Publications by authors named "Chotika Yokthongwattana"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparative secretome analysis between salinity-tolerant and control Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains.

Planta 2021 Feb 16;253(3):68. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, 50 Ngamwongwan Rd., Bangkok, 10900, Thailand.

Main Conclusion: Secretome analysis of a salt-tolerant and control Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed 514 differentially expressed proteins. Membrane transport and trafficking, signal transduction and channel proteins were up-regulated in the ST secretome. Salinity is a major abiotic stress that limits crop production worldwide. Multiple adverse effects have been reported in many living organisms exposed to high-saline concentrations. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is known for secreting proteins in response to many environmental stresses. A salinity-tolerant (ST) strain of Chlamydomonas has been developed, whose cells were able to grow at 300 mM NaCl. The current study analyzed the secretomes of ST grown in TAP medium supplemented with 300 mM NaCl and the laboratory strain CC-503 grown in TAP medium without NaCl supplement. In total, 514 secreted proteins were identified of which 203 were up-regulated and 110 were down-regulated. Bioinformatic analysis predicted 168 proteins to be secreted or in the conventional secretory pathway. Out of these, 70 were up-regulated, while 51 proteins were down-regulated. Proteins involved in membrane transport and trafficking, signal transduction and channel proteins were altered in their expression in the ST secretome, suggesting the response of saline stress acts toward not only the intracellular pool of proteins but also the extracellular proteins. This also suggested that the secreted proteins might have roles in the extracellular space. Signal peptide (SP) prediction revealed that almost 40% of the predicted secreted proteins contained a signal peptide; however, a high proportion of proteins lacked an SP, suggesting that these proteins might be secreted through an unconventional protein secretion pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-021-03583-7DOI Listing
February 2021

Gene expression and promoter characterization of heat-shock protein 90B gene (HSP90B) in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Plant Sci 2018 Jul 17;272:107-116. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 272 Rama 6 Rd., Bangkok 10400, Thailand; Center for Excellence in Protein and Enzyme Technology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 272 Rama 6 Rd., Bangkok 10400, Thailand. Electronic address:

Molecular chaperones or heat shock proteins are a large protein family with important functions in every cellular organism. Among all types of the heat shock proteins, information on the ER-localized HSP90 protein (HSP90B) and its encoding gene is relatively scarce in the literature, especially in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, expression profiles as well as promoter sequence of the HSP90B gene were investigated in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have found that HSP90B is strongly induced by heat and ER stresses, while other short-term exposure to abiotic stresses, such as salinity, dark-to-light transition or light stress does not appear to affect the expression. Promoter truncation analysis as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation using the antibodies recognizing histone H3 and acetylated histone H3, revealed a putative core constitutive promoter sequence between -1 to -253 bp from the transcription start site. Our results also suggested that the nucleotides upstream of the core promoter may contain repressive elements such as putative repressor binding site(s).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plantsci.2018.04.010DOI Listing
July 2018

Comparative proteomic analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control and a salinity-tolerant strain revealed a differential protein expression pattern.

Planta 2017 Nov 7;246(5):843-856. Epub 2017 Jul 7.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, 50 Ngamwongwan Rd., Bangkok, 10900, Thailand.

Main Conclusion: Proteins involved in membrane transport and trafficking, stress and defense, iron uptake and metabolism, as well as proteolytic enzymes, were remarkably up-regulated in the salinity-tolerant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Excessive concentration of NaCl in the environment can cause adverse effects on plants and microalgae. Successful adaptation of plants to long-term salinity stress requires complex cellular adjustments at different levels from molecular, biochemical and physiological processes. In this study, we developed a salinity-tolerant strain (ST) of the model unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, capable of growing in medium containing 300 mM NaCl. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed to assess differential protein expression pattern between the ST and the control progenitor cells. Proteins involved in membrane transport and trafficking, stress and defense, iron uptake and metabolism, as well as protein degradation, were remarkably up-regulated in the ST cells, suggesting the importance of these processes in acclimation mechanisms to salinity stress. Moreover, 2-DE-based proteomic also revealed putative salinity-specific post-translational modifications (PTMs) on several important housekeeping proteins. Discussions were made regarding the roles of these differentially expressed proteins and the putative PTMs in cellular adaptation to long-term salinity stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-017-2734-4DOI Listing
November 2017

Bioactivities of Jc-SCRIP, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Jatropha curcas seed coat.

Chem Biol Drug Des 2013 Oct;82(4):453-62

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, 50 Ngamwongwan Rd., Chatujak, Bangkok 10900, Thailand.

