Publications by authors named "Christoffer Scavenius"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Callous-Unemotional Traits Do Not Predict Functional Family Therapy Outcomes for Adolescents With Behavior Problems.

Front Psychol 2020 18;11:537706. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Despite the availability of evidence-based treatment models for adolescent behavior problems, little is known about the effectiveness of these programs for adolescents with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Defined by lack of empathy, lack of guilt, flattened affect and lack of caring, CU traits have been linked to long-term anti-social behavior and unfavorable treatment outcomes and might be negatively related to outcomes in evidence-based programs such as Functional Family Therapy (FFT). This study used a single-group pre-post evaluation design with a sample of 407 adolescents (49.1% female, mean age = 14.4 years, = 1.9) receiving FFT to investigate whether outcomes in FFT are predicted by CU traits and to what extent reliable changes in CU traits can be observed. The results showed that although CU traits are related to increased problem severity at baseline, they predicted neither treatment dropout nor post-treatment externalizing behavior and family functioning. CU traits were related to diminished improvement ratings, in particular with respect to parental supervision. Reductions in CU traits were observed across the time of treatment, and these were most profound among adolescents with elevated levels of CU traits at baseline. Further research should investigate whether certain evidence-based treatment components are more suited for adolescents with CU, and if the addition of specific intervention elements for reducing CU-traits could further improve outcomes for this high-risk population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.537706DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7848225PMC
January 2021

Parent Management Training Oregon Model and Family-Based Services as Usual for Behavioral Problems in Youth: A National Randomized Controlled Trial in Denmark.

Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 2020 10;51(5):839-852

VIVE - The Danish Center for Social Science Research, Copenhagen, Denmark.

This randomized control trial used intent-to-treat analyses to compare parent management training-Oregon model (PMTO) (N = 64) to family-based services as usual (SAU) (N = 62) in 3.5-13-year-old children and their families in Denmark. Outcomes were parent report of child internalizing and externalizing problems, parenting efficacy, parenting stress, parent sense of coherence, parent-report of life satisfaction, and parental depressive symptoms. Outcomes were measured at pretreatment, post-treatment, and 18-20 months post-treatment. Results demonstrated that both PMTO and family-based SAU resulted in significant improvements in child externalizing and internalizing problems, parenting efficacy, as well as parent-reported stress and depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, and aspects of sense of cohesion. Effect sizes at post-treatment and follow-up were in the small to moderate range, consistent with prior PMTO evaluations. However, there were no significant differences between PMTO and family-based SAU. Further research on the process and content of family-based SAU is needed to determine how this approach overlaps with and is distinct from PMTO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10578-020-01028-yDOI Listing
October 2020

Adolescent Gender and Age Differences in Responsiveness to Functional Family Therapy.

Fam Process 2020 12 22;59(4):1465-1482. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Department of Applied Psychology, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, New York, NY.

The current study contributes to a sparse literature on moderators of Functional Family Therapy (FFT) by examining whether responsiveness to FFT, measured by a broad range of outcomes, varies by adolescent gender, age, and their interaction. This study was informed by 687 families (n, adolescents = 581; n, caregivers = 933) and utilized a pre-post comparison design. Fixed-effects regressions with gender, age, and their interaction included as explanatory variables were conducted to calculate the average change in youth mental health, callous-unemotional traits, academic outcomes, substance use, and family functioning. Moderation analyses revealed that according to parent report, girls had significantly greater improvements in peer problems and family functioning, and boys benefited more in increased liking of school. There were differential effects by age, such that older youth had less beneficial mental health outcomes and a smaller decrease in frequency of hash use. The gender by age interaction was significant for adolescents' report of mental health and family functioning outcomes, which suggests that girls benefit from FFT less than boys during early adolescence, but benefit more than boys in late adolescence. This finding adds to literature which has evidenced that family functioning is particularly important for girls by suggesting that FFT is important for improving older girls' mental health and family functioning in particular. The study's results expand the examination of outcomes of FFT to include academic outcomes, and provide insight into key factors that should be considered in addressing adolescent behavioral problems and family functioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/famp.12512DOI Listing
December 2020

An International Examination of the Effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy (FFT) in a Danish Community Sample.

J Marital Fam Ther 2020 Apr 13;46(2):289-303. Epub 2019 Sep 13.

New York University.

Youth behavior problems have increased in prevalence in Scandinavian countries. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) has been shown to be an effective intervention across diverse populations and international contexts. The current study examines the effectiveness of FFT within a Danish-community sample in a pre-post comparison design and includes 687 families. Observed outcomes included both parent- and/or youth- reported domains of youth behavior, family dysfunction, school attendance and performance, and substance use. Significant improvements were found in youth behavior, family functioning, and school-related outcomes (e.g., like of school and truancy) despite experiencing a 60% attrition rate in our sample postintervention. This study provides evidence for the effectiveness of FFT on a wide scale in a Scandinavian context, adding to previous research that supports the transportability of this intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jmft.12405DOI Listing
April 2020

Bending the Curve: A Community-Based Behavioral Parent Training Model to Address ADHD-Related Concerns in the Voluntary Sector in Denmark.

J Abnorm Child Psychol 2018 04;46(3):505-517

SFI-The Danish National Centre for Social Research, Herluf Trollesgade 11, DK-1052, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Limited access to evidence-based behavioral parent training (BPT) for addressing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been a growing concern internationally. Models to improve access to BPT are needed, particularly those that can be readily implemented in community settings and that leverage the potential workforce to increase capacity to deliver BPT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a BPT model which included oft-used content, methods, processes of BPT (common-elements), non-professionally delivered (task-shifted/shared) BPT intervention, and an efficient ancillary support system (training, fidelity, and supervision methods) for families of youth with parental concerns about ADHD. In a randomized controlled trial of 161 families of children (79% male; mean age 7.04 [1.55]), the Caring in Chaos (CiC) BPT model, delivered by community volunteers across 12 community-based sites in Denmark, was compared to a wait-list control condition on key child and parent outcomes at immediate post-treatment and 4-month follow-up assessment points. Results suggested that the CiC model led to significantly greater improvement in parenting behavior, parenting sense of competence, child functional impairment, parental stress and parental depressive symptoms compared to the wait list condition at immediate post-treatment, with maintenance of gains in most of these areas at follow-up assessment. No effect of intervention was found on ADHD symptoms. The results of this study suggest that developing efficient BPT intervention models, such as the CiC model, can result in readily implemented interventions by a variety of individuals in community settings. Such models are necessary to bend the curve on addressing unmet needs of families of youth with concerns about ADHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-017-0310-9DOI Listing
April 2018
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