Publications by authors named "Chloe McMurray"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Unexpected internal hernia in a patient with small bowel obstruction: an old surgical axiom.

BMJ Case Rep 2021 May 6;14(5). Epub 2021 May 6.

Department of General Surgery, Ayr Hospital, Ayr, UK.

An 85-year-old man with no previous laparotomies and no herniae presented with a small bowel obstruction. CT imaging did not suggest any obvious cause; however, a transition point at the terminal ileum was noted. At laparotomy, the small bowel was unexpectedly found to be obstructed through a tight anterior hiatal defect. No resection was required and the defect was closed. On retrospective review of the CT images, the herniated small bowel can clearly be seen anterior to the oesophagus and can also be appreciated as a retrocardiac air-fluid level on chest X-ray (initially felt to be a small type I hiatal hernia). Our case highlights the surgical axiom that in patients with small bowel obstruction with no scars and no herniae consideration should be given to an unusual or sinister cause.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-240784DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8103830PMC
May 2021

Complex Enterally Tube-Fed Community Patients Display Stable Tolerance, Improved Compliance and Better Achieve Energy and Protein Targets with a High-Energy, High-Protein Peptide-Based Enteral Tube Feed: Results from a Multi-Centre Pilot Study.

Nutrients 2020 Nov 18;12(11). Epub 2020 Nov 18.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow G12 0XH, UK.

This pilot study evaluated a high-energy, high-protein, peptide-based, (medium-chain triglycerides) MCT-containing enteral tube feed (Nutrison Peptisorb Plus HEHP, Nutricia Ltd., Trowbridge, BA14 0XQ, UK.) containing 1.5 kcal/mL and 7.5 g protein/100 mL. Fifteen community-based, enterally tube-fed adults (42 (SD 16.3) years) received the intervention feed daily for 28 days, with gastrointestinal tolerance, compliance and nutrient intake assessed at baseline and after the intervention period. Incidence and intensity of constipation ( = 0.496), nausea ( = 1.000), abdominal pain ( = 0.366) and bloating ( = 0.250) remained statistically unchanged, yet the incidence and intensity of diarrhoea improved significantly after receiving the intervention feed (Z = -2.271, = 0.023). Compliance with the intervention feed was significantly greater compared to the patient's baseline regimens (99% vs. 87%, = 0.038). Compared to baseline, use of the intervention feed enabled patients to significantly increase total energy (1676 kcal/day (SD 449) to 1884 kcal/day (SD 537), = 0.039) and protein intake (73 g/day (SD 17) to 89 g/day (SD 23), = 0.001), allowing patients to better achieve energy (from 88% to 99%, = 0.038) and protein (from 101% to 121%, < 0.001) requirements. This pilot study demonstrates that a high-energy, high-protein, peptide-based, MCT-containing enteral tube feed maintains gastrointestinal tolerance and improves compliance, energy and protein intake in complex, enterally tube-fed, community-based adult patients, though more work is recommended to confirm this.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12113538DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7698793PMC
November 2020