Publications by authors named "Chiara Ceolin"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Adult-Onset Asymmetrical Lipomatosis: Thigh Girdle Lipomatosis.

Obes Surg 2021 Apr 20;31(4):1852-1854. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padua, Via Giustiniani 2, 35128, Padua, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-020-05116-9DOI Listing
April 2021

Molecular Evolution and Phylogeography of Co-circulating IHNV and VHSV in Italy.

Front Microbiol 2016 23;7:1306. Epub 2016 Aug 23.

Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie Padova, Italy.

Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) are the most important viral pathogens impacting rainbow trout farming. These viruses are persistent in Italy, where they are responsible for severe disease outbreaks (epizootics) that affect the profitability of the trout industry. Despite the importance of IHNV and VHSV, little is known about their evolution at a local scale, although this is likely to be important for virus eradication and control. To address this issue we performed a detailed molecular evolutionary and epidemiological analysis of IHNV and VHSV in trout farms from northern Italy. Full-length glycoprotein gene sequences of a selection of VHSV (n = 108) and IHNV (n = 89) strains were obtained. This revealed that Italian VHSV strains belong to sublineages Ia1 and Ia2 of genotype Ia and are distributed into 7 genetic clusters. In contrast, all Italian IHNV isolates fell within genogroup E, for which only a single genetic cluster was identified. More striking was that IHNV has evolved more rapidly than VHSV (mean rates of 11 and 7.3 × 10(-4) nucleotide substitutions per site, per year, respectively), indicating that these viruses exhibit fundamentally different evolutionary dynamics. The time to the most recent common ancestor of both IHNV and VHSV was consistent with the first reports of these pathogens in Italy. By combining sequence data with epidemiological information it was possible to identify different patterns of virus spread among trout farms, in which adjacent facilities can be infected by either genetically similar or different viruses, and farms located in different water catchments can be infected by identical strains. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of combining molecular and epidemiological information to identify the determinants of IHN and VHS spread, and to provide data that is central to future surveillance strategies and possibly control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01306DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4994472PMC
September 2016

Model for ranking freshwater fish farms according to their risk of infection and illustration for viral haemorrhagic septicaemia.

Prev Vet Med 2014 Aug 18;115(3-4):263-79. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

AusVet Animal Health Services, 140 Falls Road, Wentworth Falls, 2782 NSW, Australia.

We developed a model to calculate a quantitative risk score for individual aquaculture sites. The score indicates the risk of the site being infected with a specific fish pathogen (viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV); infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, Koi herpes virus), and is intended to be used for risk ranking sites to support surveillance for demonstration of zone or member state freedom from these pathogens. The inputs to the model include a range of quantitative and qualitative estimates of risk factors organised into five risk themes (1) Live fish and egg movements; (2) Exposure via water; (3) On-site processing; (4) Short-distance mechanical transmission; (5) Distance-independent mechanical transmission. The calculated risk score for an individual aquaculture site is a value between zero and one and is intended to indicate the risk of a site relative to the risk of other sites (thereby allowing ranking). The model was applied to evaluate 76 rainbow trout farms in 3 countries (42 from England, 32 from Italy and 2 from Switzerland) with the aim to establish their risk of being infected with VHSV. Risk scores for farms in England and Italy showed great variation, clearly enabling ranking. Scores ranged from 0.002 to 0.254 (mean score 0.080) in England and 0.011 to 0.778 (mean of 0.130) for Italy, reflecting the diversity of infection status of farms in these countries. Requirements for broader application of the model are discussed. Cost efficient farm data collection is important to realise the benefits from a risk-based approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2014.04.005DOI Listing
August 2014

An electronic learning course on avian influenza in Italy (2008).

Avian Dis 2010 Mar;54(1 Suppl):784-6

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Università 10, 35020 Legnaro (Padova), Italy.

The success of emergency intervention to control contagious animal diseases is dependent on the preparedness of veterinary services. In the framework of avian influenza preparedness, the Italian Ministry of Health, in cooperation with the National Reference Centers for Epidemiology and Avian Influenza, implemented an electronic learning course using new web-based information and communication technologies. The course was designed to train veterinary officers involved in disease outbreak management, laboratory diagnosis, and policy making. The "blended learning model" was applied, involving participants in tutor-supported self-learning, collaborative learning activities, and virtual classes. The course duration was 16 hr spread over a 4-wk period. Six editions were implemented for 705 participants. All participants completed the evaluation assignments, and the drop out rate was very low (only 4%). This project increased the number of professionals receiving high-quality training on AI in Italy, while reducing expenditure and maximizing return on effort.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1637/8758-033109-ResNote.1DOI Listing
March 2010