Publications by authors named "Celso Vieira Leite"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

BRAZILIAN GASTRIC CANCER ASSOCIATION GUIDELINES (PART 2): UPDATE ON TREATMENT.

Arq Bras Cir Dig 2021 14;34(1):e1563. Epub 2021 May 14.

Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Background: : The II Brazilian Consensus on Gastric Cancer of the Brazilian Gastric Cancer Association BGCA (Part 1) was recently published. On this occasion, countless specialists working in the treatment of this disease expressed their opinion in the face of the statements presented.

Aim: : To present the BGCA Guidelines (Part 2) regarding indications for surgical treatment, operative techniques, extension of resection and multimodal treatment.

Methods: To formulate these guidelines, the authors carried out an extensive and current review regarding each declaration present in the II Consensus, using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO databases initially with the following descriptors: gastric cancer, gastrectomy, lymphadenectomy, multimodal treatment. In addition, each statement was classified according to the level of evidence and degree of recommendation.

Results: : Of the 43 statements present in this study, 11 (25,6%) were classified with level of evidence A, 20 (46,5%) B and 12 (27,9%) C. Regarding the degree of recommendation, 18 (41,9%) statements obtained grade of recommendation 1, 14 (32,6%) 2a, 10 (23,3%) 2b e one (2,3%) 3.

Conclusion: : The guidelines complement of the guidelines presented here allows surgeons and oncologists who work to combat gastric cancer to offer the best possible treatment, according to the local conditions available.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0102-672020210001e1563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8121052PMC
May 2021

BRAZILIAN GASTRIC CANCER ASSOCIATION GUIDELINES (PART 1): AN UPDATE ON DIAGNOSIS, STAGING, ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT AND FOLLOW-UP.

Arq Bras Cir Dig 2020 18;33(3):e1535. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Background: The II Brazilian Consensus on Gastric Cancer by the Brazilian Gastric Cancer Association (ABCG) was recently published. On this occasion, several experts in gastric cancer expressed their opinion before the statements presented.

Aim: To present the ABCG Guidelines (part 1) regarding the diagnosis, staging, endoscopic treatment and follow-up of gastric cancer patients.

Methods: To forge these Guidelines, the authors carried out an extensive and current review regarding each statement present in the II Consensus, using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO databases with the following descriptors: gastric cancer, staging, endoscopic treatment and follow-up. In addition, each statement was classified according to the level of evidence and degree of recommendation.

Results: Of the 24 statements, two (8.3%) were classified with level of evidence A, 11 (45.8%) with B and 11 (45.8%) with C. As for the degree of recommendation, six (25%) statements obtained grade of recommendation 1, nine (37.5%) recommendation 2a, six (25%) 2b and three (12.5%) grade 3.

Conclusion: The guidelines presented here are intended to assist professionals working in the fight against gastric cancer with relevant and current information, granting them to be applied in the daily medical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0102-672020200003e1535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7747489PMC
December 2020

II BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON GASTRIC CANCER BY THE BRAZILIAN GASTRIC CANCER ASSOCIATION.

Arq Bras Cir Dig 2020 24;33(2):e1514. Epub 2020 Aug 24.

Hospital das Clínicas, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Background: Since the publication of the first Brazilian Consensus on Gastric Cancer (GC) in 2012 carried out by the Brazilian Gastric Cancer Association, new concepts on diagnosis, staging, treatment and follow-up have been incorporated.

Aim: This new consensus is to promote an update to professionals working in the fight against GC and to provide guidelines for the management of patients with this condition.

Methods: Fifty-nine experts answered 67 statements regarding the diagnosis, staging, treatment and prognosis of GC with five possible alternatives: 1) fully agree; 2) partially agree; 3) undecided; 4) disagree and 5) strongly disagree A consensus was adopted when at least 80% of the sum of the answers "fully agree" and "partially agree" was reached. This article presents only the responses of the participating experts. Comments on each statement, as well as a literature review, will be presented in future publications.

Results: Of the 67 statements, there was consensus in 50 (74%). In 10 declarations, there was 100% agreement.

Conclusion: The gastric cancer treatment has evolved considerably in recent years. This consensus gathers consolidated principles in the last decades, new knowledge acquired recently, as well as promising perspectives on the management of this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0102-672020190001e1514DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7448865PMC
September 2020

Vocal Characteristics of Patients With Morbid Obesity.

J Voice 2021 Mar 21;35(2):329.e7-329.e11. Epub 2019 Oct 21.

