Publications by authors named "Christine Massicotte"

9 Publications

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High Rate of Recurrent De Novo Mutations in Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathies.

Am J Hum Genet 2017 Nov;101(5):664-685

Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, St. Mary's Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M13 9WL, UK.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE) is a group of conditions characterized by the co-occurrence of epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), typically with developmental plateauing or regression associated with frequent epileptiform activity. The cause of DEE remains unknown in the majority of cases. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in 197 individuals with unexplained DEE and pharmaco-resistant seizures and in their unaffected parents. We focused our attention on de novo mutations (DNMs) and identified candidate genes containing such variants. We sought to identify additional subjects with DNMs in these genes by performing targeted sequencing in another series of individuals with DEE and by mining various sequencing datasets. We also performed meta-analyses to document enrichment of DNMs in candidate genes by leveraging our WGS dataset with those of several DEE and ID series. By combining these strategies, we were able to provide a causal link between DEE and the following genes: NTRK2, GABRB2, CLTC, DHDDS, NUS1, RAB11A, GABBR2, and SNAP25. Overall, we established a molecular diagnosis in 63/197 (32%) individuals in our WGS series. The main cause of DEE in these individuals was de novo point mutations (53/63 solved cases), followed by inherited mutations (6/63 solved cases) and de novo CNVs (4/63 solved cases). De novo missense variants explained a larger proportion of individuals in our series than in other series that were primarily ascertained because of ID. Moreover, these DNMs were more frequently recurrent than those identified in ID series. These observations indicate that the genetic landscape of DEE might be different from that of ID without epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5673604PMC
November 2017

Joubert Syndrome in French Canadians and Identification of Mutations in CEP104.

Am J Hum Genet 2015 Nov 17;97(5):744-53. Epub 2015 Oct 17.

McGill University and Génome Québec Innovation Centre, Montreal, QC H3A 1A4, Canada.

Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is a primarily autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a distinctive mid-hindbrain and cerebellar malformation, oculomotor apraxia, irregular breathing, developmental delay, and ataxia. JBTS is a genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. We sought to characterize the genetic landscape associated with JBTS in the French Canadian (FC) population. We studied 43 FC JBTS subjects from 35 families by combining targeted and exome sequencing. We identified pathogenic (n = 32 families) or possibly pathogenic (n = 2 families) variants in genes previously associated with JBTS in all of these subjects, except for one. In the latter case, we found a homozygous splice-site mutation (c.735+2T>C) in CEP104. Interestingly, we identified two additional non-FC JBTS subjects with mutations in CEP104; one of these subjects harbors a maternally inherited nonsense mutation (c.496C>T [p.Arg166*]) and a de novo splice-site mutation (c.2572-2A>G), whereas the other bears a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.1328_1329insT [p.Tyr444fs*3]) in CEP104. Previous studies have shown that CEP104 moves from the mother centriole to the tip of the primary cilium during ciliogenesis. Knockdown of CEP104 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE1) cells resulted in severe defects in ciliogenesis. These observations suggest that CEP104 acts early during cilia formation by regulating the conversion of the mother centriole into the cilia basal body. We conclude that disruption of CEP104 causes JBTS. Our study also reveals that the cause of JBTS has been elucidated in the great majority of our FC subjects (33/35 [94%] families), even though JBTS shows substantial locus and allelic heterogeneity in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4667103PMC
November 2015

Loss-of-function de novo mutations play an important role in severe human neural tube defects.

J Med Genet 2015 Jul 24;52(7):493-7. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

CHU Ste-Justine Research Center, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Background: Neural tube defects (NTDs) are very common and severe birth defects that are caused by failure of neural tube closure and that have a complex aetiology. Anencephaly and spina bifida are severe NTDs that affect reproductive fitness and suggest a role for de novo mutations (DNMs) in their aetiology.

Methods: We used whole-exome sequencing in 43 sporadic cases affected with myelomeningocele or anencephaly and their unaffected parents to identify DNMs in their exomes.

