Dr Charles A Gullo, PhD - Marshall University Medical School - Associate Dean

Dr Charles A Gullo

PhD

Marshall University Medical School

Associate Dean

Huntington, WV | United States

Main Specialties: Allergy & Immunology

Additional Specialties: Medical Education, Cancer Immunology

Dr Charles A Gullo, PhD - Marshall University Medical School - Associate Dean

Dr Charles A Gullo

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Marshall University Medical School - Huntington, WV , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Publications

24Publications

305Reads

-Profile Views

302PubMed Central Citations

The future is in the numbers: the power of predictive analysis in the biomedical educational environment.

Authors:
Charles A Gullo

Med Educ Online 2016 1;21:32516. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

Office of Medical Education, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA;

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4931024PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/meo.v21.32516DOI Listing
July 2017
15 Reads

Lessons from the transition of a ‘fee for service’ to ‘fee-for value’ in American academic medical centers- can medical education programs learn from this experience?

Authors:
Gullo C

MedEdPublish 2016 Dec 12; 1-4.

MedEdPublish

Academic medical centers and other health care systems are adapting and innovating in response to the evolving nature of reimbursement models emerging in the American health care landscape. As traditional fee-for-service compensation yields to fee-for-value, health providers are developing and deploying processes and technology to identify patients who are most at risk for adverse outcomes to manage their encounters with the system and to improve the quality of care and patient outcomes. Programs such as Accountable Care Organization (ACO) and Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) are now regular topics of discussion throughout board rooms, management suites and clinics. These shifts in payment models required a large amount of data and analysis. The analysis of big data is now a large part of the healthcare industry. We propose the consideration of whether a comparable approach to aspects of medical science education might spark similar innovation.

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December 2016
6 Reads

Twelve tips for facilitating team-based learning.

Med Teach 2015 ;37(9):819-24

a Duke NUS Graduate Medical School , Singapore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/0142159X.2014.1001729DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4776725PMC
June 2016
36 Reads
1 Citation
2.045 Impact Factor

Predicting Medical Student Success on Licensure Exams

Med Sci Educ. 2015 Dec 25:4, 447-453

Medical Science Educator

Many schools seek to predict performance on national exams required for medical school graduation using prematriculation and medical school performance data. The need for targeted intervention strategies for at-risk students has led much of this interest. Assumptions that preadmission data and high stakes in-house medical exams correlate strongly with national standardized exam performance needs to be examined. Looking at prematriculation data for predicting USMLE Step 1 performance, we found that MCAT exam totals and math-science GPA had the best prediction from a set of prematriculation values (adjusted R 2 = 11.7 %) for step 1. The addition of scores from the first medical school exam improved our predictive capabilities with a linear model to 27.9 %. As we added data to the model, we increased our predictive values as expected. However, it was not until we added data from year 2 exams that we started to get step 1 prediction values that exceeded 50 %. Stepwise addition of more exams in year two resulted in much higher predictive values but also led to the exclusion of many early variables. Therefore, our best step 1 predictive value of around 76.7 % consisted of three variables from a total of 37. These data suggest that the preadmission information is a relatively poor predictor of licensure exam performance and that including class exam scores allows for much more accurate determination of students who ultimately proved to be at risk for performance on their licensure exams. The continuous use of this data, as it becomes available, for assisting at-risk students is discussed (251).

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December 2015
6 Reads

A Disease-Based Approach to the Vertical and Horizontal Integration of a Medical Curriculum

Med Sci Educ. 2015 Nov. First Online. p1-11

Medical Science Educator

As medical disciplines have become increasingly interdisciplinary and evidenced-based medicine is widely practiced, there is a need for curricula that reflect these changes. The newly revised Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) standards 1.1 Strategic Planning and Continuous Quality Improvement and 8.3 Curricular Design, Review, Revision/Content Monitoring require ongoing curricular review to assure accreditation compliancy. We have completed a comprehensive review of our curriculum and have moved from a discipline-based curriculum to that of one that focuses on a systems/disease-based model. The approach allows for a more horizontally integrated curriculum in the preclinical years, while the use of 115 distinct diseases and 8 themes creates a quality assurance mechanism that allows for tracking of vertical integration across the entire curriculum. The first step in the development of this quality assurance model was to establish and empower a newly formed integration subcommittee. This subcommittee was tasked with developing a model to review, track, and improve the horizontal and vertical integration of the curriculum. Our integrated curriculum is now in its second year having completed the initial identification of gaps and redundancies through a process that relies on the mapping of diseases and themes throughout the courses. This ongoing review and evaluation mechanism has created a dynamic quality assurance process that allows our faculty to address issues of both horizontal and vertical integration of our curriculum at the course level.

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November 2015
5 Reads

Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 associates with CD137 ligand and mediates its reverse signaling.

FASEB J 2013 Aug 25;27(8):2957-66. Epub 2013 Apr 25.

Department of Physiology, Duke–National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.12-225250DOI Listing
August 2013
6 Reads
5 Citations
5.043 Impact Factor

Inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines by CD137 ligand signaling.

PLoS One 2010 May 26;5(5):e10845. Epub 2010 May 26.