In this study, a type 1 RIP, designated as Jc-SCRIP, was first isolated from the seed coat of Jatropha curcas Linn. It was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel™ and CM-cellulose columns. Purification fold of Jc-SCRIP increased 113.8 times, and the yield was 1.13% of the total protein in the final step. It was shown to be a monomeric glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 38 938 Da, as determined by MALDI-TOF/MS. It exhibited hemagglutination activity and possessed strong N-glycosidase activity. The antimicrobial activity of Jc-SCRIP was tested against nine human pathogenic bacteria and one fungus; the most potent inhibitory activity was against Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, with minimum inhibitory concentration value of 0.20 μm. Jc-SCRIP demonstrated in vitro cytotoxicity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7), a colon adenocarcinoma (SW620), and a liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2), with IC50 values of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.40 mm, respectively. The results suggested that Jc-SCRIP may be a potential natural antimicrobial and anticancer agent in medical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cbdd.12175DOI Listing
October 2013

Proteomic analysis of salinity-stressed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed differential suppression and induction of a large number of important housekeeping proteins.

Planta 2012 Mar 26;235(3):649-59. Epub 2012 Jan 26.

Department of Biochemistry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand.

Salinity stress is one of the most common abiotic stresses that hamper plant productivity worldwide. Successful plant adaptations to salt stress require substantial changes in cellular protein expression. In this work, we present a 2-DE-based proteomic analysis of a model unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, subjected to 300 mM NaCl for 2 h. Results showed that, in addition to the protein spots that showed partial up- or down-regulation patterns, a number of proteins were exclusively present in the proteome of the control cells, but were absent from the salinity-stressed samples. Conversely, a large number of proteins exclusively appeared in the proteome of the salinity-stressed samples. Of those exclusive proteins, we could successfully identify, via LC-MS/MS, 18 spots uniquely present in the control cells and 99 spots specific to NaCl-treated cells. Interestingly, among the salt-exclusive protein spots, we identified several important housekeeping proteins like molecular chaperones and proteins of the translation machinery, suggesting that they may originate from post-translational modifications rather than from de novo biosynthesis. The possible role and the salt-specific modification of these proteins by salinity stress are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-012-1594-1DOI Listing
March 2012

MOM1 and Pol-IV/V interactions regulate the intensity and specificity of transcriptional gene silencing.

EMBO J 2010 Jan 12;29(2):340-51. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

Department of Plant Biology, University of Geneva, Sciences III, Geneva, Switzerland.

It is commonly observed that onset or release of transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) correlates with alteration of repressive epigenetic marks. The TGS regulator MOM1 in Arabidopsis is exceptional since it regulates transcription in intermediate heterochromatin with only minor changes in epigenetic marks. We have isolated an enhancer of the mom1 mutation that points towards regulatory interplay between MOM1 and RNA polymerase-V (Pol-V). Pol-V transcribes heterochromatic loci, which seems to be required for maintenance of their silencing; however, it is still not clear how Pol-V is targeted to heterochromatin. We now provide evidence that Pol-V is required for MOM1-mediated suppression of transcription at a subset of its chromosomal targets. Thus, Pol-V genetically interacts with MOM1 in the control of gene silencing. Interestingly, functional cooperation of MOM1 and Pol-V not only broadens the range of the controlled loci in comparison to each individual factor, but also determines the degree of TGS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2009.328DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2824458PMC
January 2010

Divergent evolution of CHD3 proteins resulted in MOM1 refining epigenetic control in vascular plants.

PLoS Genet 2008 Aug 22;4(8):e1000165. Epub 2008 Aug 22.

Laboratory of Plant Genetics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Arabidopsis MOM1 is required for the heritable maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Unlike many other silencing factors, depletion of MOM1 evokes transcription at selected loci without major changes in DNA methylation or histone modification. These loci retain unusual, bivalent chromatin properties, intermediate to both euchromatin and heterochromatin. The structure of MOM1 previously suggested an integral nuclear membrane protein with chromatin-remodeling and actin-binding activities. Unexpected results presented here challenge these presumed MOM1 activities and demonstrate that less than 13% of MOM1 sequence is necessary and sufficient for TGS maintenance. This active sequence encompasses a novel Conserved MOM1 Motif 2 (CMM2). The high conservation suggests that CMM2 has been the subject of strong evolutionary pressure. The replacement of Arabidopsis CMM2 by a poplar motif reveals its functional conservation. Interspecies comparison suggests that MOM1 proteins emerged at the origin of vascular plants through neo-functionalization of the ubiquitous eukaryotic CHD3 chromatin remodeling factors. Interestingly, despite the divergent evolution of CHD3 and MOM1, we observed functional cooperation in epigenetic control involving unrelated protein motifs and thus probably diverse mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000165DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2507757PMC
August 2008