Department of Surgery, São Paulo State University (Unesp), Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Introduction: Obesity modifies vocal characteristics, causing abnormal fat deposition in the abdominal region and upper airways. For some authors the voice of the obese is not different from nonobese and the vocal symptoms are scarce; for others dysphonia in obese is reported by 70% of them and the voice becomes hoarse, breathy, and unstable.

Objective: To characterize the voice of patients with morbid obesity.

Methods: Two groups were included: Obese (n-27), aged between 26 and 59 years, selected for bariatric surgery; Control (n-27), matched in age, with ideal weight for height.

Parameters: Vocal self-assessment (Vocal Disadvantage Index-IDV and Quality of Life and Voice-QVV); Perceptual-auditory vocal evaluation (GRBASI scale), maximum phonation time; Acoustic vocal analysis and Videolaryngoscopic exams.

Results: In obese, the most frequent symptoms were gastroesophageal and hoarseness. The vocal self-evaluation did not record any relevant complaints in both groups. In obese, the perceptual-auditory voice evaluations indicated significant changes in R (roughness), B (breathiness), I (instability), and S (tension) parameters. Acoustic vocal analysis recorded changes in the noise-harmonic ratio (NHR) and soft phonation index (SPI) parameters. The videolaryngoscopy examinations showed, in control and obese groups, respectively: normal: 92.5% and 55.5%; posterior pachydermia: 11.1% and 33.3%; mid-posterior bowing: 0% and 7.4%; edema/congestion: 0% and 7.40%.

Conclusion: The voice of the obese becomes discreetly hoarse, breathless, and unstable. The most frequent videolaryngoscopic findings in obese patients are hyperemia and edema of vocal folds and posterior pachydermia, related to acid laryngitis, secondary to gastroesophageal reflux.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2019.09.012DOI Listing
March 2021

Association of 5-HT2C (rs3813929) and UCP3 (rs1800849) gene polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes in obese women candidates for bariatric surgery.

Arch Endocrinol Metab 2017 Jul-Aug;61(4):326-331

Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (Unesp), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Alimentos e Nutrição, Araraquara, SP, Brasil.

Objective: Obesity can cause systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) factor that is also influenced by genetic variability. The present study aims to investigate the association between gene polymorphisms related with obesity on the prevalence of SAH and DM2 in the preoperative period and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

Subjects And Methods: In total, 351 obese women in a Brazilian cohort completed the study. The clinical diagnosis of SAH and DM2 was monitored from medical records. Twelve gene polymorphisms (rs26802; rs572169; rs7799039; rs1137101; rs3813929; rs659366; rs660339; rs1800849; rs7498665; rs35874116; rs9701796; and rs9939609) were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and TaqMan assay.

Results: In the preoperative period, prevalence of SAH and DM2 was 57% and 22%, respectively. One year postoperatively, 86.8% subjects had remission of DM2 and 99.5% had control of SAH. Subjects with T allele from the serotonin receptor gene (5-HT2C, rs3813929) had five times greater chance of DM2, and the CC genotype from uncoupling protein 3 gene (UCP3, rs1800849) had three times greater chance in the preoperative period.

Conclusion: These findings indicate that polymorphisms rs3813929 and rs1800849 from 5-HT2C and UCP3 genes were related to DM2 prevalence among the Brazilian obese women candidates for bariatric surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/2359-3997000000260DOI Listing
October 2017

Periodontal status and pathogenic bacteria after gastric bypass: a cohort study.

J Clin Periodontol 2015 Jun 28;42(6):530-6. Epub 2015 May 28.

Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

Aim: The aim this study was to evaluate the influence of gastric bypass surgery (GBS) on periodontal disease and quantify the periodontopathogenic bacteria in patients undergoing this surgery.

Material And Methods: This prospective study was composed of 50 patients who underwent bariatric surgery and the data collection was performed in three periods pre-operative, 6 (6M) and 12 months (12 M) postoperative. The oral clinical examination to assess periodontal disease; gingival fluid sample collection for quantification of the periodontopathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Prevotella intermedia using q-PCR; body mass index (BMI) and for collection of the individual's health-related data from medical files.

Results: There was a significant reduction in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and glucose levels after surgery. The mean probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) increased significantly in the postoperative period of 6 months (p = 0.001). In the same period, the amount of P. gingivalis increased (p = 0.028) and the other bacteria decreased slightly (p > 0.050). In the presence of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, T. denticola and P. intermedia, a poor periodontal condition was observed.

