Publications by authors named "Chanya Kengradomkij"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence of toxoplasmosis in semi-domesticated and pet cats within and around Bangkok, Thailand.

BMC Vet Res 2021 Jul 22;17(1):252. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand.

Background: Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic zoonoses worldwide. Cats become infected after ingesting infected tissue cysts. The objective of the present study was to compare the prevalence of toxoplasmosis in pet cats and semi-domesticated cats in the Bangkok metropolitan region. A survey of Toxoplasma infection was conducted in 260 cats (median age [range]: 3 years [10 months-10 years]; 155 females and 105 males) by collecting blood samples from 130 client-owned pet cats and 130 semi-domesticated cats within and around Bangkok during 2016-2017 using indirect fluorescence antibody tests. An IgG antibody to Toxoplasma antigen ratio of ≥1:100 was considered positive for Toxoplasma infection.

Results: The overall prevalence of T. gondii in cats was 6.5% (17/260). The prevalence of T. gondii in semi-domesticated cats and pet cats was 11.5 and 1.5%, respectively. Semi-domesticated cats aged 1-5 years (14.9%) had a higher prevalence of infection than domesticated cats (1.3%, p = 0.002) of the same age. The odds (95% confidence interval [CI]) of having T. gondii infection in semi-domesticated cats were 8.34 (1.86-76.29, p = 0.0017) times higher than in pet cats. Interestingly, there was an association between T. gondii infection according to city ​region (p = 0.002). The odds (95% CI) of having T. gondii infection in cats living in the inner city were 4.96 (1.03-47.16, p = 0.023) times higher than cats living in the suburb and the vicinity.

Conclusions: The present study identified a higher prevalence of Toxoplasma infection in semi-domesticated cats compared with pet cats. The semi-domesticated cats could serve as a zoonotic reservoir. Public health regulations should be implemented to prevent toxoplasmosis spread.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-021-02965-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8296730PMC
July 2021

Molecular Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Stray Dogs and sensu lato Ticks from Bangkok, Thailand.

Pathogens 2021 May 6;10(5). Epub 2021 May 6.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand.

Canine tick-borne pathogens (CTBPs) such as , , , and are important pathogens in dogs worldwide. sensu lato, the main vector of several CTBPs, is the most common tick species found on dogs in Thailand. The present study identified CTBPs in dogs and ticks infested dogs. Samples (360 dog blood samples and 85 individual ticks) were collected from stray dogs residing in 37 temples from 24 districts in Bangkok and screened for CTBPs using molecular techniques. The most common CTBP found infecting dogs in this study was (38.3%) followed by (34.2%), (19.7%), (18.1%), and (13.9%), respectively. Furthermore, (22.4%) was the most common CTBP in ticks followed by (18.8%), (9.4%), (5.9%), and (2.4%), respectively. The detection of CTBPs from the present study highlights the potential risk of infections that may occur in stray dogs and their ticks residing in Bangkok temples. These findings underline the importance of performing active surveys to understand the complexity of distributions of CTBPs in dogs and their ticks in Thailand.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10050561DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8148546PMC
May 2021

Molecular detection of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. from stray dogs residing in monasteries in Bangkok, Thailand.

Parasitol Int 2021 Aug 23;83:102337. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand. Electronic address:

Both Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis are enteric protozoan parasites that infect a wide variety of domestic animals as well as humans worldwide, causing diarrheal diseases. Giardia duodenalis assemblages C and D are specific to canine hosts and zoonotic assemblages A and B are also found in dogs as a reservoir host. In dogs, Cryptosporidium canis is the host-specific species while humans are infected by C. hominis and C. parvum and at least another 16 zoonotic Cryptosporidium species have been reported causing human infections, with C. meleagridis, C. viatorum, and C. ubiquitum being the most frequent. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis from stray dogs in areas of Bangkok and to identify the species and assemblages. Fecal samples (540) were collected from dogs residing in 95 monasteries in 48 districts in the Bangkok metropolitan area. Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was performed using the ssu-rRNA gene for both parasites. In total, 3.0% (16/540) samples were positive for G. duodenalis, with most being G. duodenalis assemblage D (7/16) followed by assemblage C (7/16) and zoonotic assemblage A (2/16). The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 0.7% (4/540) based on the PCR results and all were the dog genotype C. canis. These results indicated that dogs residing in Bangkok monasteries poses a limited role as source of human giardiosis and cryptosporidiosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2021.102337DOI Listing
August 2021

Detection of antibodies to among owned dogs in Cambodia.

