Publications by authors named "Chaiwat Aneklaphakij"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diversity of Chemical Structures and Biosynthesis of Polyphenols in Nut-Bearing Species.

Front Plant Sci 2021 6;12:642581. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Graduate School of Biological Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Japan.

Nuts, such as peanut, almond, and chestnut, are valuable food crops for humans being important sources of fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols. Polyphenols, such as flavonoids, stilbenoids, and hydroxycinnamates, represent a group of plant-specialized (secondary) metabolites which are characterized as health-beneficial antioxidants within the human diet as well as physiological stress protectants within the plant. In food chemistry research, a multitude of polyphenols contained in culinary nuts have been studied leading to the identification of their chemical properties and bioactivities. Although functional elucidation of the biosynthetic genes of polyphenols in nut species is crucially important for crop improvement in the creation of higher-quality nuts and stress-tolerant cultivars, the chemical diversity of nut polyphenols and the key biosynthetic genes responsible for their production are still largely uncharacterized. However, current technical advances in whole-genome sequencing have facilitated that nut plant species became model plants for omics-based approaches. Here, we review the chemical diversity of seed polyphenols in majorly consumed nut species coupled to insights into their biological activities. Furthermore, we present an example of the annotation of key genes involved in polyphenolic biosynthesis in peanut using comparative genomics as a case study outlining how we are approaching omics-based approaches of the nut plant species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2021.642581DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8056029PMC
April 2021

Cross-Species Metabolic Profiling of Floral Specialized Metabolism Facilitates Understanding of Evolutional Aspects of Metabolism Among Brassicaceae Species.

Front Plant Sci 2021 31;12:640141. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Graduate School of Biological Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Japan.

Plants produce a variety of floral specialized (secondary) metabolites with roles in several physiological functions, including light-protection, attraction of pollinators, and protection against herbivores. Pigments and volatiles synthesized in the petal have been focused on and characterized as major chemical factors influencing pollination. Recent advances in plant metabolomics have revealed that the major floral specialized metabolites found in land plant species are hydroxycinnamates, phenolamides, and flavonoids albeit these are present in various quantities and encompass diverse chemical structures in different species. Here, we analyzed numerous floral specialized metabolites in 20 different Brassicaceae genotypes encompassing both different species and in the case of crop species different cultivars including self-compatible (SC) and self-incompatible (SI) species by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Of the 228 metabolites detected in flowers among 20 Brassicaceae species, 15 metabolite peaks including one phenylacyl-flavonoids and five phenolamides were detected and annotated as key metabolites to distinguish SC and SI plant species, respectively. Our results provide a family-wide metabolic framework and delineate signatures for compatible and incompatible genotypes thereby providing insight into evolutionary aspects of floral metabolism in Brassicaceae species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2021.640141DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8045754PMC
March 2021

Taxonomic Notes on the 'Mahat' ( and , Moraceae) Species Complex in Thailand.

Plants (Basel) 2020 Mar 22;9(3). Epub 2020 Mar 22.

Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

'Mahat' is a well-known medicinal plant utilized in Thailand. The Thai name 'Mahat' has been used in many scientific articles for years. However, it is, unpredictably, a homonym of two scientific names in Flora of Thailand, i.e., and . Additionally, both species are complex due to their high morphological variation. This causes difficulties in species identification especially when this Thai name is referred to as the scientific name for research publication, quality control of pharmaceutical raw materials, and registration of pharmaceutical products. In this study, we scrutinized the taxonomy of 'Mahat' by detailed examination of its morphology and distribution, including molecular and qualitative phytochemical studies. Leaf surfaces were inspected using scanning electron microscopy. The phylogeny of both species was studied using DNA sequences of nuclear and plastid regions. Chromatographic fingerprints, focusing on the major active compound oxyresveratrol, were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography. According to our current study, phylogenetic evidence showed that some samples of both species were clustered together in the same clade and phytochemical fingerprints were almost identical. These results are valuable data for taxonomic revision in the near future and reveal the possible utilization of as a new material source of oxyresveratrol in the pharmaceutical industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants9030391DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7154811PMC
March 2020