Publications by authors named "Charles O Olaiya"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of supplementation on antioxidant and antidiabetic activities of yam flour.

J Food Sci Technol 2021 Nov 3;58(11):4110-4117. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Nutritional and Industrial Biochemistry Research Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

The practice of using nutritional knowledge to enhance the general health of the populace forms the basis of food fortification. In this study, an antioxidant-rich is substituted (1, 3, 5 and 10%) into yam tuber flour with the aim of improving the antidiabetic and antioxidant properties of the yam tuber flour. Antioxidant property was evaluated by polyphenol contents, ascorbic acid content, reducing effects, scavenging activity and inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. Antidiabetic activity was assessed by inhibition of α- amylase and α- glucosidase enzymes. The antioxidant property was significantly ( < 0.05) enhanced; also, the ability of the sample to inhibit the activity of α- amylase and α- glucosidase enzymes were significantly ( < 0.05) enhanced by supplementation with . The profiling of the samples by High Performance Liquid Chromatography revealed some proven antioxidant and antidiabetic agents which were enhanced in supplemented yam flour. It can be concluded from the results obtained in this study that powder could be a promising functional ingredient for yam flour in the management of diabetes and other oxidant-related diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-020-04872-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8405764PMC
November 2021

Structure-based virtual screening suggests inhibitors of 3-Chymotrypsin-Like Protease of SARS-CoV-2 from Vernonia amygdalina and Occinum gratissimum.

Comput Biol Med 2021 09 21;136:104671. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Human Nutraceuticals and Bioinformatics Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Salem University, Nigeria.

Antiviral culinary plants are potential bioresources for preventive nutraceuticals and/or antiviral drugs in COVID-19. Structure-based virtual screening was undertaken to screen 173 compounds previously reported from Vernonia amygdalina and Occinum gratissimum for direct interaction with the active site of the 3-Chymotrypsin-Like Protease (3CL) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Based on docking scores and comparison with reference inhibitors, a hit-list of 10 top phytocompounds was defined, which also had strong interactions with the catalytic centre of 3CL from three related strains of coronavirus (SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, HKU4). Among these, six compounds (neoandrographolide, vernolide, isorhamnetin, chicoric acid, luteolin, and myricetin) exhibited the highest binding tendencies to the equilibrated conformers of SARS-CoV-2 3CL in an in-depth docking analysis to 5 different representative conformations from the cluster analysis of the molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) trajectories of the protein. In silico drug-likeness analyses revealed two drug-like terpenoids viz: neoandrographolide and vernolide as promising inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 3CL. These structures were accommodated within the substrate-binding pocket; and interacted with the catalytic dyad (Cys and His), the oxyanion loop (residues 138-145), and the S1/S2 sub-sites of the enzyme active site through the formation of an array of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculation revealed that the terpenoid-enzyme complexes exhibit strong interactions and structural stability. Therefore, these compounds may stabilize the conformation of the flexible oxyanion loop; and thereby interfere with the tetrahedral oxyanion intermediate formation during the proteolytic activity of the enzyme.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compbiomed.2021.104671DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8294106PMC
September 2021

Curculigo pilosa mitigates against oxidative stress and structural derangements in pancreas and kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

J Complement Integr Med 2020 Apr 9. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Nutritional and Industrial Biochemistry Research Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Background Curculigo pilosa (African crocus) is widely used in folklore medicine to treat diabetes mellitus and its associated complications. This study was carried out to evaluate this traditional claim by mechanistic investigation of the effect of corn steep liquor extract of Curculigo pilosa and its n-butanol and methanol solvent fractions on hyperglycemia mediated oxidative damage in pancreas and kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes mellitus was induced by single intraperitoneal administration of (50 mg/kg) streptozotocin and diabetic rats were treated orally with the extract(s) once in a day for 28 days. After experimental period, the effect of the extract(s) on hyperglycemia mediated oxidative stress was assessed by determination of lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes. Also histopathology studies were conducted to substantiate the protective effects on pancreas and kidney. Results Oral administration of the extract significantly (p<0.05) mitigated the hyperglycemia mediated oxidative damage via improving the antioxidant system, inhibit the generation of lipid peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. Also administration of extracts improved the structural architecture of the pancreas and kidney tissues in diabetic rats. Conclusion The results obtained in this study provide resounding scientific support for the folkloric use of Curculigo pilosa in the management of diabetes mellitus and its complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2019-0217DOI Listing
April 2020

Dietary consumption of monosodium L-glutamate induces adaptive response and reduction in the life span of Drosophila melanogaster.

Cell Biochem Funct 2017 Apr 16;35(3):164-170. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

Adaptive response is the ability of an organism to better counterattack stress-induced damage in response to a number of different cytotoxic agents. Monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), the sodium salt of amino acid glutamate, is commonly used as a food additive. We investigated the effects of MSG on the life span and antioxidant response in Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster). Both genders (1 to 3 days old) of flies were fed with diet containing MSG (0.1, 0.5, and 2.5-g/kg diet) for 5 days to assess selected antioxidant and oxidative stress markers, while flies for longevity were fed for lifetime. Thereafter, the longevity assay, hydrogen peroxide (H O ), and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species levels were determined. Also, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, and total thiol content were evaluated in the flies. We found that MSG reduced the life span of the flies by up to 23% after continuous exposure. Also, MSG increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and H O generations and total thiol content as well as the activities of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in D. melanogaster (P < .05). In conclusion, consumption of MSG for 5 days by D. melanogaster induced adaptive response, but long-term exposure reduced life span of flies. This study may therefore have public health significance in humans, and thus, moderate consumption of MSG is advocated by the authors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbf.3259DOI Listing
April 2017
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