Food Waterborne Parasitol 2021 Mar 15;22:e00103. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand.

is a protozoan parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa, which has a two-host life cycle and an extensive global distribution. The presence of antibodies to was examined in owned dogs in Cambodia. In total, 103 dog serum samples from 37 households in northern Cambodia were collected and examined for evidence of infection using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. In total, 52 of 103 (50.5%) samples were serologically positive for in this study. No significant risk factor associated with infection was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the seroprevalence of in dogs from Cambodia, which revealed a considerable risk of infection for humans. Therefore, consuming undercooked dog meat or contacting feces with contaminated cat feces should be restricted to avoid the possibility of zoonosis. Further studies are needed to determine the epidemiology of in populations of larger dogs and other animals to improve our understanding of the situation of the pathogen in this country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fawpar.2020.e00103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7758511PMC
March 2021

Cats as potential mammalian reservoirs for Rickettsia sp. genotype RF2125 in Bangkok, Thailand.

Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports 2018 08 3;13:188-192. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand. Electronic address:

Rickettsia felis is an obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria and the cause of flea-borne spotted fever (FBSF), an emerging zoonosis of global public health importance, for which dogs and cats have been implicated as potential mammalian reservoirs hosts. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors for R. felis-like species in semi-domesticated cats and their fleas in aim of understanding public health risks posed by cats and their fleas in Bangkok, Thailand. Single whole blood samples (n = 432) and where observed, fleas (n = 234), were collected from cats from 53 temple communities in Bangkok. Fleas were morphologically and genetically identified to a species level. Cat blood and fleas were subjected to a spotted fever group (SFG)-specific PCR targeting the partial outer membrane protein B (ompB). Those that were positive, were further characterised using an R. felis-specific nested PCR targeting the partial citrate synthase A (gltA) gene. All fleas were identified as Ctenocephalides felis felis. In total SFG Rickettsiae were detected in the blood of 82/482 (17.01%) cats and 3/234 fleas (1.28%). DNA sequencing of the partial ompB characterised all positive amplicons from cat blood and their fleas as 100% identical to Rickettsia endosymbiont of Ctenocephalides felis orientis isolate (Rickettsia sp. genotype RF2125) and Rickettsia asemboensis (GenBank accession no. KP256362 and KY650699, respectively). The gltA gene targeting R. felis was successfully amplified from 12/82 PCR-positive cat blood samples and these clustered with 99% bootstrap support with isolates within the Rickettsia sp. genotype RF2125 clade. Cats that were permitted to roam freely inside monasteries were more likely to be infected with R. felis compared with cats confined indoors. The results suggest that cats in Thailand are potential mammalian reservoir hosts for Rickettsia sp. genotype RF2125.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vprsr.2018.07.001DOI Listing
August 2018

Prevalence and molecular characterization of bovine Cryptosporidium from dairy cows in Northern Thailand.

Acta Parasitol 2017 Dec;62(4):772-774

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Cryptosporidiosis is a common protozoan infection in humans and domestic animals. It is the culprit for significant neonatal morbidity in cattle as well as weight loss and delayed growth, which leads to large economic losses in the farming industry. Furthermore, bovine Cryptosporidium is also a principal source of human Cryptosporidium infections. The purpose of this study is to determine prevalence and genotype of Cryptosporidium spp. from feces of dairy cows from the northern parts of Thailand (Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang provinces). A total of 500 fecal samples were collected directly from the rectum and they were examined for potential presence of Cryptosporidium infection by using tests such as DMSO-modified acid fast stain, immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 5% by DMSO-modified acid fast stain, 7% by IFAT and 7.6% by PCR respectively. The main genotypes of Cryptosporidium spp. identified were Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium bovis. Therefore, as a result of this study, it can be said that, due to the potential cross-species transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum, infected dairy cows may pose a potential zoonotic risk to humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/ap-2017-0092DOI Listing
December 2017

Prevalence and genotype of Giardia duodenalis in dairy cattle from Northern and Northeastern part of Thailand.

Acta Parasitol 2015 Sep;60(3):459-61

The aims of this study were to determine prevalence and genotype of Giardia duodenalis in feces of dairy cattle from the northern part and the northeastern part of Thailand. A total of 900 fecal samples were collected directly from rectum and examined by using zinc sulphate centrifugal flotation technique and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The overall prevalence of G. duodenalis in dairy cows was 5.0 % (45/900) by zinc sulphate centrifugal flotation and 6.0 % (54/900) by PCR. Genotypes of G. duodenalis found in this study were Assemblage AI and E. The results indicated that dairy cattle may act as a potential risk of Giardia transmission among animals and humans (especially Assemblage AI).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/ap-2015-0063DOI Listing
September 2015

Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with exposure of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) to Neospora caninum in northeast Thailand.

Vet Parasitol 2015 Jan 27;207(1-2):156-60. Epub 2014 Nov 27.

University of Missouri, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, 201 Connaway Hall, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.

