Publications by authors named "Christine While"

7 Publications

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Advocating the rights of people with dementia to contribute to research: Considerations for researchers and ethics committees.

Australas J Ageing 2021 Nov 25. Epub 2021 Nov 25.

Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

Objective: Research involving people with dementia is vital to appropriately inform policy and practice decisions affecting this population. As dementia-care researchers, we frequently advocate to Human Research Ethics Committees for the right of people with dementia to choose whether to participate in research. This brief report provides some considerations for researchers and ethics committees.

Method: Descriptive summary of principles that argue for inclusion of people with dementia in research studies.

Results: Specifically excluding people living with dementia from research because of perceived cognitive impairment is inappropriate in light of human rights principles and the right to contribute to evidence-based care.

Conclusion: There is a difference between capacity to provide informed consent and ability to provide perspectives that are valid for each individual. Providing the opportunity for a person with dementia to participate in research and offering support to do this is a matter of human rights.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajag.13023DOI Listing
November 2021

Caring self-efficacy of direct care workers in residential aged care settings: A mixed methods scoping review.

Geriatr Nurs 2021 Oct 11;42(6):1429-1445. Epub 2021 Oct 11.

Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, 3086, Australia; School of Health, Federation University Australia, Berwick, Victoria, Australia; Department of Non-communicable Diseases, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh; Faculty of Public Health, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, Indonesia.

The caring self-efficacy of direct care workers in residential aged care has been explored in the literature mostly as a predictor rather than the focus of interest. This scoping review aimed to provide an overview of the existing literature on aged care workers' caring self-efficacy and factors that influence it. A systematic search was performed in six electronic databases. All primary studies were included. A total of 41 studies met the inclusion criteria. Caring self-efficacy was most often described by aged care workers as their capacity to deal with difficult situations. The self-efficacy scores of direct care workers were high across studies. Self-efficacy was positively influenced by access to resources, relationships with residents and their families, the support of supervisors and co-workers, job satisfaction, and training opportunities, and negatively affected by work pressure and burnout. Findings indicate possible avenues for intervention to improve direct care workers' self-efficacy in aged care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gerinurse.2021.09.014DOI Listing
October 2021

Self-efficacy of direct care workers providing care to older people in residential aged care settings: a scoping review protocol.

Syst Rev 2021 04 10;10(1):105. Epub 2021 Apr 10.

Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: Self-efficacy is developed through a person's interaction with his/her physical and social environment. Self-efficacy in caring is an essential attribute of care workers to develop a positive attitude towards their clients, improve work performance, and enhance job satisfaction. Care workers' self-efficacy may vary according to the context in which the care is being provided. Aged care is a multidimensional and challenging setting, and characteristics of aged care services are different from those of acute care services. The objective of this review is to give an overview of the self-efficacy of residential aged care workers in caring for older people and factors influencing their self-efficacy.

Methods: The protocol for this review is based on the Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewer's Manual for Scoping Review. A systematic search of the literature on electronic databases MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AgeLine, SCOPUS, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global will be carried out using predefined search terms to identify relevant studies. This review will include studies that examined the self-efficacy of direct care workers in caring for older people living in residential aged care facilities. All primary studies irrespective of the study design will be included. Studies conducted to develop measures or studies with informal care workers or students as study participants will not be considered. Two reviewers will independently conduct title and abstract screening, full-text screening, and data charting. A third reviewer will resolve discrepancies, while the final decision for conflicting studies will be made by consensus within the review team. Descriptive statistics will be utilized to analyze the quantitative findings, and the result will be presented in narrative form accompanied by tables and charts. Content analysis will be carried to analyze the qualitative findings and will be presented in narrative form supported by illustrative quotations.

Discussion: This study will be an important source of knowledge to policymakers and aged care providers to understand the self-efficacy of aged care workers to support and enhance their self-efficacy and thereby improve their caring behaviors towards their clients.

Scoping Review Registration: Joanna Briggs Institute Systematic Review Register with the title "A scoping review of factors influencing caring efficacy of direct care workers providing care to older people".
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-021-01655-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8035725PMC
April 2021

Consumer expectations and experiences of quality in Australian home-based community services.