Results: We identified 42 coding DNMs in 25 cases, of which 6 were loss of function (LoF) showing a higher rate of LoF DNM in our cohort compared with control cohorts. Notably, we identified two protein-truncating DNMs in two independent cases in SHROOM3, previously associated with NTDs only in animal models. We have demonstrated a significant enrichment of LoF DNMs in this gene in NTDs compared with the gene specific DNM rate and to the DNM rate estimated from control cohorts. We also identified one nonsense DNM in PAX3 and two potentially causative missense DNMs in GRHL3 and PTPRS.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates an important role of LoF DNMs in the development of NTDs and strongly implicates SHROOM3 in its aetiology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2015-103027DOI Listing
July 2015

De novo mutations in moderate or severe intellectual disability.

PLoS Genet 2014 Oct 30;10(10):e1004772. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Department of Neurosciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.

Genetics is believed to have an important role in intellectual disability (ID). Recent studies have emphasized the involvement of de novo mutations (DNMs) in ID but the extent to which they contribute to its pathogenesis and the identity of the corresponding genes remain largely unknown. Here, we report a screen for DNMs in subjects with moderate or severe ID. We sequenced the exomes of 41 probands and their parents, and confirmed 81 DNMs affecting the coding sequence or consensus splice sites (1.98 DNMs/proband). We observed a significant excess of de novo single nucleotide substitutions and loss-of-function mutations in these cases compared to control subjects, suggesting that at least a subset of these variations are pathogenic. A total of 12 likely pathogenic DNMs were identified in genes previously associated with ID (ARID1B, CHD2, FOXG1, GABRB3, GATAD2B, GRIN2B, MBD5, MED13L, SETBP1, TBR1, TCF4, WDR45), resulting in a diagnostic yield of ∼29%. We also identified 12 possibly pathogenic DNMs in genes (HNRNPU, WAC, RYR2, SET, EGR1, MYH10, EIF2C1, COL4A3BP, CHMP2A, PPP1CB, VPS4A, PPP2R2B) that have not previously been causally linked to ID. Interestingly, no case was explained by inherited mutations. Protein network analysis indicated that the products of many of these known and candidate genes interact with each other or with products of other ID-associated genes further supporting their involvement in ID. We conclude that DNMs represent a major cause of moderate or severe ID.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1004772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4214635PMC
October 2014

Mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase IARS2 in patients with cataracts, growth hormone deficiency with short stature, partial sensorineural deafness, and peripheral neuropathy or with Leigh syndrome.

Hum Mutat 2014 Nov 18;35(11):1285-9. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Mutations in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a range of clinical phenotypes. Here, we report a novel disorder in three adult patients with a phenotype including cataracts, short-stature secondary to growth hormone deficiency, sensorineural hearing deficit, peripheral sensory neuropathy, and skeletal dysplasia. Using SNP genotyping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a single likely causal variant, a missense mutation in a conserved residue of the nuclear gene IARS2, encoding mitochondrial isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase. The mutation is homozygous in the affected patients, heterozygous in carriers, and absent in control chromosomes. IARS2 protein level was reduced in skin cells cultured from one of the patients, consistent with a pathogenic effect of the mutation. Compound heterozygous mutations in IARS2 were independently identified in a previously unreported patient with a more severe mitochondrial phenotype diagnosed as Leigh syndrome. This is the first report of clinical findings associated with IARS2 mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.22629DOI Listing
November 2014

Mutations in TMEM231 cause Joubert syndrome in French Canadians.

J Med Genet 2012 Oct 25;49(10):636-41. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

Centre of Excellence in Neurosciences of Université de Montréal and Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1C5.

Background: Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is a predominantly autosomal recessive disorder characterised by a distinctive midhindbrain malformation, oculomotor apraxia, breathing abnormalities and developmental delay. JBTS is genetically heterogeneous, involving genes required for formation and function of non-motile cilia. Here we investigate the genetic basis of JBTS in 12 French-Canadian (FC) individuals.

