Publications by authors named "Cerithsa A E Martina"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Conditional deletion of TGF-βR1 using Langerin-Cre mice results in Langerhans cell deficiency and reduced contact hypersensitivity.

J Immunol 2011 Nov 12;187(10):5069-76. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

Department of Immunology, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The critical role of Langerhans cells (LC) in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) was recently questioned in studies using different LC-depletion mouse models. On one hand, inducible ablation of LC led to diminished ear swelling, suggesting functional redundancy between LC and (Langerin(+)) dermal dendritic cells (DC). On the other hand, constitutive or acute depletion of LC resulted in an enhanced reaction, supporting a regulatory role of LC in CHS. To address this controversy by conditional gene targeting, we generated Langerin-Cre knockin mice. Breeding these mice to a Cre-reporter strain demonstrated robust and specific DNA recombination in LC, as well as other Langerin(+) tissue DC. In agreement with the vital requirement of TGF-β signaling for LC development, crossing Langerin-Cre to mice homozygous for a loxP-flanked TGF-βR1 allele resulted in permanent LC deficiency, whereas the homeostasis of dermal Langerin(+) DC was unaffected. In the absence of LC, induction of CHS in these Langerin(+) DC-specific TGF-βR1-deficient mice elicited decreased ear swelling compared with controls. This novel approach provided further evidence against a regulatory function of LC in CHS. Moreover, these Langerin-Cre mice represent a unique and powerful tool to dissect the role and molecular control of Langerin(+) DC populations beyond LC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1101880DOI Listing
November 2011

Langerhans cells are required for efficient presentation of topically applied hapten to T cells.

J Immunol 2007 Nov;179(10):6830-5

Department of Cell Biology and Histology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in the control of T cell immunity due to their ability to stimulate naive T cells and direct effector function. Murine and human DC are composed of a number of phenotypically, and probably developmentally, distinct subsets, which may play unique roles in the initiation and regulation of T cell responses. The skin is populated by at least two subsets of DC: Langerhans cells (LC), which form a contiguous network throughout the epidermis, and dermal DC. LC have classically been thought vital to initiate T cell responses to cutaneous Ags. However, recent data have highlighted the importance of dermal DC in cutaneous immunity, and the requirement for LC has become unclear. To define the relative roles of LC and dermal DC, we and others generated mouse models in which LC were specifically depleted in vivo. Unexpectedly, these studies yielded conflicting data as to the role of LC in cutaneous contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Extending our initial finding, we demonstrate that topical Ag is inefficiently transported to draining lymph nodes in the absence of LC, resulting in suboptimal priming of T cells and reduced CHS. However, dermal DC may also prime cutaneous T cell responses, suggesting redundancy between the two different skin DC subsets in this model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.179.10.6830DOI Listing
November 2007

Polymorphisms in proinflammatory genes and susceptibility to typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever.

J Interferon Cytokine Res 2007 Apr;27(4):271-9

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Host genetic factors are thought to contribute to susceptibility and outcome in infectious diseases. A polymorphism in a proinflammatory gene, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA - 308), was recently found to be associated with susceptibility to typhoid fever. As the observation was made in hospitalized patients, a potential confounder could be that the TNFA polymorphism is associated with the severity of established illness resulting in hospital admission rather than susceptibility to disease. We tested whether the association with TNFA - 308 is present also in typhoid fever patients enrolled in a community-based case-control study in an endemic area in Indonesia. Common polymorphisms in other proinflammatory genes were assayed as well. Samples of patients with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever (n = 90) and paratyphoid fever (n = 26) and fever controls (n = 337) were compared with those of community controls (n = 322). In these groups, we analyzed polymorphisms in TNFA by PCR and RFLP, polymorphisms of IFNG, IL1A, IL1B, IL1R1, TNFRSF1A, CASP1, and CRP by Sequenom MassArray (San Diego, CA), and polymorphisms in IL12B and IFNGR1 by fragment length analysis. The IL1R1 polymorphisms were nearly absent in the Indonesian population. The TNFA - 308 polymorphism was not associated with typhoid fever (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.1-1.0) in this population. The polymorphisms at TNFA - 238 or in IFNG, IL1A, IL1B, IL12B, TNFRSF1A, IFNGR1, CASP1, and CRP were also not associated with typhoid or paratyphoid fever. We conclude that polymorphisms in proinflammatory genes do not contribute to susceptibility to typhoid fever and, in view of earlier findings, suggest that the TNFA - 308 polymorphism is likely related to severity of established disease rather than to susceptibility per se.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jir.2006.0129DOI Listing
April 2007

IL-10 and toll-like receptor-4 polymorphisms and the in vivo and ex vivo response to endotoxin.

