Publications by authors named "Christine M Gerula"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Factors Associated with Disparities in Appropriate Statin Therapy in an Outpatient Inner City Population.

Healthcare (Basel) 2020 Sep 24;8(4). Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Department of Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

Lipid-lowering therapies are essential for the primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The aim of this study is to identify discrepancies between cholesterol management guidelines and current practice with a focus on statin treatment in an underserved population based in a large single urban medical center. Among 1042 reviewed records, we identified 464 statin-eligible patients. Age was 61.0 ± 10.4 years and 53.9% were female. Most patients were black (47.2%), followed by Hispanic (45.7%) and white (5.0%). In total, 82.1% of patients were prescribed a statin. An appropriate statin was not prescribed in 32.4% of statin-eligible patients who qualified based only on a 10-year ASCVD risk of ≥7.5%. After adjustment for gender and health insurance status, appropriate statin treatment was independently associated with age >55 years (OR = 4.59 (95% CI 1.09-16.66), = 0.026), hypertension (OR = 2.38 (95% CI 1.29-4.38), = 0.005) and chronic kidney disease (OR = 3.95 (95% CI 1.42-14.30), = 0.017). Factors independently associated with statin undertreatment were black race (OR = 0.42 (95% CI 0.23-0.77), = 0.005) and statin-eligibility based solely on an elevated 10-year ASCVD risk (OR = 0.14 (95% CI 0.07-0.25), < 0.001). Hispanic patients were more likely to be on appropriate statin therapy when compared to black patients (86.8% vs. 77.2%). Statin underprescription is seen in approximately one out of five eligible patients and is independently associated with black race, younger age, fewer comorbidities and eligibility via 10-year ASCVD risk only. Hispanic patients are more likely to be on appropriate statin therapy compared to black patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7712578PMC
September 2020

New oral anticoagulants: good but not good enough!

J Am Coll Cardiol 2012 Oct;60(15):1434; author reply 1434-5

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2012.06.027DOI Listing
October 2012

A massive right atrial cavernous hemangioma.

J Card Surg 2011 May 14;26(3):295. Epub 2011 Jan 14.

Department of Pathology, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey 07101-1709, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8191.2010.01186.xDOI Listing
May 2011

Inspiratory muscle weakness in diastolic dysfunction.

Chest 2004 Sep;126(3):838-44

University Hospital #I354, 100 Bergen St, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

Objectives: To test the hypothesis that patients with well-documented diastolic dysfunction (DD) in the setting of normal systolic function will have inspiratory muscle weakness when compared to normal control subjects, and will experience dyspnea and tachypnea during exercise.

Background: Respiratory muscle weakness has been described in patients with (systolic) congestive heart failure; however, whether or not patients with DD may present with the findings of congestive heart failure is not known.

Methods: We selected for study 14 patients with DD previously referred for cardiopulmonary evaluation whose diagnosis had been confirmed by data obtained at cardiac catheterization. Seven control subjects matched for age, sex, and weight were recruited from the hospital community. Subjects performed both basic pulmonary function tests and tests of muscle strength: handgrip strength (Hgr), and maximal subatmospheric static inspiratory muscle pressure (Pimax). Subjects then performed a graded exercise test on a bicycle ergometer. Minute ventilation, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and heart rate were monitored continuously. Echocardiography was performed three times: before exercise, at a selected submaximal exercise level (20% of a predicted maximal workload), and at maximal exercise. Subjects rated their degree of dyspnea using the Borg scale at the same three time intervals.

Results: Pimax was - 102 +/- 17 cm H(2)O in control subjects, and - 77 +/- 19 cm H(2)O in patients with DD (p = 0.013) [mean +/- SD]. Hgr was similar between the groups. At the selected submaximal exercise level, patients with DD rated dyspnea to be 2.6 +/- 2.2 Borg scale units (control subjects, 0.5 +/- 0.8 Borg scale units). Hey plots described a rapid, shallow breathing pattern in patients with DD during exercise. Patients with DD and control subjects achieved similar maximal work loads.

Conclusion: Patients with DD have diminished Pimax, adopt a rapid, shallow breathing pattern during exercise, and experience dyspnea at low work loads when compared to matched control subjects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.126.3.838DOI Listing
September 2004