Publications by authors named "Chenfeng Zou"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nighttime sleep duration, restlessness and risk of multimorbidity - A longitudinal study among middle-aged and older adults in China.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2021 Nov 15;99:104580. Epub 2021 Nov 15.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address:

Purpose: To assess the associations of nighttime sleep duration and restlessness with the risk of multimorbidity in Chinese middle-aged and older adults.

Methods: We used the 2011 and 2015 surveys of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). Sleep duration was grouped into ≤ 5, (5-6], (6-8], (8-9], and > 9 h/night. Restlessness days in the past week were categorized into < 1, 1-2, 3-4, and 5-7 days/week. Multimorbidity was defined as the co-existence of two or more of 14 chronic conditions (hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, cancer, chronic lung disease, liver disease, heart problems, stroke, kidney disease, digestive disease, psychiatric problems, memory-related disease, arthritis, and asthma). Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the associations.

Results: A total of 6,037 participants free of multimorbidity at baseline were included. During four-years of follow-up, 2,203 (36.5%) participants developed multimorbidity. Compared to participants who slept 6-8 h/night, those with short sleep duration ≤ 5 h/night and 5-6 h/night were associated with 33.3% (95% CI: 14.8%-54.7%) and 24.2% (95% CI: 5.9%-45.6%) increased risk of multimorbidity, respectively. Long sleep duration was not significantly associated with incident multimorbidity. Compared to those who rarely or never had a restless sleep in the past week, participants with 5-7 days of restless sleep had increased risk of multimorbidity (RR: 1.750, 95% CI: 1.476-2.076). Similar findings were confirmed in subgroups by age, gender, and baseline chronic condition status.

Conclusions: Short nighttime sleep duration and restlessness were associated with increased risk of multimorbidity in China.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2021.104580DOI Listing
November 2021

The association of nighttime sleep duration and quality with chronic kidney disease in middle-aged and older Chinese: a cohort study.

Sleep Med 2021 10 13;86:25-31. Epub 2021 Aug 13.

School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address:

Objective: This cohort study aimed to assess the associations between sleep duration and quality with the risk of incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older Chinese.

Methods: We used the 2011 and 2015 surveys of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). Nighttime sleep duration was categorized into five groups: ≤4, (4-6], (6-8], (8-10], and >10 h/night. Sleep quality was assessed by restless days in the past week (<1, 1-2, 3-4, and 5-7 days/week). Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between sleep duration and quality with incident CKD.

Results: A total of 11,339 participants free of CKD at baseline were included in this study. After four years follow-up, the incidence of CKD was 7.8%. There was a "U-shaped" association between sleep duration and risk of CKD. Compared to 6-8 h of nighttime sleep duration, those who slept ≤4 h/night (RR: 1.639, 95% CI: 1.287-2.087) or >10 h/night (RR: 2.342, 95% CI: 1.007-5.451) had increased risk of developing CKD after adjustment for confounders. Participants with 5-7 restless days per week had significantly increased risk of CKD (adjusted RR: 1.686, 95% CI: 1.352-2.102), compared to those who rarely or never had a restless sleep.

Conclusions: Extreme nighttime sleep duration and poor sleep quality were associated with increased risk of CKD in middle-aged and older Chinese. Obtaining an optimal nighttime sleep duration and better sleep quality might reduce the risk of CKD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2021.08.007DOI Listing
October 2021
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