Publications by authors named "Chelsea Samson"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A step beyond BRET: Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL).

J Vis Exp 2014 May 23(87). Epub 2014 May 23.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur;

Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL) is a radiative excitation-emission process that produces increased signal and contrast enhancement in vitro and in vivo. FUEL shares many of the same underlying principles as Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET), yet greatly differs in the acceptable working distances between the luminescent source and the fluorescent entity. While BRET is effectively limited to a maximum of 2 times the Förster radius, commonly less than 14 nm, FUEL can occur at distances up to µm or even cm in the absence of an optical absorber. Here we expand upon the foundation and applicability of FUEL by reviewing the relevant principles behind the phenomenon and demonstrate its compatibility with a wide variety of fluorophores and fluorescent nanoparticles. Further, the utility of antibody-targeted FUEL is explored. The examples shown here provide evidence that FUEL can be utilized for applications where BRET is not possible, filling the spatial void that exists between BRET and traditional whole animal imaging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/51549DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4207116PMC
May 2014

In vitro and in vivo demonstrations of Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL).

Methods Mol Biol 2014 ;1098:259-70

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful technique that allows for deep-tissue analysis in living, intact organisms. However, in vivo optical imaging is compounded by difficulties due to light scattering and absorption. While light scattering is relatively difficult to overcome and compensate, light absorption by biological tissue is strongly dependent upon wavelength. For example, light absorption by mammalian tissue is highest in the blue-yellow part of the visible energy spectrum. Many natural bioluminescent molecules emit photonic energy in this range, thus in vivo optical detection of these molecules is primarily limited by absorption. This has driven efforts for probe development aimed to enhance photonic emission of red light that is absorbed much less by mammalian tissue using either direct genetic manipulation, and/or resonance energy transfer methods. Here we describe a recently identified alternative approach termed Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL), where bioluminescent molecules are able to induce a fluorescent response from fluorescent nanoparticles through an epifluorescence mechanism, thereby significantly increasing both the total number of detectable photons as well as the number of red photons produced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-718-1_20DOI Listing
May 2014

In vivo excitation of nanoparticles using luminescent bacteria.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012 Jun 21;109(23):8890-5. Epub 2012 May 21.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris cedex 15, France.

The lux operon derived from Photorhabdus luminescens incorporated into bacterial genomes, elicits the production of biological chemiluminescence typically centered on 490 nm. The light-producing bacteria are widely used for in vivo bioluminescence imaging. However, in living samples, a common difficulty is the presence of blue-green absorbers such as hemoglobin. Here we report a characterization of fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, a phenomenon that exploits radiating luminescence to excite nearby fluorophores by epifluorescence. We show that photons from bioluminescent bacteria radiate over mesoscopic distances and induce a red-shifted fluorescent emission from appropriate fluorophores in a manner distinct from bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. Our results characterizing fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrate how the resulting blue-to-red wavelength shift is both necessary and sufficient to yield contrast enhancement revealing mesoscopic proximity of luminescent and fluorescent probes in the context of living biological tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1204516109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384150PMC
June 2012
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