Publications by authors named "Christine Wallace"

24 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dentoalveolar outcomes in maxillary reconstruction: A retrospective review of 85 maxillectomy reconstructions.

ANZ J Surg 2021 Jun 14. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Sydney Head and Neck Cancer Institute, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Although microvascular free flaps are often used to reconstruct maxillary defects, dentoalveolar rehabilitation is arguably less common despite its importance to midface function and aesthetics. The aim of this study is to review the contemporary management of maxillary defects in a single quaternary referral institution to identify factors that assist or impede dentoalveolar rehabilitation.

Methods: A retrospective review of maxillary reconstructions performed between February 2017 and December 2020 was performed. Patient characteristics, defect classification, operative techniques, complications and dentoalveolar outcomes were recorded.

Results: A total of 85 maxillary reconstructions were performed in 73 patients. Of the 64 patients where dental rehabilitation was required, 31 received a functional denture (48%) with 24 (38%) being implant-retained. Significant predictors of successful rehabilitation included the use of virtual surgical planning (VSP; 86% vs. 25%, p < 0.001), preoperative prosthodontic assessment (82% vs. 21%, p < 0.001), prefabrication (100% vs. 40%, p = 0.002) and use of the zygomatic implant perforator flap technique (100% vs. 39%, p = 0.001). Preoperative prosthodontic consultation was associated with 21-fold increase in the odds of rehabilitation (odds ratio 20.9, 95% confidence interval 6.54-66.66, p < 0.005).

Conclusion: Preoperative prosthodontic evaluation, VSP and reconstructive techniques developed to facilitate implant placement are associated with increased dental rehabilitation rates. Despite using an institutional algorithm, functional dentures are frequently prevented by factors including soft tissue constraints, disease recurrence and patient motivation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.17001DOI Listing
June 2021

Maxillofacial reconstruction with prefabricated prelaminated osseous free flaps.

ANZ J Surg 2021 03 6;91(3):430-438. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Sydney Head and Neck Cancer Institute, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: The prefabricated fibula flap is an advanced method of occlusal-based reconstruction that combines placement of osseointegrated dental implants with prelamination, using a split skin graft on the fibula, weeks prior to the definitive reconstruction. This approach is resource intensive but has several advantages including eliminating the delay from reconstruction to dental rehabilitation.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study of all prefabricated fibula flaps used for mandible and maxillary reconstruction from 2012 to 2020 was performed. Outcome measures were implant survival, implant utilization and functional dental rehabilitation.

Results: A total of 17 prefabricated fibula flaps were performed including two analogue and 15 digital plans. There were nine maxillary and eight mandibular reconstructions, of which 11 were primary and seven were secondary. There were no free flap failures. A total of 65 implants were placed (average 3.8, median 3 implants). There was one implant failure at 6 years giving a 1.5% failure rate. There was 91% implant utilization and 94% functional dental rehabilitation.

Conclusion: The prefabricated fibula flap provides outstanding dental rehabilitation in well-selected patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.16541DOI Listing
March 2021

Occlusal-based planning for dental rehabilitation following segmental resection of the mandible and maxilla.

ANZ J Surg 2021 03 27;91(3):451-452. Epub 2020 Nov 27.

Sydney Head and Neck Cancer Institute, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Reconstruction of the maxilla and mandible incorporating a dental prosthesis supported by dental implants is a complex process but has tremendous benefit to patient rehabilitation following ablative procedures. This study presents a protocol that can be used to aid other institutions to provide the highest standard of reconstruction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.16441DOI Listing
March 2021

Rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patients presenting with hypodontia: outcomes of implant rehabilitation part 1.

J Prosthodont Res 2018 Oct 24;62(4):473-478. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Oral Restorative Sciences, Westmead Centre for Oral Health, Westmead, NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

Purpose: This study has evaluated the pre and post perceptions of patients with ectodermal dysplasia (ED) who have been referred to Westmead Centre for Oral Health for treatment with dental implants.

Methods: Six patients with ED and hypodontia were treated with new maxillary complete dental prostheses or fixed implant prostheses, and a mandibular fixed dental prosthesis with implants. Patient perceptions were recorded with a 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS). All patients were asked to draw a line on the VAS which best described their feelings regarding aesthetics, chewing, diet and speech.

