Publications by authors named "Chin-Soo Kim"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The evaluation of a scoring system in airway management after oral cancer surgery.

Maxillofac Plast Reconstr Surg 2015 Dec 29;37(1):19. Epub 2015 Jul 29.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, 2175 Dalgubeoldae-ro, Daegu, 700-705 South Korea.

Background: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the usefulness of tracheostomy scoring system in the decision of postoperative airway management in oral cancer patients.

Materials And Methods: A total of 104 patients were reviewed in this retrospective study, who underwent radical resection with or without neck dissection and free flap reconstruction due to oral cancer. The patients were classified into three groups according to the timing of the extubation; extubated groups (n = 51), overnight intubation group (n = 45), and tracheostomy group (n = 8). Cameron's score was used to evaluate the relation between the state of the patient's airway and the type of the operation.

Results: Tracheostomy was performed in eight patients (8/104, 7.7 %). A total of 22 patients (21.2 %) had more than 5 points of which 17 patients (77.3 %) did not have a tracheostomy and any postoperative emergency airway problems. The tracheostomy scores were significantly different among the three groups. Hospital stay showed a significant correlation with the tracheostomy score.

Conclusions: The scoring system did not quite agree with the airway management of the authors' clinic; however, it can be one of the clinical factors predicting the degree of the postoperative airway obstruction and surgical aggressiveness for recovery. The further studies are needed for clinically more reliable scoring systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40902-015-0021-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4518133PMC
December 2015

Stability of mandibular setback surgery with and without presurgical orthodontics.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2014 Apr 2;72(4):779-87. Epub 2013 Oct 2.

Professor, Center for Orthognathic Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare stability after mandibular setback surgery in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion with and without presurgical orthodontics.

Materials And Methods: This retrospective cohort study included consecutive patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion who underwent only mandibular surgery. Patients treated with the surgery-first approach without presurgical orthodontics (SF group) were compared with a control group (conventional surgery with presurgical orthodontics; CS group) using lateral cephalograms taken preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at the time of debonding. Predictor variables (group and timing), outcome variables (cephalometric measurements over time), and other variables, such as baseline characteristics, were evaluated to determine the difference in stability of mandibular positions such as the B point.

Results: Sixty-one patients were enrolled in this study (CS group, n = 38; SF group, n = 23). Baseline demographic variables were similar in the 2 groups except for orthodontic treatment period. The mean setback of the mandible at the B point was similar (CS group, 8.7 mm; SF group, 9.1 mm; difference, P > .05), but the horizontal relapse in the SF group (2.4 mm) was significantly greater than in the CS group (1.6 mm; P < .05). Patients with a horizontal relapse greater than 3 mm comprised 39.1% of the SF group compared with 15.8% of the CS group (P < .05).

Conclusion: Mandibular sagittal split ramus osteotomy without presurgical orthodontic treatment was less stable than conventional orthognathic surgery for mandibular prognathism. Before performing a surgery-first approach, skeletal stability needs to be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2013.09.033DOI Listing
April 2014

Expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in human dental pulp.

J Endod 2012 Aug 8;38(8):1087-92. Epub 2012 Jun 8.

Department of Oral Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.

Introduction: Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is activated by noxious cold (<17°C) and contributes to cold and mechanical hypersensitivity after inflammation and nerve injury.

Methods: To investigate whether TRPA1 is involved in the mediation of nociception, including noxious cold and cold hypersensitivity in teeth, we examined the expression of TRPA1 and sodium channel Nav1.8 in human dental pulp using fluorescent and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry.

Results: TRPA1 was expressed in a large number of axons branching extensively in the peripheral pulp and in a few axons within the nerve bundles in the core of the coronal pulp and in the radicular pulp. Under electron microscopy, TRPA1 immunoreactivity was typically localized near the plasma membrane of unmyelinated axons in the peripheral pulp, suggesting that in these axons it may act as a functional receptor. The proportion of axons expressing TRPA1 in neurofilament 200-positive axons significantly increased in the painful pulp compared with the normal pulp. TRPA1 was also densely expressed in the processes and the cell body of odontoblasts. A large number of axons coexpressed TRPA1 and Nav1.8.