Conclusion: The periodontal disease increased in severity and P. gingivalis increased after GBS. A systemic inflammation resolution due to bariatric surgery in obese subjects does not seem to affect the course of periodontal disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpe.12410DOI Listing
June 2015

Ferritin in hypertensive and diabetic women before and after bariatric surgery.

Nutr Hosp 2014 Oct 16;31(2):666-71. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Alimentos e Nutrição - Ciências Nutricionais, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas (UNESP-FcFar), Araraquara-SP Instituto de Biociências da Universidade Estadual Paulista (IB-UNESP), Botucatu-SP. Brazil..

Unlabelled: In addition to its important role as marker of iron stores, serum ferritin is a marker of systemic inflammation, and obesity has been associated with chronic inflammation.

Objective: To verify, six months after surgery, the effect of bariatric surgery on the serum ferritin of women who were hypertensive, diabetic, or comorbidity free before surgery.

Sample And Methods: This retrospective study included 200 women aged 20 to 45 years, with a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 35 kg/m2, submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Seventy of these women were hypertensive, forty had type 2 diabetes (T2D), and ninety were comorbidity free (CF). They were assessed before and six months after surgery. Anthropometric, laboratory (serum ferritin and hemoglobin), and comorbidity- related data were collected from their medical records.

Results: Before surgery, women with comorbidities were older, the hypertensives had higher BMI, and the diabetics had higher serum ferritin levels than the CF women. The study comorbidities had resolved in 68% of the hypertensive women and 86% of the diabetic women six months after RYGB. Also at this time, the serum ferritin of hypertensive women decreased from 110.1±86.3 to 88.7±80.5 ng/dL and of diabetic women, from 164.8±133.4 to 101.2±97.7 ng/dL (p0.05).

Conclusion: High ferritin in premenopausal obese women was associated with the main obesity-related comorbidities, and these comorbidities determined the reduction of serum ferritin after bariatric surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3305/nh.2015.31.2.7629DOI Listing
October 2014

Brazilian consensus in gastric cancer: guidelines for gastric cancer in Brazil.

Arq Bras Cir Dig 2013 Jan-Mar;26(1):2-6

Brazilian Association of Gastric Cancer - ABCG.

Background: In Brazil, gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy among men and sixth among women. The cause is multivariate and the risks are well known. It has prognosis and treatment defined by the location and staging of the tumor and number of lymph nodes resected and involved.

Aim: The Brazilian Consensus on Gastric Cancer promoted by ABCG was designed with the intention to issue guidelines that can guide medical professionals to care for patients with this disease.

Methods: Were summarized and answered 43 questions reflecting consensus or not on diagnosis and treatment that may be used as guidance for its multidisciplinary approach. The method involved three steps. Initially, 56 digestive surgeons and related medical specialties met to formulate the questions that were sent to participants for answers on scientific evidence and personal experience. Summaries were presented, discussed and voted in plenary in two other meetings. They covered 53 questions involving: diagnosis and staging (six questions); surgical treatment (35 questions); chemotherapy and radiotherapy (seven questions) and anatomopathology, immunohistochemistry and perspective (five questions). It was considered consensus agreement on more than 70% of the votes in each item.

Results: All the answers were presented and voted upon, and in 42 there was consensus.

Conclusion: It could be developed consensus on most issues that come with the care of patients with gastric cancer and they can be transformed in guidelines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-67202013000100002DOI Listing
March 2014

Evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea in obese patients scheduled for bariactric surgery.

Acta Cir Bras 2013 Apr;28(4):317-22

Postgraduate Program in General Bases of Surgery, FMB, UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil.

Purpose: To evaluate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in obese patients scheduled for bariatric surgery and their identification for risk of OSA by Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) and excessive daytime sleepiness by Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS).

Methods: Fifty nine patients were evaluated by BQ and ESS. Out of these individuals, 35 performed a full-night sleep study using a type 3 portable monitoring (PM). The questionnaire results were compared for gender and BMI. The presence and severity of OSA was correlated with gender and both questionnaires.

Results: 94.75% of the respondents presented high risk for OSA by BQ and 59.65% presented positivity by ESS. Taking into account the AHI> 5 per hour for OSA diagnosis, all of them presented OSA, average AHI of 45.31 ± 26.3 per hour and 68.6% have severe OSA (AHI>30). The male patients had a higher AHI (p<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the positivity in both questionnaires as well as the severity of OSA measured by AHI (p<0.05).

