Publications by authors named "Chiara Veredice"

10 Publications

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A novel homozygous variant in JAM3 gene causing hemorrhagic destruction of the brain, subependymal calcification, and congenital cataracts (HDBSCC) with neonatal onset.

Neurol Sci 2021 Jul 22. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy.

Background: JAM3 gene, located on human chromosome 11q25, encodes a member of the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) family. Mutations of this gene are associated with hemorrhagic destruction of the brain, subependymal calcification, and congenital cataracts (HDBSCC).

Case Report: Herein, we present a newborn male with a prenatal suspicion of bilateral cataracts but without fetal ultrasound findings of cortical malformations. He was postnatally diagnosed with a clinical picture of HDBSCC and Early-onset Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathy (DEE), associated to a homozygous variant of JAM3 gene.

Conclusion: Identification of this variant in affected individuals has implications for perinatal and postnatal management and genetic counseling. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported of a child with a JAM3 variant in Italy, from a different ethnic background than the other reported children until now (Saudi Arabian, Turkish, Afghani, and Moroccan origin). JAM3 screening could be requested in prenatal diagnosis of fetal congenital cataracts and included in Next-Generation DNA Sequencing panels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-021-05480-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8295029PMC
July 2021

Adult phenotype in Koolen-de Vries/ haploinsufficiency syndrome.

J Med Genet 2020 Dec 24. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Dipartimento Universitario Scienze della Vita e Sanità Pubblica, Sezione di Medicina Genomica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Roma, Italy

Background: Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS) is a multisystem neurodevelopmental disorder caused by 17q21.31 deletions or mutations in . It was mainly described in children.

Methods: A retrospective study on 9 subjects aged 19-45 years and revision of 18 literature patients, with the purpose to get insights into the phenotypic evolution with time, and into the clinical manifestations in adulthood.

Results: Seven patients had a 17q21.31 deletion and two a point mutation in . All had intellectual disability, which was mild in five (56%) and moderate in four (44%). Epilepsy was diagnosed in four subjects (44%), with onset from 1 to 7 years and full remission before 9 years in 3/4 patients. Scoliosis affected seven individuals (77.7%) and it was substantially stable with age in 5/7 patients, allowing for simple daily activities. Two subjects had severely progressive scoliosis, which was surgically corrected. Overweight or true obesity did occur after puberty in six patients (67%). Behaviour abnormalities were recorded in six patients (67%). The facial phenotype slightly evolved with time to include thick eyebrows, elongated nose and pronounced pointed chin. Despite behaviour abnormalities, happy disposition and sociable attitudes were common. Half of patients had fluent language and were good at writing and reading. Rich language, although limited to single words or short sentences, and very limited or absent skills in writing and reading were observed in the remaining patients. Autonomy in daily activities and personal care was usually limited.

Conclusions: Distinctive features in adult KdVS subjects include intellectual disability, overweight/obesity, behaviour abnormalities with preserved social interest, ability in language, slight worsening of the facial phenotype and no seizures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107225DOI Listing
December 2020

Heterozygous variants underlie a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

J Med Genet 2021 Jul 31;58(7):475-483. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Unit of Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, Department of Neuroscience and Neurorehabilitation, IRCCS Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Roma, Italy.

Background: Dominant and recessive variants in the gene on chromosome 2q37.3 are associated with several phenotypes, although only three syndromes are currently listed in the OMIM classification: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 and spastic paraplegia type 30, both recessively inherited, and mental retardation type 9 with dominant inheritance.

Methods: In this retrospective multicentre study, we describe the clinical, neuroradiological and genetic features of 19 Caucasian patients (aged 3-65 years) harbouring heterozygous variants, and extensively review the available literature to improve current classification of -related disorders.

Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 comprised patients with a complex phenotype with prominent pyramidal signs, variably associated in all but one case with additional features (ie, epilepsy, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, optic nerve atrophy); conversely, patients in group 2 presented an early onset or congenital ataxic phenotype. Fourteen different heterozygous missense variants were detected by next-generation sequencing screening, including three novel variants, most falling within the kinesin motor domain.