Health Soc Care Community 2020 09 28;28(5):1459-1467. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia.

Australians want to live at home as they age and seek support from health and social care services to achieve this. The consumer driven market-based approach to community services in Australia has resulted in an increases in user's expectations of quality. What constitutes a quality service from the consumer's perspective is an important agenda to understand as the focus of care delivery moves to the domiciliary setting. This paper presents one aspect from a grounded theory PhD study, the aim of which was to understand the lived experience of receiving services in the home and its impact on the meaning of home. Participants were 11 people with dementia and 18 family supporters living in the state of Victoria, Australia. Data were collected between 2015 and 2017 through multiple interviews, photographic images, field notes and memos. NVIVO 10 qualitative analysis software program was used to support constant comparative analysis. Using a grounded theory approach, this study found that the decision to engage with community services was driven by the need to maintain autonomy, self-identity and home life. Participants sought quality services but discovered a dichotomy of positive and negative aspects in the way services were delivered. The most common reaction to the experience of poor-quality care was to reflect on their expectations for care quality; and manage the reality of what was delivered. Team work and service responsiveness were positive characteristics but were offset by service limitations and inefficiencies caused by poor communication and poor staff retention. The interpersonal relationships that participants developed with staff was highlighted; trust was an important factor whereas unreliable, task orientated and poorly trained staff would be rejected. The implications for policy and practice are described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12967DOI Listing
September 2020

An evaluation of Snoezelen(®) compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the symptoms of wandering and restlessness among residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

Geriatr Nurs 2015 Nov-Dec;36(6):462-6. Epub 2015 Aug 17.

Helen Macpherson Smith Institute of Community Health, Royal District Nursing Service, St Kilda, Victoria, Australia.

Snoezelen has become an increasingly popular therapy in residential aged care facilities in Australia and elsewhere, despite no conclusive evidence of its clinical efficacy. This paper reports on an evaluation of the use of Snoezelen compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the dementia related behaviors of wandering and restlessness in two residential aged care facilities in Victoria, Australia. Sixteen residents had their behavior and responses to Snoezelen or 'common best practice' observed and recorded over three time periods. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed there was a significant improvement in behaviors immediately after the intervention and after 60 min. However, no significant differences were found between residents receiving Snoezelen and 'common best practice' interventions for the reduction of the dementia related behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gerinurse.2015.07.005DOI Listing
January 2017

Medication management: the perspectives of people with dementia and family carers.

Dementia (London) 2013 Nov 16;12(6):734-50. Epub 2012 Apr 16.

Alzheimer's Australia Victoria, Australia.

The safe self management of medicines will be affected by the presence of dementia. A qualitative study using grounded theory was undertaken by a community nursing organisation in Melbourne, Australia, in order to develop a strength-based and person-centred approach to the assessment of medication ability. The perspectives of the person with dementia and their carers were explored to see if there were any significant differences in their medication management experiences when compared to those of older adults without dementia and their carers. People with dementia are able to sustain self management of their medicines using established routines and strategies. As cognitive changes affect short-term memory, external strategies and task allocation to family members are introduced by the individual to support their continuing independence. The family member assumed the carer role as their concern for medication safety increased, but this role engendered stress and a burden that was unacknowledged by the health professional.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301212444056DOI Listing
November 2013

Observational pain assessment scales for people with dementia: a review.

Br J Community Nurs 2009 Oct;14(10):438, 439-42

Royal District Nursing Service, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.

Dementia may alter the experience of pain and the ability to communicate it; this will, in turn, result in poor pain detection and inadequate treatment. The aim of this literature review is to identify the observational pain scales that have clinical utility and feasibility for use with people living with dementia in the community by district nurses in their daily practice. It was found that a consensus could not be reached on which tool to use in clinical practice. A further evaluation of the Non-communicative Patients Pain Assessment Instrument has improved its feasibility for use in the community environment, as it can be administered by family carers. This literature review concludes that observational pain scales need to be validated for use in the community and that there is a need to consider the involvement of the informal carer in the assessment of pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2009.14.10.44496DOI Listing
October 2009
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