Results: Improvement in aesthetics was reported for all patients with change scores ranging from +9 to +4 points. Similarly, all patients reported an improvement in chewing ability with +6 point changes in 2 patients, and +8, +3, +7 and +1 in the other 4 patients. Five out of 6 patients reported less dietary restriction with 3 patients each indicating a change of +6 points, +4 points, +3 points, and 2 patients reporting +1 point change. Speech improved by +1 point for 3 patients, whilst 1 patient improved by +6 points, a further 2 patients scored no change.

Conclusions: Patients with ED treated with dental implants reported encouraging outcomes post treatment after prostheses were fitted. Follow-up from 1.6 to 6.8 years has confirmed these improvements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpor.2018.07.001DOI Listing
October 2018

Uranyl Peroxide Cage Cluster Solubility in Water and the Role of the Electrical Double Layer.

Inorg Chem 2017 Feb 11;56(3):1333-1339. Epub 2017 Jan 11.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame , Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States.

Uranium concentrations as high as 2.94 × 10 parts per million (1.82 mol of U/1 kg of HO) occur in water containing nanoscale uranyl cage clusters. The anionic cage clusters, with diameters of 1.5-2.5 nm, are charge-balanced by encapsulated cations, as well as cations within their electrical double layer in solution. The concentration of uranium in these systems is impacted by the countercations (K, Li, Na), and molecular dynamics simulations have predicted their distributions in selected cases. Formation of uranyl cages prevents hydrolysis reactions that would result in formation of insoluble uranyl solids under alkaline conditions, and these spherical clusters reach concentrations that require close packing in solution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b02435DOI Listing
February 2017

Tailoring Education to Perceived Fall Risk in Hospitalized Patients With Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Clin J Oncol Nurs 2016 Feb;20(1):84-9

Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU).

Background: Patients with cancer carry a higher risk for falls, potentially resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and financial costs, as well as lower quality of life. Few evidence-based interventions are tailored to the patient's perception of risk for falls.

Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of tailored, nurse-delivered interventions as compared to a control group on patient perception of risk for falls, confidence in fall prevention, and willingness to ask for assistance.

Methods: A two-group, prospective, randomized, controlled design was used to test the intervention in a convenience sample of 91 patients on an adult bone marrow transplantation unit. The intervention consisted of video and printed education tailored to the nurse's risk assessment and the patient's perception of risk. Patient's self-reported perception, confidence, and willingness were measured at three time points.

Findings: About one-third of patients perceived themselves to be at low risk for falls despite a nurse rating of high risk. A statistically significant difference existed in the proportion of patients who perceived themselves to be at high risk for falls pre- and postintervention (p = 0.01). Results suggest that tailoring education to the patients' perceived risk for falls can help patients become more aware of fall risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1188/16.CJON.84-89DOI Listing
February 2016

Cation-Dependent Hierarchical Assembly of U60 Nanoclusters into Macro-Ion Assemblies Imaged via Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy.

J Am Chem Soc 2016 Jan 28;138(1):191-8. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame , Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States.

Self-assembly of ([UO2(O2)OH]60)(60-) (U60), an actinide polyoxometalate with fullerene topology, can be induced by the addition of mono- and divalent cations to aqueous U60 solutions. Dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering lend important insights into assembly in this system, but direct imaging of U60 and its assemblies via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has remained an elusive goal. In this work, we used cryogenic TEM to image U60 and secondary and tertiary assemblies of U60 to characterize the size, morphology, and rate of formation of the secondary and tertiary structures. The kinetics and final morphologies of the secondary and tertiary structures strongly depend on the cation employed, with monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) leading to the highest rates and largest secondary and tertiary structures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.5b09802DOI Listing
January 2016

The Effect of Melatonin on Benzodiazepine Discontinuation and Sleep Quality in Adults Attempting to Discontinue Benzodiazepines: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Drugs Aging 2015 Dec;32(12):1009-18

Departments of Pediatrics and Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Background: Abrupt discontinuation of benzodiazepines often results in side effects including anxiety and insomnia, which can be barriers to discontinuation among long-term users. Melatonin improves the onset, duration, and quality of sleep. By preventing insomnia in those attempting to discontinue benzodiazepines, melatonin may facilitate benzodiazepine discontinuation.

Objectives: The primary objective was to determine the effect of melatonin compared with placebo on benzodiazepine discontinuation in adults attempting to discontinue benzodiazepines. The secondary objective was to determine the effect of melatonin on sleep quality in this population.