Cancer Immunology Laboratory, Department of Clinical Research, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0010845PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2877096PMC
May 2010
23 Reads
5 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Use of phage display to isolate specific human monoclonal antibody fragments against a potential target for multiple myeloma.

Ann Acad Med Singapore 2009 Jul;38(7):621-9

Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.

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July 2009
14 Reads
2 Citations
1.221 Impact Factor

Association of Epstein-Barr virus with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and current status of development of cancer-derived cell lines.

Ann Acad Med Singapore 2008 Sep;37(9):769-77

Cancer Immunology Laboratory, Department of Clinical Research, SingHealth Research Facilities, Singapore.

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September 2008
7 Reads
15 Citations
1.221 Impact Factor

Ku86 exists as both a full-length and a protease-sensitive natural variant in multiple myeloma cells.

Cancer Cell Int 2008 Apr 29;8. Epub 2008 Apr 29.

Department of Clinical Research (DCR), Cancer Immunology Laboratory, Singapore General Hospital (SGH), Outram Road, Singapore 169608, Singapore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2867-8-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2386117PMC
April 2008
6 Reads
5 Citations
1.990 Impact Factor

Detection and quantification of the abelson tyrosine kinase domains of the BCR-ABL gene translocation in chronic myeloid leukaemia using genomic quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Ann Acad Med Singapore 2006 Oct;35(10):680-7

Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory (MMRL), SingHealth Research Facilities, Singapore.

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October 2006
14 Reads
1.221 Impact Factor

Decoupling of normal CD40/interleukin-4 immunoglobulin heavy chain switch signal leads to genomic instability in SGH-MM5 and RPMI 8226 multiple myeloma cell lines.

Leukemia 2006 Apr;20(4):715-23

Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory (MMRL), Singapore Health Services (SingHealth) Research Facilities, Singapore, Singapore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.leu.2404099DOI Listing
April 2006
4 Reads
2 Citations
10.431 Impact Factor

The biology of Ku and its potential oncogenic role in cancer.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2006 Apr 25;1765(2):223-34. Epub 2006 Jan 25.

Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory, MMRL, Singapore Health Services, SingHealth, 7 Hospital Drive, Block A #02-05, Singapore 169611, Republic of Singapore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbcan.2006.01.001DOI Listing
April 2006
13 Reads
36 Citations

Defective B cell responses in the absence of SH2D1A.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2005 Mar 17;102(13):4819-23. Epub 2005 Mar 17.

Division of Immunology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0408681102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC555707PMC
March 2005
29 Reads
20 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Expression of the SH2D1A gene is regulated by a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

Eur J Immunol 2004 Nov;34(11):3176-86

Division of Immunology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.200324755DOI Listing
November 2004
20 Reads
6 Citations
4.034 Impact Factor

Heat shock proteins: to present or not, that is the question.

Immunol Lett 2004 Jun;94(1-2):1-10

The Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory, Singapore Health Services (SingHealth), 7 Hospital Drive, Block A #02-05, Singapore 169611, Singapore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.imlet.2004.04.002DOI Listing
June 2004
27 Reads
12 Citations
2.512 Impact Factor

The cell surface receptor SLAM controls T cell and macrophage functions.

J Exp Med 2004 May;199(9):1255-64

Division of Immunology, RE-204, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 41 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20031835DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2211908PMC
May 2004
49 Reads
51 Citations
12.520 Impact Factor

Structural basis for the interaction of the free SH2 domain EAT-2 with SLAM receptors in hematopoietic cells.

EMBO J 2001 Nov;20(21):5840-52

Division of Immunology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/emboj/20.21.5840DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC125701PMC
November 2001
5 Reads
24 Citations
10.434 Impact Factor

CD150 is a member of a family of genes that encode glycoproteins on the surface of hematopoietic cells.

Immunogenetics 2001 Jul;53(5):382-94

Division of Immunology, RE-204, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

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July 2001
5 Reads
13 Citations
2.230 Impact Factor

SAP controls T cell responses to virus and terminal differentiation of TH2 cells.

Nat Immunol 2001 May;2(5):410-4

Division of Immunology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/87713DOI Listing
May 2001
4 Reads
59 Citations
20.004 Impact Factor

Generation of IL-2-dependent cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) with altered TCR responses derived from antigen-dependent CTL clones.

J Immunol 1999 Jun;162(11):6466-72

Department of Microbiology, Beirne B. Carter Center for Immunology Research, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville 22908, USA.

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June 1999
5 Reads
4.922 Impact Factor

Ca2+ signaling modulates cytolytic T lymphocyte effector functions.

J Exp Med 1998 Apr;187(7):1057-67

Department of Microbiology, University of Virginia, Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2212215PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.187.7.1057DOI Listing
April 1998
7 Reads
18 Citations
12.520 Impact Factor

IL-2 induces Fas ligand/Fas (CD95L/CD95) cytotoxicity in CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocyte clones.

J Immunol 1997 Jun;158(12):5612-8

Department of Microbiology and the Beirne B. Carter Center for Immunology Research, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville 22908, USA.

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June 1997
4 Reads
8 Citations
4.922 Impact Factor