Publications by authors named "Charlotte Kaeuffer"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

First Case of Bacteraemia Due to Carbapenem-Resistant .

Antibiotics (Basel) 2021 Mar 19;10(3). Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Laboratory of Bacteriology, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France.

Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are increasingly observed in nosocomial and community-acquired settings. Anaerobes are no exception to this rule, but there are fewer reports of MDR in the scientific literature on anaerobes than there are for other bacteria. In this short case report, we describe the first case of bacteraemia caused by a multidrug-resistant , which produces a carbapenemase encoded by the gene. This bacteraemia followed a digestive surgery operation. Surprisingly, these findings did not lead to a change in antibiotic therapy, probably because the patient's clinical state had improved. Nevertheless this report calls for better knowledge of anaerobic bacteria and for a systematic antimicrobial stewardship procedure following bacteraemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10030319DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8003481PMC
March 2021

The BASIC Score: A Useful Tool to Identify Patients at High Risk of Early Progression to Severe Coronavirus Disease 2019.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2020 Oct 1;7(10):ofaa405. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

CHU de Strasbourg, Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Strasbourg, France.

We developed a score, with easily accessible data (age, sex, body mass index, dyspnea, inflammatory parameters), to predict the risk of rapid progression to severe coronavirus disease 2019. Using a cutoff of >6 points, the negative predictive value was 87%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofaa405DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7499730PMC
October 2020

Clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with severe COVID-19: prospective analysis of 1,045 hospitalised cases in North-Eastern France, March 2020.

Euro Surveill 2020 12;25(48)

CHU de Strasbourg, Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases; Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

BackgroundIn March 2020, the COVID-19 outbreak was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization.AimOur objective was to identify risk factors predictive of severe disease and death in France.MethodsIn this prospective cohort study, we included patients ≥ 18 years old with confirmed COVID-19, hospitalised in Strasbourg and Mulhouse hospitals (France), in March 2020. We respectively compared patients who developed severe disease (admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) or death) and patients who died, to those who did not, by day 7 after hospitalisation.ResultsAmong 1,045 patients, 424 (41%) had severe disease, including 335 (32%) who were admitted to ICU, and 115 (11%) who died. Mean age was 66 years (range: 20-100), and 612 (59%) were men. Almost 75% of patients with body mass index (BMI) data (n = 897) had a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (n = 661). Independent risk factors associated with severe disease were advanced age (odds ratio (OR): 1.1 per 10-year increase; 95% CrI (credible interval): 1.0-1.2), male sex (OR: 2.1; 95% CrI: 1.5-2.8), BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m2 (OR: 1.8; 95% CrI: 1.2-2.7) or ≥ 30 (OR: 2.2; 95% CrI: 1.5-3.3), dyspnoea (OR: 2.5; 95% CrI: 1.8-3.4) and inflammatory parameters (elevated C-reactive protein and neutrophil count, low lymphocyte count). Risk factors associated with death were advanced age (OR: 2.7 per 10-year increase; 95% CrI: 2.1-3.4), male sex (OR: 1.7; 95% CrI: 1.1-2.7), immunosuppression (OR: 3.8; 95% CrI: 1.6-7.7), diabetes (OR: 1.7; 95% CrI: 1.0-2.7), chronic kidney disease (OR: 2.3; 95% CrI: 1.3-3.9), dyspnoea (OR: 2.1; 95% CrI: 1.2-3.4) and inflammatory parameters.ConclusionsOverweightedness, obesity, advanced age, male sex, comorbidities, dyspnoea and inflammation are risk factors for severe COVID-19 or death in hospitalised patients. Identifying these features among patients in routine clinical practice might improve COVID-19 management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.48.2000895DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7716399PMC
December 2020

Is COVID-19 infection more severe in kidney transplant recipients?

Am J Transplant 2021 03 28;21(3):1295-1303. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

