Publications by authors named "Chisa Matsuoka"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Airway basal stem cells reutilize the embryonic proliferation regulator, Tgfβ-Id2 axis, for tissue regeneration.

Dev Cell 2021 Jul 14;56(13):1917-1929.e9. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Laboratory for Lung Development and Regeneration, RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research, Kobe 650-0047, Japan. Electronic address:

During development, quiescent airway basal stem cells are derived from proliferative primordial progenitors through the cell-cycle slowdown. In contrast, basal cells contribute to adult tissue regeneration by shifting from slow cycling to proliferating and subsequently back to slow cycling. Although sustained proliferation results in tumorigenesis, the molecular mechanisms regulating these transitions remain unknown. Using temporal single-cell transcriptomics of developing murine airway progenitors and genetic validation experiments, we found that TGF-β signaling decelerated cell cycle by inhibiting Id2 and contributed to slow-cycling basal cell specification during development. In adult tissue regeneration, reduced TGF-β signaling restored Id2 expression and initiated regeneration. Id2 overexpression and Tgfbr2 knockout enhanced epithelial proliferation; however, persistent Id2 expression drove basal cell hyperplasia that resembled a precancerous state. Together, the TGF-β-Id2 axis commonly regulates the proliferation transitions in basal cells during development and regeneration, and its fine-tuning is critical for normal regeneration while avoiding basal cell hyperplasia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2021.05.016DOI Listing
July 2021

Bidirectional Wnt signaling between endoderm and mesoderm confers tracheal identity in mouse and human cells.

Nat Commun 2020 08 27;11(1):4159. Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Laboratory for Lung Development and Regeneration, Riken Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR), Kobe, 650-0047, Japan.

The periodic cartilage and smooth muscle structures in mammalian trachea are derived from tracheal mesoderm, and tracheal malformations result in serious respiratory defects in neonates. Here we show that canonical Wnt signaling in mesoderm is critical to confer trachea mesenchymal identity in human and mouse. At the initiation of tracheal development, endoderm begins to express Nkx2.1, and then mesoderm expresses the Tbx4 gene. Loss of β-catenin in fetal mouse mesoderm causes loss of Tbx4 tracheal mesoderm and tracheal cartilage agenesis. The mesenchymal Tbx4 expression relies on endodermal Wnt activation and Wnt ligand secretion but is independent of known Nkx2.1-mediated respiratory development, suggesting that bidirectional Wnt signaling between endoderm and mesoderm promotes trachea development. Activating Wnt, Bmp signaling in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) generates tracheal mesoderm containing chondrocytes and smooth muscle cells. For human ESC-derived LPM, SHH activation is required along with WNT to generate proper tracheal mesoderm. Together, these findings may contribute to developing applications for human tracheal tissue repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17969-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7453000PMC
August 2020

Epithelial Notch signaling regulates lung alveolar morphogenesis and airway epithelial integrity.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2016 07 30;113(29):8242-7. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

Laboratory for Lung Development, RIKEN Center of Developmental Biology, Kobe 650-0047, Japan;

Abnormal enlargement of the alveolar spaces is a hallmark of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Notch signaling is crucial for differentiation and regeneration and repair of the airway epithelium. However, how Notch influences the alveolar compartment and integrates this process with airway development remains little understood. Here we report a prominent role of Notch signaling in the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that lead to alveolar formation in the developing lung. We found that alveolar type II cells are major sites of Notch2 activation and show by Notch2-specific epithelial deletion (Notch2(cNull)) a unique contribution of this receptor to alveologenesis. Epithelial Notch2 was required for type II cell induction of the PDGF-A ligand and subsequent paracrine activation of PDGF receptor-α signaling in alveolar myofibroblast progenitors. Moreover, Notch2 was crucial in maintaining the integrity of the epithelial and smooth muscle layers of the distal conducting airways. Our data suggest that epithelial Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of postnatal development in the distal lung and may represent a potential target for intervention in pulmonary diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1511236113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4961178PMC
July 2016

DNA methylation restricts lineage-specific functions of transcription factor Gata4 during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

PLoS Genet 2013 Jun 27;9(6):e1003574. Epub 2013 Jun 27.

Laboratory for Mammalian Epigenetic Studies, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, Kobe, Japan.

DNA methylation changes dynamically during development and is essential for embryogenesis in mammals. However, how DNA methylation affects developmental gene expression and cell differentiation remains elusive. During embryogenesis, many key transcription factors are used repeatedly, triggering different outcomes depending on the cell type and developmental stage. Here, we report that DNA methylation modulates transcription-factor output in the context of cell differentiation. Using a drug-inducible Gata4 system and a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell model of mesoderm differentiation, we examined the cellular response to Gata4 in ES and mesoderm cells. The activation of Gata4 in ES cells is known to drive their differentiation to endoderm. We show that the differentiation of wild-type ES cells into mesoderm blocks their Gata4-induced endoderm differentiation, while mesoderm cells derived from ES cells that are deficient in the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b can retain their response to Gata4, allowing lineage conversion from mesoderm cells to endoderm. Transcriptome analysis of the cells' response to Gata4 over time revealed groups of endoderm and mesoderm developmental genes whose expression was induced by Gata4 only when DNA methylation was lost, suggesting that DNA methylation restricts the ability of these genes to respond to Gata4, rather than controlling their transcription per se. Gata4-binding-site profiles and DNA methylation analyses suggested that DNA methylation modulates the Gata4 response through diverse mechanisms. Our data indicate that epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation functions as a heritable safeguard to prevent transcription factors from activating inappropriate downstream genes, thereby contributing to the restriction of the differentiation potential of somatic cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003574DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3694845PMC
June 2013

DNA methylation is dispensable for the growth and survival of the extraembryonic lineages.

