results were correlated with HPLC analytical results which enabled to evaluate the relative lignan quantities: in flaxseed about 90% of the metabolites are localized in the outer integument.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2010.09.002DOI Listing
December 2010

Extraction of lignans from flaxseed and evaluation of their biological effects on breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines.

J Med Food 2010 Aug;13(4):834-41

Biology of Plantes and Insects, EA 3900, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France.

Over the last decade, there has been an increasing interest in using flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) in diet in order to improve nutritional and health status. Lignans are major components of flaxseed. Therefore an extraction procedure for lignans from flaxseed has been optimized. The influence of some parameters was investigated: first the preliminary extraction step with alcoholic solvent, and then the solvent polarity and pH of the extract. All these conditions affected the total lignan content, but the most critical variables were preliminary extraction and solvent polarity. The optimized procedure, consisting of a direct hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid (1 M) at 100 degrees C for 1 hour followed by an extraction with a mixture of ethyl acetate/hexane (90:10 vol/vol), was applied to 340 g of defatted flaxseed and resulted in the isolation of secoisolariciresinol and anhydrosecoisolariciresinol with a purity of 97% and 98%, respectively, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The ability of these two compounds and that of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside to modulate the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines was assessed. Our results show that lignans modulate development of breast cancer cells. The most intense effect was observed for anhydrosecoisolariciresinol, which significantly decreased cell growth at 50 and 100 microM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2009.0172DOI Listing
August 2010

Polymer biodegradation: mechanisms and estimation techniques.

Chemosphere 2008 Sep 23;73(4):429-42. Epub 2008 Aug 23.

Laboratoire des Technologies Innovantes (EA 3899), Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Avenue des Facultés, 80025 Amiens Cedex 1, France.

Within the frame of the sustainable development, new materials are being conceived in order to increase their biodegradability properties. Biodegradation is considered to take place throughout three stages: biodeterioration, biofragmentation and assimilation, without neglect the participation of abiotic factors. However, most of the techniques used by researchers in this area are inadequate to provide evidence of the final stage: assimilation. In this review, we describe the different stages of biodegradation and we state several techniques used by some authors working in this domain. Validate assimilation (including mineralisation) is an important aspect to guarantee the real biodegradability of items of consumption (in particular friendly environmental new materials). The aim of this review is to emphasise the importance of measure as well as possible, the last stage of the biodegradation, in order to certify the integration of new materials into the biogeochemical cycles. Finally, we give a perspective to use the natural labelling of stable isotopes in the environment, by means of a new methodology based on the isotopic fractionation to validate assimilation by microorganisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.06.064DOI Listing
September 2008

Altered nitrogen metabolism associated with de-differentiated suspension cultures derived from root cultures of Datura stramonium studied by heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy.

J Exp Bot 2004 May 8;55(399):1053-60. Epub 2004 Apr 8.

Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie, EA 2085, Faculté de Pharmacie, 1, rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens cedex 1, France.

De-differentiation of transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium has previously been shown to cause a loss of tropane alkaloid synthetic capacity. This indicates a marked shift in physiological status, notably in the flux of primary metabolites into tropane alkaloids. Nitrogen metabolism in transformed root cultures of D. stramonium (an alkaloid-producing system) and de-differentiated suspension cultures derived therefrom (a non-producing system) has been compared using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (15)N-Labelled precursors [((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) and K(15)NO(3)] were fed and their incorporation into nitrogenous metabolites studied using Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. In both cultures, the same amino acids were resolved in the HMBC spectra. However, marked differences were found in the intensity of labelling of a range of nitrogenous compounds. In differentiated root cultures, cross-peaks corresponding to secondary metabolites, such as tropine, were observed, whereas these were absent in the de-differentiated cultures. By contrast, N- acetylputrescine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulated in the de-differentiated cultures to a much larger extent than in the root cultures. It can therefore be suggested that the loss of alkaloid biosynthesis was compensated by the diversion of putrescine metabolism away from the tropane pathway and toward the synthesis of GABA via N-acetylputrescine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erh119DOI Listing
May 2004

How to build an adapted and bioactive cell microenvironment? A chemical interaction study of the structure of Ca-alginate matrices and their repercussion on confined cells.

J Biomed Mater Res A 2003 Nov;67(2):376-88

Laboratoire de Génie Cellulaire, (UMR CNRS 6022), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80 039 Amiens Cedex, France.

Alginates are increasingly being used as medical materials (matrices for tissue regeneration, surgical sponges, hemostatic bandages, microbial and cell encapsulation, artificial bacterial biofilms, etc.). The constitution of alginate gel networks is a complex phenomenon. A great number of different kinds of polysaccharidic frameworks can come to existence depending on the conditions used for their attainment. For instance, the degree of heterogeneity and porosity of Ca-alginate beads rely on this molecular organization. The formation of structural irregularities (superficial crust, cavities, shafts, dense or light gel frameworks, ordered or chaotic domains, etc.) within the alginate gel beads are inherent to this skeletal design. Several specific staining molecules (e.g. calcon carboxylic acid, murexide, methylene blue) that are negatively or positively charged interact with the gel network. These molecules allowed us to reveal a great variety of chemical interactions shown by the pattern coloration of the internal structure of the gel. The results observed are very different for the several matrices analyzed, which could explain to a great extent the singular behavior that cells confined in these kind of matrices exhibit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.10487DOI Listing
November 2003