Publications by authors named "Charles S Peterson"

4 Publications

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Preparticipation Evaluation for Climbing Sports.

Wilderness Environ Med 2015 Dec;26(4 Suppl):S40-6

Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Utah Health Care, Salt Lake City, Utah (Drs Ng and McIntosh).

Climbing is a popular wilderness sport among a wide variety of professional athletes and amateur enthusiasts, and many styles are performed across many environments. Potential risks confront climbers, including personal health or exacerbation of a chronic condition, in addition to climbing-specific risks or injuries. Although it is not common to perform a preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for climbing, a climber or a guide agency may request such an evaluation before participation. Formats from traditional sports PPEs can be drawn upon, but often do not directly apply. The purpose of this article was to incorporate findings from expert opinion from professional societies in wilderness medicine and in sports medicine, with findings from the literature of both climbing epidemiology and traditional sports PPEs, into a general PPE that would be sufficient for the broad sport of climbing. The emphasis is on low altitude climbing, and an overview of different climbing styles is included. Knowledge of climbing morbidity and mortality, and a standardized approach to the PPE that involves adequate history taking and counseling have the potential for achieving risk reduction and will facilitate further study on the evaluation of the efficacy of PPEs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2015.09.014DOI Listing
December 2015

Preparticipation Evaluation for Climbing Sports.

Clin J Sport Med 2015 Sep;25(5):412-7

*Family and Sports Medicine, University of Utah Health Care, Salt Lake City, Utah; †Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine; ‡Kaiser Permanente, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado; §Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Utah Health Care, Salt Lake City, Utah; ¶Arizona Sports Medicine Center, Mesa, Arizona; and ‖Central Maine Sports Medicine (a Clinical Division of CMMC), Evergreen Sports Medicine Fellowship, Lewiston, Maine.

Climbing is a popular wilderness sport among a wide variety of professional athletes and amateur enthusiasts, and many styles are performed across many environments. Potential risks confront climbers, including personal health or exacerbation of a chronic condition, in addition to climbing-specific risks or injuries. Although it is not common to perform a preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for climbing, a climber or a guide agency may request such an evaluation before participation. Formats from traditional sports PPEs can be drawn upon, but often do not directly apply. The purpose of this article was to incorporate findings from expert opinion from professional societies in wilderness medicine and in sports medicine, with findings from the literature of both climbing epidemiology and traditional sports PPEs, into a general PPE that would be sufficient for the broad sport of climbing. The emphasis is on low altitude climbing, and an overview of different climbing styles is included. Knowledge of climbing morbidity and mortality, and a standardized approach to the PPE that involves adequate history taking and counseling have the potential for achieving risk reduction and will facilitate further study on the evaluation of the efficacy of PPEs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0000000000000247DOI Listing
September 2015

The practical uses of ultrasound in a clinical setting to diagnose thrombosis of the ulnar artery.

Sports Health 2013 Jul;5(4):377-9

Arizona Sports Medicine Center, Mesa, Arizona.

A 43-year-old professional skateboarder presented to the sports medicine clinic with complaints of left wrist pain to the ulnar aspect. Two weeks prior to presentation, his wrist became suddenly painful with no specific trauma. He reported a history of falls over the years while skateboarding but none directly correlated to his onset of wrist pain. Radiographic results were negative for wrist or hand fracture. Physical examination yielded tenderness and mild swelling to the ulnar aspect of the wrist. Musculoskeletal ultrasound was used to assess tendon and ligament integrity, all of which was intact. Both radial and ulnar arteries were visualized, and ulnar artery thrombosis was incidentally diagnosed. He was advised to immediately proceed to the hospital, where an open arthrectomy was performed to the ulnar artery the following day. The patient was released from the hospital 2 days later and subsequently made a full recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1941738113478769DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3899904PMC
July 2013

Infectious disease and the extreme sport athlete.

Clin Sports Med 2007 Jul;26(3):473-87

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.

Extreme sport competition often takes place in locations that may harbor atypical diseases. This article discusses infections that may be more likely to occur in the extreme sport athlete, such as selected parasitic infections, marine infections, freshwater-borne diseases, tick-borne disease, and zoonoses. Epidemiology, presentation, treatment, complications, and return-to-sport issues are discussed for each of these diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2007.04.003DOI Listing
July 2007
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