Methods: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception to November 2014. We included randomized controlled trials published in English comparing melatonin with placebo that reported benzodiazepine discontinuation or sleep quality. Two reviewers independently screened trials, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias.

Results: We included six trials randomizing 322 participants. The mean age of participants was approximately 64 years. The trials used varied tapering strategies to discontinue benzodiazepines over 4-10 weeks while using melatonin. Melatonin had no effect on the odds of successfully discontinuing benzodiazepines (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.21-2.41, p = 0.59). There was important heterogeneity among the trials (I (2) = 76%). The effect of melatonin on sleep quality was inconsistent.

Conclusions: Melatonin had no effect on benzodiazepine discontinuation while the effect of melatonin on sleep quality was inconsistent. We cannot rule out a role of melatonin in improving benzodiazepine discontinuation or sleep quality owing to imprecise effect estimates. Larger, well-designed, and reported randomized controlled trials may provide more valid and precise estimates of the effect of melatonin on these outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40266-015-0322-5DOI Listing
December 2015

Lead isotopic composition of trinitite melt glass: evidence for the presence of Canadian industrial lead in the first atomic weapon test.

Anal Chem 2013 Aug 12;85(15):7588-93. Epub 2013 Jul 12.

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States.

The Pb isotopic compositions for 51 spots of melt glass in 11 samples of trinitite have been determined by laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). Trinitite glass yields a large range of Pb isotopic compositions (i.e., (206)Pb/(204)Pb = 17.08-19.04), which reflect mixing between industrial Pb from materials used in the Trinity test and natural geologic components. Areas within trinitite melt glass containing high concentrations of both Cu and Pb, which are derived from the bomb and blast site-related components, were used for delineating the Pb isotopic composition corresponding to the anthropogenic Pb component. Comparison between the isotopic composition estimated here for the industrial Pb used in the Trinity test and those from known Pb deposits worldwide indicates close agreement with ore from the Buchans mine (Newfoundland, Canada). The Buchans mine was active during the time of the Trinity test and was operated by the American Smelting and Refining Company, which could have provided the Pb used in the test. The industrial Pb used in the Trinity test materials is not documented in the literature (or declassified) but could have been present in bricks, solder, pigs, or some other anthropogenic component related to the experiment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac4016648DOI Listing
August 2013

Hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters.

Inorg Chem 2013 Jul 13;52(13):7673-9. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, USA.

Two new hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide units were crystallized from aqueous solution under ambient conditions in approximately two months. The clusters are built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and are connected by employing a secondary metal linker, the 2-carboxyphenylphosphonate ligand. The structure of cluster A is composed of a ten-membered uranyl polyhedral belt that is capped on either end of an elongated cage by five-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. The structure of cluster B consists of 24 uranyl cations that are arranged into 6 four-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. Four of the corresponding topological squares are fused together to form a sixteen-membered double uranyl pseudobelt that is capped on either end by 2 topological squares. Cluster A crystallizes over a wide pH range of 4.6-6.8, while cluster B was isolated under narrower pH range of 6.9-7.8. Studies of their fate in aqueous solution upon dissolution of crystals by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provide evidence for their persistence in solution. The well-established characteristic fingerprint from the absorption spectra of the uranium(VI) cations disappears and becomes a nearly featureless peak; nonetheless, the two compounds fluoresce at room temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic4008262DOI Listing
July 2013

Isotopic fingerprinting of the world's first nuclear device using post-detonation materials.

Anal Chem 2013 Apr 2;85(8):4195-8. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States.

In the event of a rogue nuclear attack or interception of illicit nuclear materials, timely forensic investigations are critical for accurate source attribution. Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopic ratios of intercepted materials or postdetonation samples are, perhaps, the most valuable evidence in modern nuclear forensics. These ratios simultaneously provide information regarding the material's ''age'' (i.e., time elapsed since last purification), actinide concentrations, and relevant isotopic ratios/enrichment values. Consequently, these isotope signatures are invaluable in determining the origin, processing history, and intended purpose of any nuclear material. Here we show, for the first time, that it is feasible to determine the U and Pu isotopic compositions of historic nuclear devices from their postdetonation materials utilizing in situ U isotopic measurements. The U isotopic compositions of trinitite glass, produced subsequent to the world's first atomic explosion, indicate two sources: the device's tamper, composed of natural U that underwent fission during detonation, and natural U from the geological background. Enrichments in (234,235,236)U reflect the in situ decay of (238,239,240)Pu, the fuel used in the device. Time-integrated U isotopic modeling yields "supergrade" compositions, where (240)Pu/(239)Pu ≈ 0.01-0.03 and (238)Pu/(239)Pu ≈ 0.00011-0.00017, which are consistent with the Pu originating from the Hanford reactor. Spatially resolved U isotopic data of postdetonation debris reveal important details of the device in a relatively short time frame (hours). This capacity serves as an important deterrent to future nuclear threats and/or terrorist activities and is critical for source attribution and international security.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac400577pDOI Listing
April 2013

Postoperative management of hypoglycemia.

