Publications by authors named "Chiara Cerra"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison between Cerebroplacental Ratio and Umbilicocerebral Ratio in Predicting Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Pregnancies Complicated by Late Fetal Growth Restriction: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study.

Fetal Diagn Ther 2021 06 15:1-9. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Center for High Risk Pregnancy and Fetal Care, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy.

Introduction: The role of cerebroplacental ratio (CPR) or umbilicocerebral ratio (UCR) to predict adverse intrapartum and perinatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by late fetal growth restriction (FGR) remains controversial.

Methods: This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study involving 5 referral centers in Italy and Spain, including singleton pregnancies complicated by late FGR, as defined by Delphi consensus criteria, with a scan 1 week prior to delivery. The primary objective was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the CPR and UCR for the prediction of a composite adverse outcome, defined as the presence of either an adverse intrapartum outcome (need for operative delivery/cesarean section for suspected fetal distress) or an adverse perinatal outcome (intrauterine death, Apgar score <7 at 5 min, arterial pH <7.1, base excess of >-11 mEq/mL, or neonatal intensive care unit admission).

Results: Median CPR absolute values (1.11 vs. 1.22, p = 0.018) and centiles (3 vs. 4, p = 0.028) were lower in pregnancies with a composite adverse outcome than in those without it. Median UCR absolute values (0.89 vs. 0.82, p = 0.018) and centiles (97 vs. 96, p = 0.028) were higher. However, the area under the curve, 95% confidence interval for predicting the composite adverse outcome showed a poor predictive value: 0.580 (0.512-0.646) for the raw absolute values of CPR and UCR, and 0.575 (0.507-0.642) for CPR and UCR centiles adjusted for gestational age. The use of dichotomized values (CPR <1, UCR >1 or CPR <5th centile, UCR >95th centile) did not improve the diagnostic accuracy.

Conclusion: The CPR and UCR measured in the week prior delivery are of low predictive value to assess adverse intrapartum and perinatal outcomes in pregnancies with late FGR.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000516443DOI Listing
June 2021

Diagnostic performance of cerebroplacental and umbilicocerebral ratio in appropriate for gestational age and late growth restricted fetuses attempting vaginal delivery: a multicenter, retrospective study.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2021 Jun 8:1-7. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Fetal Medicine Unit, Maternal and Child Health and Development Network, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Background: Cerebroplacental Doppler studies have been advocated to predict the risk of adverse perinatal outcome (APO) irrespective of fetal weight.

Objective: To report the diagnostic performance of cerebroplacental (CPR) and umbilicocerebral (UCR) ratios in predicting APO in appropriate for gestational age (AGA) fetuses and in those affected by late fetal growth restriction (FGR) attempting vaginal delivery.

Study Design: Multicenter, retrospective, nested case-control study between 1 January 2017 and January 2020 involving five referral centers in Italy and Spain. Singleton gestations with a scan between 36 and 40 weeks and within two weeks of attempting vaginal delivery were included. Fetal arterial Doppler and biometry were collected. The AGA group was defined as fetuses with an estimated fetal weight and abdominal circumference >10th and <90th percentile, while the late FGR group was defined by Delphi consensus criteria. The primary outcome was the prediction of a composite of perinatal adverse outcomes including either intrauterine death, Apgar score at 5 min <7, abnormal acid-base status (umbilical artery pH < 7.1 or base excess of more than -11) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis was performed.

Results: 646 pregnancies (317 in the AGA group and 329 in the late FGR group) were included. APO were present in 12.6% AGA and 24.3% late FGR pregnancies, with an odds ratio of 2.22 (95% CI 1.46-3.37). The performance of CPR and UCR for predicting APO was poor in both AGA [AUC: 0.44 (0.39-0.51)] and late FGR fetuses [AUC: 0.56 (0.49-0.61)].

Conclusions: CPR and UCR on their own are poor prognostic predictors of APO irrespective of fetal weight.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2021.1926977DOI Listing
June 2021

Maternal outcomes of cesarean delivery performed at early gestational ages: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM 2021 Mar 22;3(4):100360. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Center for High-Risk Pregnancy and Fetal Care, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy. Electronic address:

Objective: This study aimed to report maternal outcomes of preterm (<34 weeks of gestation) cesarean delivery.

Data Sources: Medline, Embase, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched electronically on September 1, 2020, utilizing combinations of the relevant medical subject heading terms, key words, and word variants for "cesarean delivery" and "outcome."

Study Eligibility Criteria: We included only studies reporting maternal outcomes of cesarean delivery performed at <34 weeks of gestation.

