Publications by authors named "Chiara Mutinelli"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Antimanic Efficacy of a Novel Kv3 Potassium Channel Modulator.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2018 Jan 31;43(2):435-444. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 voltage-gated potassium channels are expressed on parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in corticolimbic brain regions and contribute to high-frequency neural firing. The channels are also expressed on GABAergic neurons of the basal ganglia, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area (VTA) where they regulate firing patterns critical for movement control, reward, and motivation. Modulation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels may therefore have potential in the treatment of disorders in which these systems have been implicated, such as bipolar disorder. Following the recent development of a potassium channel modulator, AUT1-an imidazolidinedione compound that specifically increases currents mediated by Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels in recombinant systems-we report that the compound is able to reverse 'manic-like' behavior in two mouse models: amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and ClockΔ19 mutants. AUT1 completely prevented amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner, similar to the atypical antipsychotic, clozapine. Similar efficacy was observed in Kv3.2 knockout mice. In contrast, AUT1 was unable to prevent amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in mice lacking Kv3.1 channels. Notably, Kv3.1-null mice displayed baseline hyperlocomotion, reduced anxiety-like behavior, and antidepressant-like behavior. In ClockΔ19 mice, AUT1 reversed hyperactivity. Furthermore, AUT1 application modulated firing frequency and action potential properties of ClockΔ19 VTA dopamine neurons potentially through network effects. Kv3.1 protein levels in the VTA of ClockΔ19 and WT mice were unaltered by acute AUT1 treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the modulation of Kv3.1 channels may provide a novel approach to the treatment of bipolar mania.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5729564PMC
January 2018

A Novel Modulator of Kv3 Potassium Channels Regulates the Firing of Parvalbumin-Positive Cortical Interneurons.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2015 Sep 17;354(3):251-60. Epub 2015 Jun 17.

Autifony s.r.l., Verona, Italy (M.D.R.-S., G.A.); Aptuit s.r.l., Verona, Italy (E.Z., C.M., N.G., R.B., L.A., C.V.); Medicines Research Centre, GlaxoSmithKline S.p.A., Verona, Italy (F.G.); and Autifony Therapeutics Limited, Imperial College Incubator, London, United Kingdom (C.H.L.)

Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 high voltage-activated potassium channels, which display fast activation and deactivation kinetics, are known to make a crucial contribution to the fast-spiking phenotype of certain neurons. Pharmacological experiments show that the blockade of native Kv3 currents with low concentrations of tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine impairs the expression of this firing phenotype. In particular, Kv3 channels are highly expressed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive interneurons in corticolimbic brain circuits, which modulate the synchronization of cortical circuits and the generation of brain rhythms. Here, we describe a novel small molecule, (5R)-5-ethyl-3-(6-{[4-methyl-3-(methyloxy)phenyl]oxy}-3-pyridinyl)-2,4-imidazolidinedione (AUT1), which modulates Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels in human recombinant and rodent native neurons. AUT1 increased whole currents mediated by human Kv3.1b and Kv3.2a channels, with a concomitant leftward shift in the voltage dependence of activation. A less potent effect was observed on hKv3.3 currents. In mouse somatosensory cortex slices in vitro, AUT1 rescued the fast-spiking phenotype of parvalbumin-positive-fast-spiking interneurons following an impairment of their firing capacity by blocking a proportion of Kv3 channels with a low concentration of tetraethylammonium. Notably, AUT1 had no effect on interneuron firing when applied alone. Together, these data confirm the role played by Kv3 channels in the regulation of the firing phenotype of somatosensory interneurons and suggest that AUT1 and other Kv3 modulators could represent a new and promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of disorders associated with dysfunction of inhibitory feedback in corticolimbic circuits, such as schizophrenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.115.225748DOI Listing
September 2015

Evaluation of expression and function of the H+/myo-inositol transporter HMIT.

BMC Cell Biol 2009 Jul 16;10:54. Epub 2009 Jul 16.

Psychiatry Discovery Technology Group, GlaxoSmithKline, New Frontiers Science Park, Harlow, UK.

Background: The phosphoinositide (PIns) signalling pathway regulates a series of neuronal processes, such as neurotransmitter release, that are thought to be altered in mood disorders. Furthermore, mood-stabilising drugs have been shown to inhibit key enzymes that regulate PIns production and alter neuronal growth cone morphology in an inositol-reversible manner. Here, we describe analyses of expression and function of the recently identified H+/myo-inositol transporter (HMIT) investigated as a potential regulator of PIns signalling.

Results: We show that HMIT is primarily a neuronal transporter widely expressed in the rat and human brain, with particularly high levels in the hippocampus and cortex, as shown by immunohistochemistry. The transporter is localised at the Golgi apparatus in primary cultured neurones. No HMIT-mediated electrophysiological responses were detected in rat brain neurones or slices; in addition, inositol transport and homeostasis were unaffected in HMIT targeted null-mutant mice.

Conclusion: Together, these data do not support a role for HMIT as a neuronal plasma membrane inositol transporter, as previously proposed. However, we observed that HMIT can transport inositol triphosphate, indicating unanticipated intracellular functions for this transporter that may be relevant to mood control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2121-10-54DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2717050PMC
July 2009

The kinase activity of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 with activation loop mutations affects receptor trafficking and signaling.

J Biol Chem 2004 Oct 2;279(41):43254-60. Epub 2004 Aug 2.

Division of Biochemistry, Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Verona Medical School, 37134 Verona, Italy.

Amino acid substitutions at the Lys-650 codon within the activation loop kinase domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) result in graded constitutive phosphorylation of the receptor. Accordingly, the Lys-650 mutants are associated with dwarfisms with graded clinical severity. To assess the importance of the phosphorylation level on FGFR3 maturation along the secretory pathway, hemagglutinin A-tagged derivatives were studied. The highly activated SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans) mutant accumulates in its immature and phosphorylated form in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which fails to be degraded. Furthermore, the Janus kinase (Jak)/STAT pathway is activated from the ER by direct recruitment of Jak1. Abolishing the autocatalytic property of the mutated FGFR3 by replacing the critical Tyr-718 reestablishes the receptor full maturation and inhibits signaling. Differently, the low activated hypochondroplasia mutant is present as a mature phosphorylated form on the plasma membrane, although with a delayed transition in the ER, and is completely processed. Signaling does not occur in the presence of brefeldin A; instead, STAT1 is activated when protein secretion is blocked with monensin, suggesting that the hypochondroplasia receptor signals at the exit from the ER. Our results suggest that kinase activity affects FGFR3 trafficking and determines the spatial segregation of signaling pathways. Consequently, the defect in down-regulation of the highly activated receptors results in the increased signaling capacity from the intracellular compartments, and this may determine the severity of the diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M405247200DOI Listing
October 2004