Curr Biol 2010 Aug 15;20(16):1452-7. Epub 2010 Jul 15.

Laboratory for Mammalian Epigenetic Studies, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, 2-2-3, Minatojima-minamimachi, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047, Japan.

DNA methylation regulates development and many epigenetic processes in mammals, and it is required for somatic cell growth and survival. In contrast, embryonic stem (ES) cells can self-renew without DNA methylation. It remains unclear whether any lineage-committed cells can survive without DNA-methylation machineries. Unlike in somatic cells, DNA methylation is dispensable for imprinting and X-inactivation in the extraembryonic lineages. In ES cells, DNA methylation prevents differentiation into the trophectodermal fate. Here, we created triple-knockout (TKO) mouse embryos deficient for the active DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b (TKO) by nuclear transfer (NT), and we examined their development. In chimeric TKO-NT and WT embryos, few TKO cells were found in the embryo proper, but they contributed to extraembryonic tissues. TKO ES cells showed increasing cell death during their differentiation into epiblast lineages, but not during differentiation into extraembryonic lineages. Furthermore, we successfully established trophoblastic stem cells (ntTS cells) from TKO-NT blastocysts. These TKO ntTS cells could self-renew, and they retained the fundamental gene expression patterns of stem cells. Our findings indicated that extraembryonic-lineage cells can survive and proliferate in the absence of DNA methyltransferases and that a cell's response to the stress of epigenomic damage is cell type dependent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2010.06.050DOI Listing
August 2010

Major and essential role for the DNA methylation mark in mouse embryogenesis and stable association of DNMT1 with newly replicated regions.

Mol Cell Biol 2007 Dec 24;27(23):8243-58. Epub 2007 Sep 24.

Laboratory for Mammalian Epigenetic Studies, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, 2-2-3, Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) plays an important role in the inheritance of genomic DNA methylation, which is coupled to the DNA replication process. Early embryonic lethality in DNMT1-null mutant (Dnmt1(c)) mice indicates that DNA methylation is essential for mammalian development. DNMT1, however, interacts with a number of transcriptional regulators and has a transcriptional repressor activity independent of its catalytic activity. To examine the roles of the catalytic activity of DNMT1 in vivo, we generated a Dnmt1(ps) allele that expresses a point-mutated protein that lacks catalytic activity (DNMT1-C1229S). Dnmt1(ps) mutant mice showed developmental arrest shortly after gastrulation, near-complete loss of DNA methylation, and an altered distribution of repressive chromatin markers in the nuclei; these phenotypes are quite similar to those of the Dnmt1(c) mutant. The mutant DNMT1 protein failed to associate with replication foci in Dnmt1(ps) cells. Reconstitution experiments and replication labeling in Dnmt1-/- Dnmt3a-/- Dnmt3b-/- (i.e., unmethylated) embryonic stem cells revealed that preexisting DNA methylation is a major determinant for the cell cycle-dependent localization of DNMT1. The C-terminal catalytic domain of DNMT1 inhibited its stable association with unmethylated chromatin. Our results reveal essential roles for the DNA methylation mark in mammalian development and in DNMT1 localization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.00899-07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2169176PMC
December 2007

Mitochondrial processing of bovine adrenal steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2006 Oct 7;1764(10):1561-7. Epub 2006 Sep 7.

Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihitroshima,739-8524, Japan.

Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is an important regulatory protein in steroidogenesis and rapidly undergoes proteolysis after import into the mitochondria. In this study, we determined the proteolytic cleavage sites and investigated the effects on the stimulation of steroidogenic activity of the blockage of these sites by mutation. The cleaved StAR proteins, which were purified using an anti-StAR immobilized column, reacted with antiserum against the StAR C-terminal oligopeptide. The molecular weights of the purified proteins were determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and were found to be identical to those of the 40-285 and 55-285 amino-acid-regions of the StAR protein. To confirm the identification of the cleavage sites, we constructed site-directed mutants of bovine StAR cDNA, which contained the amino acids R37A/R38A/L40A and/or R53A/R54A/R55A. These mutant StAR proteins expressed in COS-1 cells were not cleaved at positions 39-40 and 54-55, and were processed at sites different from those in the wild-type StAR protein. These mutant proteins stimulated pregnenolone formation at almost the same rate as the wild-type StAR protein in COS-1 cells, which suggests that the cholesterol transfer activity was not affected by the mutation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbapap.2006.08.016DOI Listing
October 2006

Maintenance of self-renewal ability of mouse embryonic stem cells in the absence of DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b.

Genes Cells 2006 Jul;11(7):805-14

Laboratory for Mammalian Epigenetic Studies, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, 2-2-3 Minatojima-Minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b cooperatively regulate cytosine methylation in CpG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes, providing an epigenetic basis for gene silencing and maintenance of genome integrity. Proper CpG methylation is required for the normal growth of various somatic cell types, indicating its essential role in the basic cellular function of mammalian cells. Previous studies using Dnmt1(-/-) or Dnmt3a(-/-)Dnmt3b(-/-) ES cells, however, have shown that undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells can tolerate hypomethylation for their proliferation. In an attempt to investigate the effects of the complete loss of CpG DNA methyltransferase function, we established mouse ES cells lacking all three of these enzymes by gene targeting. Despite the absence of CpG methylation, as demonstrated by genome-wide methylation analysis, these triple knockout (TKO) ES cells grew robustly and maintained their undifferentiated characteristics. TKO ES cells retained pericentromeric heterochromatin domains marked with methylation at Lys9 of histone H3 and heterochromatin protein-1, and maintained their normal chromosome numbers. Our results indicate that ES cells can maintain stem cell properties and chromosomal stability in the absence of CpG methylation and CpG DNA methyltransferases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2443.2006.00984.xDOI Listing
July 2006
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