Publications by authors named "Christoph Seeh"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genotyping of German and Austrian Taylorella equigenitalis isolates using repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE).

Res Vet Sci 2016 Dec 4;109:101-106. Epub 2016 Oct 4.

Institut für Mikrobiologie, Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien (Institute of Microbiology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna), Veterinärplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

A total of 124 Taylorella (T.) equigenitalis and five T. asinigenitalis field isolates collected between 2002 and 2014 were available for genotyping using REP- (repetitive extragenic palindromic) PCR and PFGE (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis). The study comprised 79 T. equigenitalis field isolates originating from ten defined breeds of German horses and revealed a spectrum of five REP (rep-E1-E4, rep-E3a) and 15 PFGE (TE-A1-A9, TE-B1-B3, TE-C, TE-E1, and TE-E2) genotypes. T. equigenitalis field isolates (n=40) obtained from Austrian Lipizzaner horses were differentiated into three REP (rep-E1, rep-E3a, and rep-E4) and three PFGE genotypes (TE-A2, TE-A5, and TE-D); those isolated from four Austrian Trotters belonged to the REP/PFGE genotype rep-E2/TE-A1. Interestingly, a T. equigenitalis isolate recovered from a Holsteiner stallion living in South Africa revealed the REP/PFGE genotype rep-E1/TE-A5 which was otherwise exclusively present in the majority of Austrian Lipizzaner horses in our study. The type strain included in this study revealed the genotype REP/PFGE rep-E1/TE-F. Six strains of T. asinigenitalis including the type strain were separated into three REP (rep-A1-A3) and six PFGE genotypes (TA-A1, TA-A2, TA-A3, TA-B, TA-C, TA-D). Overall, the generated REP and PFGE genotypes showed a good correlation, whereas REP-PCR proved to be a suitable method for molecular epidemiological screening of T. equigenitalis and T. asinigenitalis isolates that should be differentiated in detail by genotyping using PFGE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2016.09.017DOI Listing
December 2016

Prevention of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy - Is heparin a novel option? A case report.

Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere 2016 Oct 21;44(5):313-317. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

Dr. Jasmin Walter, Klinik für Reproduktionsmedizin, Vetsuisse-Fakultät der Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zürich, Schweiz, E-Mail:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) is a severe manifestation of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) infection. Prevention and treatment of EHM during EHV-1 outbreaks is critical, but no reliable and tested specific medication is available. Due to the thromboischemic nature of EHM and due to the fact that EHV-1 entry in cells is blocked by heparin, it was hypothesized that this compound may be useful in reduction of EHM incidence and severity. Therefore, during an acute EHV-1 outbreak with the neuropathogenic G/D Pol variant, metaphylactic treatment with heparin to prevent EHM was initiated. Clinical signs were present in 61 horses (fever n = 55; EHM n = 8; abortion n = 6). Heparin (25000 IU subcutaneously twice daily for 3 days) was given to 31 febrile horses from day 10 of the outbreak, while the first 30 horses exhibiting fever remained untreated. Treatment outcome was analyzed retrospectively. Heparin-treated horses showed a lower EHM incidence (1/31; 3.2%) than untreated horses (7/30; 23.3%; p = 0.03). Results indicate that heparin may be useful for prevention of EHM during an EHV-1 outbreak. These promising data highlight the need for randomized and possibly blinded studies for the use of heparin in EHV-1 outbreaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15653/TPG-150451DOI Listing
October 2016

Clinical observations and management of a severe equine herpesvirus type 1 outbreak with abortion and encephalomyelitis.

Acta Vet Scand 2013 Mar 5;55:19. Epub 2013 Mar 5.

Klinik für Reproduktionsmedizin, Vetsuisse-Fakultät Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

Latent equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection is common in horse populations worldwide and estimated to reach a prevalence nearing 90% in some areas. The virus causes acute outbreaks of disease that are characterized by abortion and sporadic cases of myeloencephalopathy (EHM), both severe threats to equine facilities. Different strains vary in their abortigenic and neuropathogenic potential and the simultaneous occurrence of EHM and abortion is rare. In this report, we present clinical observations collected during an EHV-1 outbreak caused by a so-called "neuropathogenic" EHV-1 G(2254)/D(752) polymerase (Pol) variant, which has become more prevalent in recent years and is less frequently associated with abortions. In this outbreak with 61 clinically affected horses, 6/7 pregnant mares aborted and 8 horses developed EHM. Three abortions occurred after development of EHM symptoms. Virus detection was performed by nested PCR targeting gB from nasal swabs (11 positive), blood serum (6 positive) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (9 positive) of a total of 42 horses sampled. All 6 fetuses tested positive for EHV-1 by PCR and 4 by virus isolation. Paired serum neutralization test (SNT) on day 12 and 28 after the index case showed a significant (≥ 4-fold) increase in twelve horses (n = 42; 28.6%). This outbreak with abortions and EHM cases on a single equine facility provided a unique opportunity for the documentation of clinical disease progression as well as diagnostic procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1751-0147-55-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3630004PMC
March 2013

[Studies of Coxiella burnetii infections in dairy herds with special regard to infections in men].

Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr 2002 Sep-Oct;115(9-10):360-5

Rindergesundheitsdienst Stuttgart der Tierseuchenkasse Baden-Württemberg.

Investigations of 1167 dairy cows out of 105 herds with fertility disorders on secretion of Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) by the genitals as well as serological studies of these animals using ELISA demonstrated that C. burnetii infections are significantly associated with abortions but not with repeated inseminations without success or vaginal excretions. The demonstration of an increased risk of infections for persons caring for those dairy herds could be shown by a total of 253 serological studies. A comparison of these studies of farmers caring for dairy herds suffering from abortions a seroprevalence of > or = 20% showed that these persons revealed significantly more frequent antibodies against C. burnetii than farmers of the group compared with. Further studies showed that in herds suffering from abortions a seroprevalence of > or = 20% means an additional risk of infections of farmers. Vice versa abortions of the cows in herds with a seroprevalence of > or = 20% imply an additional infectious risk.
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December 2002