Conclusions: These findings support the notion that TRPA1 is involved in the perception of noxious cold and cold hypersensitivity in human dental pulp and that TRPA1-mediated nociception is primarily mediated by axons and odontoblasts in the peripheral pulp.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2012.04.024DOI Listing
August 2012

Study of an experimental microthreaded scalloped implant design: proximal bone healing at different interimplant distances in a canine model.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2010 Jul-Aug;25(4):681-9

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Jung Gu, Daegu, Korea.

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity of a new experimental microthreaded scalloped (MTS) implant design in comparison to a conventional flat-top (FT) implant by measuring the proximal bone loss at different interimplant distances in a canine model.

Materials And Methods: MTS implants were placed in one side of the posterior mandible and conventional flat-top (FT) implants were placed in the other side of the mandible in 10 beagle dogs. In five dogs, four each of the MTS and FT implants were placed with an interimplant distance of 2 mm. In another five dogs, three each of the MTS and FT implants were placed at an interimplant distance of 5 mm. All 70 implants (35 MTS and 35 FT implants) were placed in a nonsubmerged (one-stage) manner. The animals were sacrificed 4 months after implant placement, and the crestal bone levels around the MTS and FT implants were measured and compared on radiographs and histologic sections.

Results: The experimental MTS implants showed significantly less crestal bone loss (0.81 ± 0.34 mm) than the FT implants (1.60 ± 0.42 mm) on radiographs (P < .001). Histologic measurement also demonstrated that there was significantly less (P < .001) marginal bone loss around the MTS implants (0.74 ± 0.41 mm) than around the FT implants (1.53 ± 0.52 mm). There was no statistically significant difference in bone loss between the 2-mm and 5-mm interimplant distances for either MTS or FT implants (P > .05).

Conclusion: The experimental MTS implant was more effective in preserving the proximal bone than the conventional FT external-hex implant with the same surface. In this canine model, placement of the implants at either a 2-mm and or a 5-mm interimplant distance did not result in significant differences in marginal bone loss for both MTS and FT implants. This experiment demonstrated a potential benefit of the microthread design on a scalloped implant.
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November 2010

Aspirin induces apoptosis in YD-8 human oral squamous carcinoma cells through activation of caspases, down-regulation of Mcl-1, and inactivation of ERK-1/2 and AKT.

Toxicol In Vitro 2010 Apr 29;24(3):713-20. Epub 2010 Jan 29.

Department of Dentistry, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-dong, Jung-gu, Daegu 700-712, Republic of Korea.

NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors show anti-cancer activities in many cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs (aspirin or indomethacin) and COX-2 inhibitor (NS-398) on growth of YD-8 human oral squamous carcinoma cells. Interestingly, among drugs tested, aspirin showed strongest inhibitory effects on viability and survival of YD-8 cells. Profoundly, aspirin treatment resulted in severe cell shrinkage and nuclear DNA fragmentation in YD-8 cells, suggesting the aspirin-induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells. Data of Western blot further demonstrated that aspirin treatment caused activation of caspases, down-regulation of Mcl-1 protein, dephosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and AKT, and also IkappaB-alpha proteolysis-dependent NF-kappaB activation in YD-8 cells. Aspirin, however, had no effect on expressions of Bcl-2, XIAP, and HIAP-1 in YD-8 cells. Importantly, pretreatment with z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor blocked the aspirin-induced apoptosis and Mcl-1 down-regulation in YD-8 cells. These findings collectively suggest that aspirin induces apoptosis in YD-8 cells and the induction may be correlated to activation of caspases, caspase-dependent Mcl-1 proteolysis, inactivation of ERK-1/2 and AKT, and activation of NF-kappaB. It is suggested that aspirin may be applied a potential anti-cancer drug against human oral squamous carcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2010.01.010DOI Listing
April 2010