There are no studies which have compared the risk of severe COVID-19 and related mortality between transplant recipients and nontransplant patients. We enrolled two groups of patients hospitalized for COVID-19, that is, kidney transplant recipients (KTR) from the French Registry of Solid Organ Transplant (n = 306) and a single-center cohort of nontransplant patients (n = 795). An analysis was performed among subgroups matched for age and risk factors for severe COVID-19 or mortality. Severe COVID-19 was defined as admission (or transfer) to an intensive care unit, need for mechanical ventilation, or death. Transplant recipients were younger and had more comorbidities compared to nontransplant patients. They presented with higher creatinine levels and developed more episodes of acute kidney injury. After matching, the 30-day cumulative incidence of severe COVID-19 did not differ between KTR and nontransplant patients; however, 30-day COVID-19-related mortality was significantly higher in KTR (17.9% vs 11.4%, respectively, p = .038). Age >60 years, cardiovascular disease, dyspnea, fever, lymphopenia, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were associated with severe COVID-19 in univariate analysis, whereas transplant status and serum creatinine levels were not. Age >60 years, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, CRP >60 mg/L, lymphopenia, kidney transplant status (HR = 1.55), and creatinine level >115 µmol/L (HR = 2.32) were associated with COVID-19-related mortality in univariate analysis. In multivariable analysis, cardiovascular disease, dyspnea, and fever were associated with severe disease, whereas age >60 years, cardiovascular disease, dyspnea, fever, and creatinine level>115 µmol/L retained their independent associations with mortality. KTR had a higher COVID-19-related mortality compared to nontransplant hospitalized patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajt.16424DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7753418PMC
March 2021

CT lung lesions as predictors of early death or ICU admission in COVID-19 patients.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2020 Oct 24;26(10):1417.e5-1417.e8. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Department of Infectious Disease, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

Objective: The main objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of early systematic chest computed tomography (CT) with quantification of lung lesions in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.

Methods: We studied 572 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (confirmed using polymerase chain reaction) for whom a chest CT was performed at hospital admission. Visual quantification was used to classify patients as per the percentage of lung parenchyma affected by COVID-19 lesions: normal CT, 0-10%, 11-25%, 26-50%, 51-75% and >75%. The primary endpoint was severe disease, defined by death or admission to the intensive care unit in the 7 days following first admission.

Results: The mean patient age was 66.0 ± 16.0 years, and 343/572 (60.0%) were men. The primary endpoint occurred in 206/572 patients (36.0%). The extent of lesions on initial CT was independently associated with prognosis (odds ratio = 2.35, 95% confidence interval 1.24-4.46; p < 0.01). Most patients with lung involvement >50% (66/95, 69.5%) developed severe disease compared to patients with lung involvement of 26-50% (70/171, 40.9%) and ≤25% (70/306, 22.9%) (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively). None of the patients with normal CT (0/14) had severe disease.

Conclusion: Chest CT findings at admission are associated with outcome in COVID-19 patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.07.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7378475PMC
October 2020

Venous thromboembolism in non-critically ill patients with COVID-19 infection.

Thromb Res 2020 09 17;193:166-169. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France; INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research), UMR 1260, Regenerative Nanomedicine, FMTS, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2020.07.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7367026PMC
September 2020

Rapid Radiological Worsening and Cytokine Storm Syndrome in COVID-19 Pneumonia.

Eur J Case Rep Intern Med 2020 2;7(7):001822. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

Background: In June 2020, a large randomised controlled clinical trial in the UK found that dexamethasone was effective in reducing the number of deaths in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Case Description: We describe a patient with rapid worsening of COVID-19 pneumonia and its dramatic improvement under corticosteroids.

Discussion: Corticosteroids could be useful in patients with an inflammatory profile, considering that acute respiratory distress syndrome may be the consequence of cytokine storm syndrome.

Learning Points: One of the main pathophysiological hypotheses for severe COVID-19 pneumonia is inappropriate immunological hyperactivation.Corticosteroid therapy may be useful in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12890/2020_001822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7350974PMC
July 2020

Coronavirus Disease 2019: Associated Multiple Organ Damage.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2020 Jul 21;7(7):ofaa249. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Service d'Anesthésie-Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

A 56-year-old man presented a particularly severe and multisystemic case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition to the common lung and quite common pulmonary embolism and kidney injuries, he presented ocular and intestinal injuries that, to our knowledge, have not been described in COVID-19 patients. Although it is difficult to make pathophysiological hypotheses about a single case, the multiplicity of injured organs argues for a systemic response to pulmonary infection. A better understanding of physiopathology should feed the discussion about therapeutic options in this type of multifocal damage related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofaa249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7336548PMC
July 2020

The Good, the Bad, and the Hoax: When Publication Instantaneously Impacts Treatment Strategies for COVID-19.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2020 07 22;64(8). Epub 2020 Jul 22.

CHU de Strasbourg, Service de Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01127-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7526849PMC
July 2020

An atypical cause of dyspnea.

Eur J Intern Med 2019 Oct 5;68:e5-e6. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

Department of Oncology and Hematology, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; Université de Strasbourg, Inserm, UMR-S1113 / IRFAC, Strasbourg, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2019.05.004DOI Listing
October 2019