Water buffalo are important draft animals for agriculture in resource-restricted areas worldwide. Water buffalo were shown to be experimentally susceptible to infection with Neospora caninum, potentially affected by neosporosis, and naturally exposed to the parasite in Asia. Although enzootic to Thailand, the distribution of N. caninum among Thai water buffalo is unclear. The objectives of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of N. caninum among water buffalo of northeast Thailand and to identify risk factors associated with their exposure to N. caninum. Sera from 628 water buffalo from 288 farms were tested with an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). A total of 57 samples from 48 herds contained antibodies to N. caninum, indicating overall seroprevalence of 9.1% and 16.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The overall seroprevalence was highest in provinces located in the Khorat Basin in the southern part of the region tested. Host age was also associated with seroprevalence, with the greatest seroprevalence (16.1%) among buffalo over 10 years of age, followed by 5-10 years of age (13.4%), 3-5 years (9.2%), and less than 3 years (1.2%). These results collectively suggested that horizontal transmission from canine definitive hosts was an important route of water buffalo exposure to N. caninum. These results also verified the importance of risk factor analysis for effective bovine neosporosis control strategies at the local level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.10.034DOI Listing
January 2015

Molecular detection of Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes from northeast Thailand.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2014 Feb 14;46(2):487-90. Epub 2013 Nov 14.

The objectives of this study were to determine the individual and herd-level prevalence and genotype of Cryptosporidium and to identify putative risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes in northeast Thailand. Fecal samples from 600 water buffaloes of 287 farms in six provinces were collected and tested using DMSO-modified acid-fast staining and polymerase chain reaction. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections in buffaloes was 5.7 and 8.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The provinces with highest infected Cryptosporidium were located in the Sakon Nakhon Basin in the northern part of the region. In addition, higher herd prevalence was observed among farms with more than five buffaloes (30%) than those with five or less animals (16.2%). Thirty (88.2%) of the 34 Cryptosporidium-positive samples were Cryptosporidium parvum and four (11.8%) were Cryptosporidium ryanae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-013-0499-8DOI Listing
February 2014

Epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection of stray cats in Bangkok, Thailand.

Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health 2010 Jan;41(1):13-8

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.

The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis in stray cats in Bangkok. Sera were collected during 2006 and examined by Sabin-Feldman dye test. Five hundred sixty-four male and 926 female cats in and around monasteries from 50 districts were collected. Toxoplasma gondii was detected in 72 (4.8%) of 1,490 cats. The prevalence was significantly higher in females (5.6%) than in males (3.6%). Cats more than 5 years old had the highest infection rate (5.1%). Fifty-six percent (28/50) of areas were positive for T. gondii in cats. Our results show T. gondii is widespread in stray cats in Bangkok. It is essential to control the number of stray cats in order to reduce the transmission of toxoplasmosis to animals and humans.
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January 2010

Antibody-ELISA for Trypanosoma evansi: application in a serological survey of dairy cattle, Thailand, and validation of a locally produced antigen.

Prev Vet Med 2009 Aug 27;90(3-4):233-41. Epub 2009 May 27.

Center for International Cooperation in Agronomical Research for Development (CIRAD), Department of Biological Systems (Bios), UMR177-Trypanosomes (IRD-CIRAD), Montpellier F-34000, France.

Trypanosoma evansi is generally considered a mild pathogen in bovines. However, in Asia, acute and chronic signs have been observed in cattle, with high levels of parasitaemia, abortion and death. Investigations in Asian cattle are needed to better understand this epidemiological situation. To generate comparable data at a regional level, development and standardization of an antibody-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for T. evansi (ELISA/T. evansi) was initiated and applied in an epidemiological survey carried out in dairy cattle in Thailand. A batch of 1979 samples was collected from dairy farms located throughout the country's four regions. Soluble T. evansi antigens initially produced in France were also produced in Thailand for comparison and technology transfer. Screening of 500 samples allowed us to identify reference samples and to determine the cut-off value of the ELISA. Seropositive animals - some of them confirmed by PCR - were found in the four regions, in 12 out of 13 provinces, in 22 out of 31 districts, in 56 farms out of 222 (25%, 95%CI+/-6%) and in 163 animals out of 1979 (8.2, 95%CI+/-1.2%). Estimated seroprevalence in 35 farms ranged between 1% and 30%, and in 21 farms it was >30%. Approximately 25% of survey cattle were exposed to the infection, in various situations. A sub-sample of 160 sera was tested on both antigens. Wilcoxon's (Z=1.24; p=0.22) and McNemars's tests (CHI2=3.55; p=0.09) did not show any significant differences, showing that the locally produced antigen is suitable for further evaluation in the surrounding countries. Use of this standardized serological method will broaden knowledge of the prevalence and impact of the disease at the regional level in South-East Asia. Further validation of this ELISA will be necessary in other host species such as buffalo, horse and pig.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2009.04.011DOI Listing
August 2009
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