Publications by authors named "Christine Finley"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Peer-Based Strategy to Overcome HPV Vaccination Inequities in Rural Communities: A Physical Distancing-Compliant Approach.

Crit Rev Eukaryot Gene Expr 2021 ;31(1):61-69

KM Consulting, New Jersey, USA.

The human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine is the world's first proven and effective vaccine to prevent cancers in males and females when administered pre-exposure. Like most of the US, barely half of Vermont teens are up-to-date with the vaccination, with comparable deficits in New Hampshire and Maine. The rates for HPV vaccine initiation and completion are as low as 33% in rural New England. Consequently, there is a compelling responsibility to communicate its importance to unvaccinated teenagers before their risk for infection increases. Messaging in rural areas promoting HPV vaccination is compromised by community-based characteristics that include access to appropriate medical care, poor media coverage, parental and peer influence, and skepticism of science and medicine. Current strategies are predominantly passive access to literature and Internet-based information. Evidence indicates that performance-based messaging can clarify the importance of HPV vaccination to teenagers and their parents in rural areas. Increased HPV vaccination will significantly contribute to the prevention of a broadening spectrum of cancers. Reducing rurality-based inequities is a public health priority. Development of a performance-based peer-communication intervention can capture a window of opportunity to provide increasingly effective and sustained HPV protection. An effective approach can be partnering rural schools and regional health teams with a program that is nimble and scalable to respond to public health policies and practices compliant with COVID-19 pandemic-related modifications on physical distancing and interacting in the foreseeable future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1615/CritRevEukaryotGeneExpr.2021036945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8128079PMC
March 2021

The Role of the Dental Community in Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Through HPV Vaccine Advocacy.

J Cancer Educ 2021 Apr;36(2):299-304

Robert Larner, MD College of Medicine, University of Vermont, 89 Beaumont Ave, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA.

As rates of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) continue to rise, the dental community's role in primary prevention efforts related to HPV vaccination will become increasingly important. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, beliefs, practices, and perceived barriers regarding HPV and HPV vaccine advocacy within the dental community. A sample of 266 dentists and dental hygienists completed an online survey, and responses were then analyzed using frequencies of responses, t tests, chi-square tests, and Spearman's correlations. Ninety percent of providers believe it is important to play an "active role" in their patients' general medical care, yet only 50% believe it is their responsibility to recommend the HPV vaccine. Only 50% feel knowledgeable enough to recommend the vaccine. 78.6% of providers rarely discuss HPV vaccination with their age-appropriate patients, and 82% rarely recommend the vaccine. The two most strongly agreed-upon barriers were "parent concerns about the safety or efficacy of the vaccine" (71.6%) and "parent opposition to HPV vaccination for philosophical or religious reasons" (72.6%). Dentists were more knowledgeable about HPV vaccination and more likely to recommend the vaccine than hygienists. Higher levels of HPV-related knowledge correlated positively with beliefs and practices that support HPV vaccine advocacy. We have identified multiple opportunities for intervention aimed at increasing vaccine advocacy among oral health providers. These include clarification of role from dental professional organizations, alleviation of concerns related to perceived parental objection to the vaccine, and educational interventions targeting knowledge deficits among oral health providers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-01628-wDOI Listing
April 2021

Pertussis Vaccine Effectiveness in the Setting of Pertactin-Deficient Pertussis.

Pediatrics 2016 05 12;137(5). Epub 2016 Apr 12.

Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, and.

Background: In the United States, the proportion of Bordetella pertussis isolates lacking pertactin, a component of acellular pertussis vaccines, increased from 14% in 2010 to 85% in 2012. The impact on vaccine effectiveness (VE) is unknown.

Methods: We conducted 2 matched case-control evaluations in Vermont to assess VE of the 5-dose diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) series among 4- to 10-year-olds, and tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) among 11- to 19-year-olds. Cases reported during 2011 to 2013 were included. Three controls were matched to each case by medical home, and additionally by birth year for the Tdap evaluation. Vaccination history was obtained from medical records and parent interviews. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated by using conditional logistic regression; VE was estimated as (1-OR) × 100%. Pertactin status was determined for cases with available isolates.

Results: Overall DTaP VE was 84% (95% confidence interval [CI] 58%-94%). VE within 12 months of dose 5 was 90% (95% CI 71%-97%), declining to 68% (95% CI 10%-88%) by 5-7 years post-vaccination. Overall Tdap VE was 70% (95% CI 54%-81%). Within 12 months of Tdap vaccination, VE was 76% (95% CI 60%-85%), declining to 56% (95% CI 16%-77%) by 2-4 years post-vaccination. Of cases with available isolates, >90% were pertactin-deficient.

Conclusions: Our DTaP and Tdap VE estimates remain similar to those found in other settings, despite high prevalence of pertactin deficiency in Vermont, suggesting these vaccines continue to be protective against reported pertussis disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-3973DOI Listing
May 2016

Factors contributing to suboptimal rates of childhood vaccinations in Vermont.

J Child Health Care 2015 Dec 12;19(4):558-68. Epub 2014 May 12.

University of Vermont College of Medicine, USA

Childhood immunizations are invaluable in preventing contagious diseases. Nonetheless, vaccines have become increasingly controversial with growing numbers of caregivers refusing to vaccinate their children. The percentage of fully vaccinated children in Vermont is one of the lowest nationally. This study set out to determine Vermont caregivers' attitudes toward immunizations to better explain why the percentage of fully vaccinated children has fallen in Vermont. A survey regarding caregivers' health care knowledge about children, their vaccination concerns, and their children's vaccination status was sent to participants in the Vermont Women, Infants and Children's Program from two districts. In total, 83% (n = 379) of respondents reported their children received all recommended vaccinations for their age. Respondents who considered themselves highly knowledgeable regarding their children's health care and confident about the safety of vaccinations were significantly associated with reporting their children as being current on vaccinations and with their intent to continue vaccinations. Respondents indicated highest concern regarding the safety and number of vaccinations administered during one visit. Primary care providers were indicated as important resources for addressing concerns about vaccinations and health care knowledge of children. The results help to understand low vaccination rates in Vermont and can be used for targeting health campaigns to improve vaccination rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367493514530955DOI Listing
December 2015