Orthop Nurs 2012 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-33; quiz 334-5

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes who are managed with insulin are at risk for developing hypoglycemia, a significant consequence of insulin therapy. Symptoms of hypoglycemia develop rapidly and the condition can be life threatening. It is imperative that the inpatient team, including the orthopaedic nurse, is able to recognize the signs and symptoms, respond appropriately, and prevent hypoglycemia. It is equally important to provide the patient with education to prevent, identify, and self-manage hypoglycemia at home. A case study example is included that addresses an elderly patient with Type 2 diabetes who had a total hip arthroplasty and developed hypoglycemia postoperatively while on an orthopaedic unit. Assessment, treatment, prevention, and patient self-management education of hypoglycemia are reviewed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NOR.0b013e31827424dfDOI Listing
November 2013

Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

Radiol Clin North Am 2011 Sep;49(5):949-68

Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.

Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child's clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcl.2011.06.002DOI Listing
September 2011

Homicidal methanol poisoning in a child.

J Anal Toxicol 2011 Sep;35(7):524-8

Monroe County Medical Examiner's Office, Rochester, New York 14623, USA.

A case of homicidal poisoning of a 21-month-old child using methanol is presented. The child was found dead in his crib during a court-ordered visit to his father's home. He reportedly was experiencing "flu-like" symptoms the day before. Routine toxicology testing of specimens taken at autopsy revealed the presence of methanol in a concentration of 0.21%, 0.23%, 0.31%, 0.28%, and 0.26% (w/v or w/w) in heart blood, venous blood, urine, vitreous humor, and gastric contents, respectively. Formic acid concentrations were 1.0 and 6.4 g/L in heart blood and urine. No other drugs or chemicals were detected in comprehensive screening. Accidental ingestion of methanol was ruled out; however, the homicide investigation was complicated by the fact that up to seven adults at three different locations had been involved in the child's care. Minimal information in the literature on the time frame for the development of symptoms of methanol intoxication in a child of this age made predicting a likely time of ingestion difficult. Discussion of the investigation and the timeline for the poisoning that was eventually established are included.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/anatox/35.7.524DOI Listing
September 2011

MRI diagnosis of trapped periosteum following incomplete closed reduction of distal tibial Salter-Harris II fracture.

Pediatr Radiol 2011 Dec 19;41(12):1591-4. Epub 2011 May 19.

Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

Irreducible fracture of the distal tibial physis due to interposed soft tissue including periosteum is well documented in the orthopedic literature but is uncommon. This condition has been associated with subsequent growth disturbance and requires open reduction. There are very few prior reports of MRI depiction of soft tissue interposition and none of periosteal interposition in the distal tibial physis. This is a relatively common location of physeal injury and related growth disturbance. We present a case of periosteum trapped in the distal tibial physis, diagnosed on MRI, in a Salter-Harris II fracture and its management implications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-011-2062-yDOI Listing
December 2011

Ultramicroscopy of bone at oral implant sites: a comparison of ED and control patients. Part 1-defining the protocol.

Int J Prosthodont 2011 Mar-Apr;24(2):147-54

The University of Sydney Westmead Centre for Oral Health, Westmead, Australia.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a protocol to analyze the microstructure of mandibular and maxillary bone in association with implant placement in ectodermal dysplasia (ED) and anodontia conditions compared to patients not suffering from such conditions.

Materials And Methods: This study was not additionally invasive, since the bone harvesting was completed at the time and site of implant placement. Bone samples were allocated into two groups (ED and control patients) and specified by the site of bone harvesting. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis at 5-Μm resolution was conducted on each bone sample. Computer analysis applying specialized CT analysis and software allowed evaluation of the three-dimensional microstructure of alveolar and basal bone samples for comparison of structural parameters.