Methods And Results: Exome sequencing in all subjects showed that six of them carried rare compound heterozygous mutations in CC2D2A or C5ORF42, known JBTS genes. In addition, three individuals (two families) were compound heterozygous for the same rare mutations in TMEM231(c.12T>A[p.Tyr4*]; c.625G>A[p.Asp209Asn]). All three subjects showed a severe neurological phenotype and variable presence of polydactyly, retinopathy and renal cysts. These mutations were not detected among 385 FC controls. TMEM231 has been previously shown to localise to the ciliary transition zone, and to interact with several JBTS gene products in a complex involved in the formation of the diffusion barrier between the cilia and plasma membrane. siRNA knockdown of TMEM231 was also shown to affect barrier integrity, resulting in a reduction of cilia formation and ciliary localisation of signalling receptors.

Conclusions: Our data suggest that mutations in TMEM231 cause JBTS, reinforcing the relationship between this condition and the disruption of the barrier at the ciliary transition zone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2012-101132DOI Listing
October 2012

Mutations in C5ORF42 cause Joubert syndrome in the French Canadian population.

Am J Hum Genet 2012 Apr 15;90(4):693-700. Epub 2012 Mar 15.

Centre of Excellence in Neurosciences, Université de Montréal and Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center, Montréal, QC, Canada.

Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a distinctive mid-hindbrain malformation, developmental delay with hypotonia, ocular-motor apraxia, and breathing abnormalities. Although JBTS was first described more than 40 years ago in French Canadian siblings, the causal mutations have not yet been identified in this family nor in most French Canadian individuals subsequently described. We ascertained a cluster of 16 JBTS-affected individuals from 11 families living in the Lower St. Lawrence region. SNP genotyping excluded the presence of a common homozygous mutation that would explain the clustering of these individuals. Exome sequencing performed on 15 subjects showed that nine affected individuals from seven families (including the original JBTS family) carried rare compound-heterozygous mutations in C5ORF42. Two missense variants (c.4006C>T [p.Arg1336Trp] and c.4690G>A [p.Ala1564Thr]) and a splicing mutation (c.7400+1G>A), which causes exon skipping, were found in multiple subjects that were not known to be related, whereas three other truncating mutations (c.6407del [p.Pro2136Hisfs*31], c.4804C>T [p.Arg1602*], and c.7477C>T [p.Arg2493*]) were identified in single individuals. None of the unaffected first-degree relatives were compound heterozygous for these mutations. Moreover, none of the six putative mutations were detected among 477 French Canadian controls. Our data suggest that mutations in C5ORF42 explain a large portion of French Canadian individuals with JBTS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3322222PMC
April 2012

Excess of de novo deleterious mutations in genes associated with glutamatergic systems in nonsyndromic intellectual disability.

Am J Hum Genet 2011 Mar 3;88(3):306-16. Epub 2011 Mar 3.

Centre of Excellence in Neuromics of Université de Montréal, Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Centre, Montréal, Canada.

Little is known about the genetics of nonsyndromic intellectual disability (NSID). We hypothesized that de novo mutations (DNMs) in synaptic genes explain an important fraction of sporadic NSID cases. In order to investigate this possibility, we sequenced 197 genes encoding glutamate receptors and a large subset of their known interacting proteins in 95 sporadic cases of NSID. We found 11 DNMs, including ten potentially deleterious mutations (three nonsense, two splicing, one frameshift, four missense) and one neutral mutation (silent) in eight different genes. Calculation of point-substitution DNM rates per functional and neutral site showed significant excess of functional DNMs compared to neutral ones. De novo truncating and/or splicing mutations in SYNGAP1, STXBP1, and SHANK3 were found in six patients and are likely to be pathogenic. De novo missense mutations were found in KIF1A, GRIN1, CACNG2, and EPB41L1. Functional studies showed that all these missense mutations affect protein function in cell culture systems, suggesting that they may be pathogenic. Sequencing these four genes in 50 additional sporadic cases of NSID identified a second DNM in GRIN1 (c.1679_1681dup/p.Ser560dup). This mutation also affects protein function, consistent with structural predictions. None of these mutations or any other DNMs were identified in these genes in 285 healthy controls. This study highlights the importance of the glutamate receptor complexes in NSID and further supports the role of DNMs in this disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3059427PMC
March 2011

What is your diagnosis? Diskospondylitis.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010 Dec;237(11):1245-6

Veterinary Specialty Hospital, Ave San Patricio 783, Urbanisation Las Lomas, San Juan, PR 00921.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.237.11.1245DOI Listing
December 2010