Cytokine 2005 Mar;29(5):215-28

Department of Infectious Diseases, C5-P42, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

To determine to what extent lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-10 production capacity is determined by polymorphisms in toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the IL-10 promoter region, we measured in vivo IL-10 and TNF-alpha production in patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, a major surgical trauma associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury that triggers an endotoxemia and profound inflammatory response in most patients. Ex vivo the IL-10 and TNF-alpha production was measured in a whole blood stimulation assay, using 3 LPS concentrations. Positive correlations were found between TNF-alpha and IL-10 production ex vivo, upon stimulation with each of the LPS concentrations. Also, the estimated TNF-alpha and IL-10 EC50, and TNF-alpha(max) and IL-10max were positively correlated (r = 0.203; p = 0.023 and r = 0.287; p = 0.001, respectively), indicating that these parameters describing LPS sensitivity and maximal production capacity, respectively, can be estimated by measuring either TNF-alpha or IL-10. Interleukin-10 concentrations in patients experiencing endotoxemia in vivo negatively correlated with the IL-10 levels produced upon stimulation with 1000 ng/mL LPS as well as the estimated IL-10max ex vivo. In vivo, a positive correlation between the TNF-alpha concentration at time-point 2 and the IL-10 concentration at time-point 3 was found, consistent with an important contribution of the magnitude of TNF-alpha release upon the subsequent IL-10 production. Carriers of the IL-10 promoter -1330G, -1082A, -819T, -592A (GATA) haplotype had lower IL-10 production ex vivo upon stimulation with 10 and 100 ng/mL LPS and higher EC50 values (the estimated LPS concentration at which 50% of the maximal IL-10 response is reached) as compared to carriers of the other haplotypes combined, indicating decreased LPS sensitivity ex vivo. These individuals did not differ from the others in interleukin-10 production capacity upon stimulation with a high LPS concentration (i.e., 1000 ng/mL) and the estimated IL-10(max) values, were similar, indicating unimpaired maximal IL-10 production capacity ex vivo. Carriers of the IL-10 promoter AGCC haplotype had lower EC50 values as compared to carriers of the other haplotypes combined, indicating increased LPS sensitivity ex vivo. In accordance with this finding, carriers of the AGCC haplotype had higher circulating IL-10 levels in vivo. The common TLR4 polymorphisms (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile) were associated with slightly higher IL-10 production capacity ex vivo and in vivo, however, this was not statistically significant. Our results indicate that polymorphisms in the proximal IL-10 promoter region are associated with in vivo and ex vivo LPS sensitivity. The contribution to the inter-individual variation, however, is limited since the variation between individuals in LPS sensitivity and IL-10 production capacity can only partly be attributed to these IL-10 promoter polymorphisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2004.12.005DOI Listing
March 2005

TNF-alpha promoter, Nod2 and toll-like receptor-4 polymorphisms and the in vivo and ex vivo response to endotoxin.

Cytokine 2004 Apr;26(1):16-24

Department of Infectious Diseases, C5-P42, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Humans exhibit substantial inter-individual differences in TNF-alpha production upon endotoxin stimulation. To determine to what extent the lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production capacity in vivo and ex vivo is determined by polymorphisms in toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), the TNF-alpha promoter region and Nod2, we screened for two TLR4 polymorphisms, a Nod2 polymorphism and the TNF-alpha promoter polymorphisms. We measured the perioperative endotoxemia and TNF-alpha production and the TNF-alpha production capacity of each patient in a whole-blood stimulation assay using blood drawn before anesthesia, using various LPS concentrations, in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. This operation represents a major surgical trauma associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury and triggers an endotoxemia and profound inflammatory response. In vivo TNF-alpha production was positively correlated with the level of endotoxemia after aortic declamping; thus TNF-alpha levels were higher in patients having endotoxemia compared to patients without endotoxemia. This correlation was observed in patients with any of the genotypes studied, and did not differ between the various genotypes. In vivo TNF-alpha levels correlated best with those ex vivo after stimulation with 1000 ng/mL LPS, and the estimated maximal TNF-alpha release capacity. Subjects with the wild-type TLR4 gene had similar levels of TNF-alpha upon LPS stimulation ex vivo as compared with patients carrying Asp299Gly and/or the Thr399Ile TLR4 polymorphism. Our results indicate that polymorphisms in the TLR4 receptor, Nod2 and TNF-alpha promoter region are not strongly associated with in vivo and ex vivo TNF-alpha production capacity upon endotoxin stimulation. This suggests that in this model of natural LPS release, the variation between individuals in TNF-alpha release can only modestly be determined by genetic background (TNF-alpha promoter, Nod2 and TLR4) of the individual.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2003.12.003DOI Listing
April 2004
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