Publications by authors named "Chandra Subramaniam"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens.

Genome Res 2014 Oct 11;24(10):1676-85. Epub 2014 Jul 11.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, United Kingdom;

Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.168955.113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4199364PMC
October 2014

Expressed sequence tags from Eimeria brunetti--preliminary analysis and functional annotation.

Parasitol Res 2011 Apr 14;108(4):1059-62. Epub 2010 Dec 14.

Department of Animal Biotechnology, Madras Veterinary College, Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai, 600007, India.

As a first attempt to generate sequence information from the protein-coding genes of the genomically unknown parasite, Eimeria brunetti, a cDNA library was generated from purified sporozoites in the λTriplEx2™ vector. Analysis of 283 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the cDNA library constructed revealed 12 contigs (26 ESTs) and 257 singletons. BLASTx analysis revealed that 50 transcripts had significant matches to known proteins, whereas the remaining 233 had no significant matches, probably representing novel genes. Based on Gene Ontology classification, the transcripts were categorized as biological process (46 ESTs), molecular function (37 ESTs), and cellular component (19 ESTs). The transcripts analyzed show maximum homology to the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Despite the small number of transcripts, this is the first transcriptome analysis of E. brunetti and provides preliminary data that will increase understanding of parasite biological function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-010-2182-6DOI Listing
April 2011

Chromosome-wide analysis of gene function by RNA interference in the african trypanosome.

Eukaryot Cell 2006 Sep;5(9):1539-49

School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Trypanosomatids of the order Kinetoplastida are major contributors to global disease and morbidity, and understanding their basic biology coupled with the development of new drug targets represents a critical need. Additionally, trypanosomes are among the more accessible divergent eukaryote experimental systems. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei contains 8,131 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), of which over half have no known homologues beyond the Kinetoplastida and a substantial number of others are poorly defined by in silico analysis. Thus, a major challenge following completion of the T. brucei genome sequence is to obtain functional data for all trypanosome ORFs. As T. brucei is more experimentally tractable than the related Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. and shares >75% of their genes, functional analysis of T. brucei has the potential to inform a range of parasite biology. Here, we report methods for systematic mRNA ablation by RNA interference (RNAi) and for phenotypic analysis, together with online data dissemination. This represents the first systematic analysis of gene function in a parasitic organism. In total, 210 genes have been targeted in the bloodstream form parasite, representing an essentially complete phenotypic catalogue of chromosome I together with a validation set. Over 30% of the chromosome I genes generated a phenotype when targeted by RNAi; most commonly, this affected cell growth, viability, and/or cell cycle progression. RNAi against approximately 12% of ORFs was lethal, and an additional 11% had growth defects but retained short-term viability in culture. Although we found no evidence for clustering or a bias towards widely evolutionarily conserved genes within the essential ORF cohort, the putative chromosome I centromere is adjacent to a domain containing genes with no associated phenotype. Involvement of such a large proportion of genes in robust growth in vitro indicates that a high proportion of the expressed trypanosome genome is required for efficient propagation; many of these gene products represent potential drug targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/EC.00141-06DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1563588PMC
September 2006
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