Publications by authors named "Charnjeet Sandhu"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Meta-Analysis of Cerebral Embolic Protection During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Am J Cardiol 2021 01 24;139:138-139. Epub 2020 Oct 24.

Division of Cardiology, Reading Hospital-Tower Health System, West Reading, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2020.10.038DOI Listing
January 2021

Unusual presentation of left ventricular rupture.

BMJ Case Rep 2020 Feb 2;13(1). Epub 2020 Feb 2.

Cardiology, University of California San Francisco, Fresno, California, USA.

We describe a case of 49-year-old man who presented with chest pain and was diagnosed with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed severe global hypokinesis of left ventricle with ejection fraction of 25%-30%. Left heart catheterisation showed severe right coronary stenosis and focal 60%-70% distal left anterior descending artery stenosis. Cardiac MRI (CMR) was done for evaluation of viability which showed a large pseudoaneurysm which was missed on TTE and left ventriculogram. Our case demonstrates the increasing importance of cardiac MRI in the diagnosis of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm. In our case left ventricular pseudoaneurysm was missed on TTE and left ventriculogram. It was diagnosed on CMR which was ordered for evaluation of myocardium viability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-231680DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7021133PMC
February 2020

Initiation of levothyroxine in a patient with hypothyroidism inducing adrenal crisis requiring VA ECMO: a tale of preventable disaster.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Aug 30;12(8). Epub 2019 Aug 30.

Pulmonary Medicine and Critical Care, UCSF, Fresno, California, USA.

A 31-year-old man with a recent diagnosis of hypothyroidism presented to the emergency department as a transfer from the clinic for severe hypotension and hypoglycaemia. The patient endorsed a 2-week history of severe fatigue, weight loss, nausea and non-bloody emesis. He was aggressively hydrated and vasopressors were initiated. Despite these measures, the patient remained hypotensive and went into pulseless electrical activity. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved via advanced cardiac life support protocol, and venous arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. On day 3 of hospitalisation, the patient was weaned off ECMO support, and subsequent autoimmune work-up confirmed the diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 with positive antiperoxidase antibodies (267 IU/mL), supporting the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-230601DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6721784PMC
August 2019

Internal medicine residents' point-of-care ultrasound skills and need assessment and the role of medical school training.

Adv Med Educ Pract 2019 31;10:379-386. Epub 2019 May 31.

Department of Internal Medicine, UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program, Fresno, CA, USA.

Point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) as a useful bedside tool is growing. Few studies have examined residents' attitude towards POCUS or compared POCUS image interpretation skills between residents with and without POCUS training in medical school. We distributed an anonymous survey and image interpretation test to assess residents' attitude towards POCUS, confidence, and skills in interpreting POCUS images and videos. Using independent samples t-tests, we compared mean confidence levels and test scores between residents with and without prior POCUS training. Fifty-two residents responded to survey (response rate 68%) and 59 took the image interpretation test (77%). Most residents (90%) reported being interested in POCUS. Residents with prior POCUS training (n=13) were either PGY-1 (9) or PGY-2 (4). No PGY-3 resident had prior training. Most residents (83%) thought POCUS could be extremely useful in the inpatient setting compared to 29% for outpatient setting. PGY-1 residents with prior training had a higher mean confidence level than PGY-1 residents without prior training, but the difference was not statistically significant (3.26 vs 2.64; =0.08). PGY-1 with prior training had a mean confidence level that was close to that of PGY-3 residents. PGY-1 residents with prior training scored significantly higher than PGY-1 residents without prior training in image interpretation test (10.25 vs 7; =0.01). Residents felt most confident in interpreting inferior vena cava images (mean 3.7; max. 5), which also had the highest score in image interpretation test (correct response rate of 88%). Our residents seem very interested in POCUS. PGY-1 residents with prior POCUS training in medical school seem to have higher confidence in their POCUS skills than PGY-1 residents without prior training and outperformed them in image interpretation test. The study is very instructive in building our future POCUS curriculum for residents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S198536DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6549795PMC
May 2019
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