Conclusion: The present study further enlarges the clinical and mutational spectrum of -related disorders by describing a large series of patients with dominantly inherited pathogenic variants ranging from pure to complex forms of hereditary spastic paraparesis/paraplegias (HSP) and ataxic phenotypes in a lower proportion of cases. A comprehensive review of the literature indicates that screening should be implemented in HSP regardless of its mode of inheritance or presentations as well as in other complex neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disorders showing congenital or early onset ataxia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107007DOI Listing
July 2021

Clinical features and genetic analysis of two siblings with startle disease in an Italian family: a case report.

BMC Med Genet 2019 03 12;20(1):40. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli" IRCCS, Rome, Italy.

Background: Hyperekplexia also known as Startle disease is a rare neuromotor hereditary disorder characterized by exaggerated startle responses to unexpected auditory, tactile, and visual stimuli and generalized muscle stiffness, which both gradually subside during the first months of life. Although the diagnosis of Hyperekplexia is based on clinical findings, pathogenic variants in five genes have been reported to cause Hyperekplexia, of which GLRA1 accounts for about 80% of cases. Dominant and recessive mutations have been identified in GLRA1 gene as pathogenic variants in many individuals with the familial form of Hyperekplexia and occasionally in simplex cases.

Case Presentation: In the present study, we describe clinical and genetic features of two Italian siblings, one with the major and one with the minor form of the disease. DNA samples from the probands and their parents were performed by NGS approach and validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of the GLRA1 gene revealed, in both probands, compound heterozygous mutations: c.895C > T or p.R299X inherited from the mother and c.587C > A or p.D98E inherited from the father.

Conclusions: Until now, these two identified mutations in GLRA1 have not been reported before as compound mutations. What clearly emerges within our study is the clinical heterogeneity in the same family. In fact, even though in the same pedigree, the affected mother showed only mild startle responses to unexpected noise stimuli, which might be explained by variable expressivity, while the father, showed no clear signs of symptomatology, which might be explained by non-penetrance. Finally, the two brothers have different form of the disease, even if the compound heterozygous mutations in GLRA1 are the same, showing that the same mutation in GLRA1 could have different phenotypic expressions and suggesting an underling mechanism of variable expressivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12881-019-0779-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417078PMC
March 2019

Early development in Dravet syndrome; visual function impairment precedes cognitive decline.

Epilepsy Res 2011 Jan 24;93(1):73-9. Epub 2010 Nov 24.

Catholic University, Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Rome, Italy.

Aim of the study was to describe prospectively the early neuropsychological evolution including the first pre-cognitive stages of the Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy in Infancy (SMEI) or Dravet syndrome. Five cases, four of whom since before a diagnostic evidence of the Dravet syndrome, were followed up. Full clinical assessment including developmental, visual function and behaviour assessments were serially performed. In four cases, a variable onset age of cognitive decline assessed with developmental scales was preceded some months before by an impairment of visual function; the remaining patient during all the course of follow-up till 51 months of age showed a normal development without visual impairment. A cognitive decline with variable onset was generally confirmed in Dravet syndrome. The previous early impairment of visual function seems to herald the cognitive decline and provides useful prognostic information; furthermore, it possibly suggests some clues for a better understanding of the mechanisms of cognitive deterioration in this syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2010.10.015DOI Listing
January 2011

Early onset myoclonic epilepsy and 15q26 microdeletion: observation of the first case.

Epilepsia 2009 Jul 19;50(7):1810-5. Epub 2009 Apr 19.

Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Catholic University, Rome, Italy.

The authors report the study of a 30-month-old girl with refractory myoclonic epilepsy associated with mental retardation, growth delay, peculiar facial appearance, and minor physical anomalies. Extensive genetic studies were performed, including an array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) that showed a cryptic interstitial deletion of 15q (5 Mb) affecting the 15q26.1-26.2 region. Partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 15, including the 15q26 region, were observed in syndromic associations that typically include congenital diaphragmatic hernia, but neurologic features were poorly described and epileptic seizures were never reported. Our findings suggest that genes for seizures could be included in the 15q26.1q26.2 deletion interval.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02078.xDOI Listing
July 2009

Visual development in infants with prenatal post-haemorrhagic ventricular dilatation.

Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2007 Jul 1;92(4):F255-8. Epub 2006 Dec 1.

Pediatric Neurology Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess visual function in 13 infants with evidence of prenatal post haemorrhagic ventricular dilatation.

Design: Infants were assessed at 5, 12 and 24 months using a battery of tests specifically designed to assess various aspects of visual function in infancy. Visual findings were correlated with several variables, including extent of the lesion and presence of epilepsy.

Results And Conclusions: Abnormalities of visual function were frequent (over 60%) in our cohort at age 2 years, ranging from isolated abnormal ocular movements to severe abnormalities of all the aspects of visual function assessed. The most severe and persistent abnormalities of visual function were found in infants with grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage and shunted hydrocephalus who also had epilepsy in the first year.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/adc.2006.101485DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2675421PMC
July 2007

Early thalamic injury associated with epilepsy and continuous spike-wave during slow sleep.

Epilepsia 2005 Jun;46(6):889-900

Department of Medical and Surgical Pediatrics and Developmental Neurosciences, Catholic University, Rome, Italy.

Purpose: Mechanisms inducing continuous spike-wave during slow sleep (CSWS) in encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep are still unclear. Recently, some sporadic cases with early thalamic injury associated with CSWS have been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate in a population of patients with an early thalamic injury the presence of an activation of paroxysmal activities during sleep, their characteristics, and possible relations to neuroimaging and neuropsychological features.

Methods: Thirty-two patients with prenatal or perinatal thalamic injuries, mostly due to a vascular mechanisms, were fully examined, including neuroimaging, EEG monitoring, and cognitive follow-up.

Results And Conclusions: Twenty-nine of 32 patients showed major sleep EEG activation. Among these 29 patients, two different groups were distinguished: the first included the more or less typical CSWS (12 cases), generally with symmetry of spike and waves (SWs) and often with no spindle at all. The other cases had an usual asymmetry of SWs and presence or reduction of spindles, plus other atypical features concerning synchronism and morphology of SWs. Behavioral disorders were significantly more present in patients with a true CSWS; their improvement (and in one case of the three thoroughly followed the improvement of cognitive competence) paralleled the disappearance of CSWS. The generally predominant injury of the lateral aspect of the thalamus included reticular nucleus and ventral nuclei. An imbalance of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B)--versus GABA(A)--mediated receptors may be evoked as a cofactor predisposing to CSWS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2005.64504.xDOI Listing
June 2005

Epilepsy in shunted posthemorrhagic infantile hydrocephalus owing to pre- or perinatal intra- or periventricular hemorrhage.

J Child Neurol 2005 Mar;20(3):219-25

Department of Medical and Surgical Pediatrics and Developmental Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy.

Epilepsy is relatively common in infants with hydrocephalus. Its mechanism is controversial; in fact, studies on etiologically heterogeneous series are not able to clarify the mechanism generating epilepsy or to suggest effective prevention and treatment strategies. Our study is aimed at assessing the onset and evolution of epilepsy, as well as concurrent cognitive development of a homogeneous series of shunted posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus owing to pre- or perinatal intra- or periventricular hemorrhage. Forty patients were enrolled in the study. Twenty-six were patients with grade II-III intraventricular hemorrhage, 16 of whom had associated ischemic lesions. In the remaining 14 patients, a grade IV intra-ventricular hemorrhage was found. Epilepsy was observed in 27 patients. Aside from 10 cases with nonsyndromic forms of epilepsy, it was possible to define at least three different age-dependent epileptic syndromes: symptomatic neonatal location-related epilepsy with transient West's syndrome in infancy in 5 patients; West's syndrome in 8 patients; and continuous spike-waves during sleep in 4 patients. Epilepsy was significantly correlated with ischemic lesions only. Early thalamic injuries frequently evolved toward continuous spike-waves during sleep, indicating that patients with thalamic injury must be monitored to detect continuous spike-waves during sleep early. Cerebellar atrophy, in addition to epilepsy and other brain injuries, accounted for disorders of cognitive development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/08830738050200030901DOI Listing
March 2005
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