Publications by authors named "Chong Ming Choo"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A single-center pilot study in Malaysia on the clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing for inborn errors of immunity.

Clin Exp Immunol 2021 Jun 1. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Primary immunodeficiency diseases refer to inborn errors of immunity (IEI) that affect the normal development and function of the immune system. The phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity of IEI have made their diagnosis challenging. Hence, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was employed in this pilot study to identify the genetic etiology of 30 pediatric patients clinically diagnosed with IEI. The potential causative variants identified by WES were validated using Sanger sequencing. Genetic diagnosis was attained in 46.7% (14 of 30) of the patients and categorized into autoinflammatory disorders (n = 3), diseases of immune dysregulation (n = 3), defects in intrinsic and innate immunity (n = 3), predominantly antibody deficiencies (n = 2), combined immunodeficiencies with associated and syndromic features (n = 2) and immunodeficiencies affecting cellular and humoral immunity (n = 1). Of the 15 genetic variants identified, two were novel variants. Genetic findings differed from the provisional clinical diagnoses in seven cases (50.0%). This study showed that WES enhances the capacity to diagnose IEI, allowing more patients to receive appropriate therapy and disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cei.13626DOI Listing
June 2021

Paediatric in-patient prescribing errors in Malaysia: a cross-sectional multicentre study.

Int J Clin Pharm 2017 Jun 17;39(3):551-559. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

Hospital Miri, Jalan Cahaya, 98000, Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia.

Background There is a lack of large comprehensive studies in developing countries on paediatric in-patient prescribing errors in different settings. Objectives To determine the characteristics of in-patient prescribing errors among paediatric patients. Setting General paediatric wards, neonatal intensive care units and paediatric intensive care units in government hospitals in Malaysia. Methods This is a cross-sectional multicentre study involving 17 participating hospitals. Drug charts were reviewed in each ward to identify the prescribing errors. All prescribing errors identified were further assessed for their potential clinical consequences, likely causes and contributing factors. Main outcome measures Incidence, types, potential clinical consequences, causes and contributing factors of the prescribing errors. Results The overall prescribing error rate was 9.2% out of 17,889 prescribed medications. There was no significant difference in the prescribing error rates between different types of hospitals or wards. The use of electronic prescribing had a higher prescribing error rate than manual prescribing (16.9 vs 8.2%, p < 0.05). Twenty eight (1.7%) prescribing errors were deemed to have serious potential clinical consequences and 2 (0.1%) were judged to be potentially fatal. Most of the errors were attributed to human factors, i.e. performance or knowledge deficit. The most common contributing factors were due to lack of supervision or of knowledge. Conclusions Although electronic prescribing may potentially improve safety, it may conversely cause prescribing errors due to suboptimal interfaces and cumbersome work processes. Junior doctors need specific training in paediatric prescribing and close supervision to reduce prescribing errors in paediatric in-patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11096-017-0463-1DOI Listing
June 2017

Echovirus 19 associated with a case of acute flaccid paralysis.

J Paediatr Child Health 2013 Mar 18;49(3):E239-42. Epub 2012 Dec 18.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia.

Acute flaccid paralysis can be caused by many members of the enterovirus genus, most notably the three poliviruses types 1 to 3. We report the case of acute flaccid paralysis caused by echovirus 19. The Western Pacific region has been declared polio free by the WHO since 2000. Australia is now using inactivated polio vaccine in the National Immunization Schedule. This vaccine does not carry the extremely rare risk of vaccine associated acute flaccid paralysis but it does leave our newly vaccinated population open gastrointestinal infection with polioviruses and the risk of circulation of the wild-type virus. Continued surveillance of cases of acute flaccid paralysis is to detect polioviruses is essential until poliovirus is completely eradicated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.12043DOI Listing
March 2013
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