Study Appraisal And Synthesis Methods: The primary outcome was a composite score of maternal surgical morbidity including maternal death, severe intrasurgical or postpartum hemorrhage, hysterectomy, need for blood transfusion, and damage to adjacent organs. Secondary outcomes were individual components of the primary outcome, need for reoperation, postsurgical infection, thromboembolism, and hysterectomy. We also performed 2 subgroup analyses considering cesarean delivery performed at <28 and <26 weeks of gestation. Meta-analyses of proportions using random effects model were used to combine data.

Results: A total of 15 studies involving 8378 women undergoing cesarean delivery at <34 weeks of gestation were included in the systematic review. Composite adverse maternal outcome was reported in 16.2% of women (95% confidence interval, 15.4-17.0) undergoing a cesarean delivery before 34 weeks of gestation. Hemorrhage, either intra- or postoperative, was observed in 6.9% of cases (95% confidence interval, 6.4-7.5), whereas 6.3% (95% confidence interval, 4.2-8.7) required blood transfusion. Damage to adjacent organs complicated the primary surgery in 2.0% of women (95% confidence interval, 0.1-6.4), whereas 1.2% (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.4) required a reoperation after cesarean delivery. Maternal death occurred in 0.1% (95% confidence interval, 0.0-1.4). In women undergoing cesarean delivery at <28 weeks of gestation, composite adverse maternal outcome complicated 22.9% of cases (95% confidence interval, 16.7-33.8) and 14.0% (95% confidence interval, 5.8-24.9) experienced hemorrhage whereas 7.7% (95% confidence interval, 4.4-11.8) required blood transfusion. Finally, when considering women undergoing cesarean delivery at <26 weeks of gestation, composite adverse maternal outcome was reported in 24.8% (95% confidence interval, 10.1-43.4), whereas the corresponding figures for hemorrhage and need for blood transfusion were 9.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.7-21.6) and 6.1% (95% confidence interval, 0.3-10.0), respectively.

Conclusion: Early cesarean delivery is affected by a high rate of maternal intra- and postoperative complications. The findings from systematic review can help clinicians in counseling parents when cesarean delivery is required in an early gestational age.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajogmf.2021.100360DOI Listing
March 2021

Maternal and perinatal outcomes in high compared to low risk pregnancies complicated by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection (phase 2): the World Association of Perinatal Medicine working group on coronavirus disease 2019.

Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM 2021 02 20;3(4):100329. Epub 2021 Feb 20.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Centre for High-Risk Pregnancy and Fetal Care, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy (Dr Liberati, Dr Sebastiano, Dr Oronzi, Dr Cerra, and Dr Buca).

Background: It has still to be ascertained whether severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in pregnancy is associated with worse maternal and fetal outcomes compared to low risk gestations.

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate maternal and perinatal outcomes in high- and low-risk pregnancies complicated by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection.

Study Design: This was a multinational retrospective cohort study involving women with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection from 76 centers from 25 countries in Europe, the United States, South America, Asia, and Australia from April 4, 2020, to October 28, 2020. The primary outcome was a composite measure of maternal mortality and morbidity, including admission to the intensive care unit, use of mechanical ventilation, or death. The secondary outcome was a composite measure of adverse perinatal outcome, including miscarriage, fetal loss, neonatal and perinatal death, and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. All outcomes were assessed in high- and low-risk pregnancies. Pregnancies were considered high risk in case of either preexisting chronic medical conditions in pregnancy or obstetrical disorders occurring in pregnancy. The Fisher exact test and logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data.

Results: A total of 887 singleton pregnancies who tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of nasal and pharyngeal swab specimens were included in the study. The risk of composite adverse maternal outcomes was higher in high-risk pregnancies than in low-risk pregnancies (odds ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.24; P=.035). In addition, women carrying high-risk pregnancies were at higher risk of hospital admission (odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.04; P=.002), presence of severe respiratory symptoms (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-3.21; P=.001), admission to the intensive care unit (odds ratio, 2.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-4.88), and invasive mechanical ventilation (odds ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-5.94; P=.002). When exploring perinatal outcomes, high-risk pregnancies were at high risk of adverse perinatal outcomes (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-2.72; P=.009). However, such association was mainly because of the higher incidence of miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies compared with that in low-risk pregnancies (5.3% vs 1.6%, P=.008); furthermore, there was no difference in other explored outcomes between the 2 study groups. At logistic regression analysis, maternal age (odds ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.22; P=.023) and high-risk pregnancy (odds ratio, 4.21; 95% confidence interval, 3.90-5.11; P<.001) were independently associated with adverse maternal outcomes.

Conclusion: High-risk pregnancies complicated by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection were at higher risk of adverse maternal outcomes than low-risk pregnancies complicated by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajogmf.2021.100329DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7896113PMC
February 2021
-->