Results: Ten bone samples (five alveolar and five basal) were harvested. Preliminary data confirmed the structural features and significant differences between alveolar and basal bone. Basal bone had greater absolute and percent bone volume, greater bone surface, and a lower trabecular bone pattern factor than alveolar bone.

Conclusion: Preliminary data were derived from bone harvested from both the maxilla and mandible of control patients, while bone samples from ED patients were harvested from only the anterior mandible. Further bone samples will provide more data on whether broader areas of bone harvesting, age, or sex affect the quality and quantity of the bone and influence implant treatment outcomes.
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June 2011

Entry/reentry, allied, and alternative careers: an IWLC Working Group report.

J Dent Educ 2011 Mar;75(3 Suppl):S31-32

University of Detroit Mercy, 4001 W. McNichols Rd., Detroit, MI 48221-3038, USA.

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March 2011

Hybrid uranium-oxalate fullerene topology cage clusters.

Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 2010 Sep;49(40):7271-3

Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201003197DOI Listing
September 2010

Images in anesthesiology: pyloric stenosis.

Anesthesiology 2010 May;112(5):1270

University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181d94e2dDOI Listing
May 2010

Injuries and conditions of the extensor mechanism of the pediatric knee.

Radiographics 2009 May-Jun;29(3):877-86

Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave N, Worcester, MA 01655, USA.

The extensor mechanism of the knee is essential to ambulation and is subject to a number of traumatic, congenital, and inflammatory processes. In the pediatric population, the spectrum of pathologic conditions affecting the extensor mechanism is specific to skeletally immature patients. In addition, certain congenital and developmental disorders may further predispose the knee extensor mechanism to injury. The pathologic processes can be subdivided into categories: conditions of the attachments and insertions of the quadriceps and patellar tendons, conditions of the patella, conditions of the quadriceps muscle group, and avulsions of the superior attachments of the quadriceps. Cases of conditions affecting the extensor mechanism of the pediatric knee were collected at two large trauma centers, and the clinical and radiologic features were reviewed. Initial evaluation of these conditions is performed with radiography, but magnetic resonance imaging has evolved into a useful adjunct for assessing the soft tissues for a more precise evaluation of the true extent of an injury, thereby affecting decisions about surgical intervention and prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.293085163DOI Listing
August 2009

The imaging of paediatric thoracic trauma.

Pediatr Radiol 2009 May 17;39(5):485-96. Epub 2009 Jan 17.

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Major chest trauma in a child is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is most frequently encountered within the context of multisystem injury following high-energy trauma such as a motor vehicle accident. The anatomic-physiologic make-up of children is such that the pattern of ensuing injuries differs from that in their adult counterparts. Pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, haemothorax and rib fractures are most commonly encountered. Although clinically more serious and potentially life threatening, tracheobronchial tear, aortic rupture and cardiac injuries are seldom observed. The most appropriate imaging algorithm is one tailored to the individual child and is guided by the nature of the traumatic event as well as clinical parameters. Chest radiography remains the first and most important imaging tool in paediatric chest trauma and should be supplemented with US and CT as indicated. Multidetector CT allows for the accurate diagnosis of most traumatic injuries, but should be only used in selected cases as its routine use in all paediatric patients would result in an unacceptably high radiation exposure to a large number of patients without proven clinical benefit. When CT is used, appropriate modifications should be incorporated so as to minimize the radiation dose to the patient whilst preserving diagnostic integrity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-008-1093-5DOI Listing
May 2009

Congenital torticollis caused by unilateral absence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

Pediatr Radiol 2009 Jan 7;39(1):77-9. Epub 2008 Oct 7.

Department of Radiology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, S2-824, (affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School), 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA.

Congenital torticollis is most commonly caused by benign fibrosis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Absence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle is a rare cause of congenital torticollis. There have been fewer than a dozen reported cases of agenesis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We describe a case of congenital absence of the sternocleidomastoid diagnosed by US and confirmed on MRI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-008-1021-8DOI Listing
January 2009

Best cases from the AFIP: intrarenal teratoma.

Radiographics 2005 Mar-Apr;25(2):481-5

Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.252045153DOI Listing
March 2006

Imaging evaluation of pediatric chest trauma.

Radiol Clin North Am 2005 Mar;43(2):267-81

Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Following a discussion of the various imaging manifestations of pediatric chest trauma by anatomic location, the authors discuss their diagnostic approach to the pediatric multitrauma patient with an emphasis on chest imaging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcl.2004.11.003DOI Listing
March 2005
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