Conclusion: The frequency and severe obstructive sleep apnea in the studied group is high. The Berlin Questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale had a positive correlation with the diagnosis of OSA in the group studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-86502013000400012DOI Listing
April 2013

Ring influence on ponderal evolution after four years of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

Arq Bras Cir Dig 2012 Oct-Dec;25(4):257-62

Clínica Bariátrica, Hospital Fornecedores de Cana, Piracicaba, SP.

Background: Use of ring in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is still a matter of controversy among bariatric surgeons. There is no consensus on its impact in relation to weight loss and weight maintenance in the long term.

Aim: To evaluate the influence of the ring on the evolution of body weight over four years after bariatric surgery.

Methods: Retrospective analyzis of 143 women who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass paired on the use or not use of Silastic® ring. Follow-up time was 48 months. Inclusion criteria were age over 18 years, primary bariatric operation and regular attendance at the clinic during the period of interest for research. The technique kept small gastric reservoir estimated in a volume of 30 ml. The food limb had in average 150 cm and the bile one 40 cm from the duodenojejunal angle. The group "ring" used Silastic® device with length of 6.5 cm, placed 2 cm from gastrojejunal anastomosis. The ring was closed for five polypropylene surgical thread sutures. In the morning after surgery the patients received isotonic fluids; on the second day salty liquid diet and were discharged on the third day. Semisolid diet started from the 20th day and solid on the 30th, with daily tablet of polivitamins.

Results: The weight loss was larger on the ring than without ring groups in all periods, respectively 10% and only 5% in the third postoperative year. The proportion of not having reached the 50% excess weight loss expectative was significantly higher in the group without ring than in the group with the ring (31% and 8% respectively in the fourth year). There was no difference between groups in delayed recovery of weight lost with the operation.

Conclusions: The results were favorable to use the ring exclusively when it is analyzed only the weight loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-67202012000400009DOI Listing
August 2013

Food intake in women two years or more after bariatric surgery meets adequate intake requirements.

Nutr Res 2012 May 11;32(5):335-41. Epub 2012 May 11.

Graduate Program in Food and Nutrition/Nutrition Sciences, Paulista State University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Araraquara/SP, Brazil.

Restricted food intake after bariatric surgery can be an important factor both in the long-term control of body weight and in the onset of nutritional deficiencies. The objective of this study was to assess the adequacy of food intake in women two or more years after bariatric surgery according to the excess weight lost. A group of 141 women who underwent banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) was divided according to the percentage of excess weight they lost (%EWL)<50; 50┤75; = 75. The habitual energy and nutrient intakes were determined by a 24-hour recall over two days and the probability of adequate intake was based on the Dietary Reference Intake. The mean total estimated energy requirement (EER) as well as energy, macronutrient and cholesterol intakes did not differ among the groups. Only the %EWL<50 group had an intake equal to their EER, but they presented a higher number of inadequacies, such as low levels of magnesium, folic acid and vitamins C and E. Calcium and dietary fiber intakes were extremely low in all three groups. In conclusion, weight loss after surgery is associated with food habits that favor energy intake over micronutrient intake.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2012.03.016DOI Listing
May 2012

Comparative study between two techniques of incisional hernia repair with polypropylene mesh in rabbits.

Acta Cir Bras 2010 Oct;25(5):423-7

Department of Surgery and Orthopedics, Botucatu Medical School, UNESP, Brazil.

Purpose: To compare two different incisional hernia repair techniques (repair with a polypropylene mesh reinforcement on the peritonium-aponeurosis versus polypropylene mesh sutured to the borders of the hernial ring as a bridge) in rabbits.

Methods: Incisional hernia was experimentally developed through a 4-cm median incision in 60 rabbits. After 30 days, half of the animals were operated for primary wall closure and placement of a polypropylene mesh reinforcement, while the other half had a polypropylene mesh sutured to the borders of the hernial ring as a bridge. Clinical development, scar breaking strength, as well as gross, microscopic and morphometric parameters were evaluated in all animals 30, 60, and 90 days after repair.

Results: No significant differences in breaking strength or histological parameters were observed between groups at any time point studied. No statistical difference regarding complications was detected, although denser and firmer adhesions to the abdominal wall were seen after the mesh was placed as a " bridge" .

Conclusions: No significant differences between the incisional hernia repair techniques assessed were observed regarding breaking strength, and histological and morphometric parameters. The number of complications was similar in both study groups. However, adhesion of abdominal cavity organs to the scar area was much denser after the placement of a mesh to bridge the defect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-86502010000500007DOI Listing
October 2010

Methylation status of CDH1 gene in samples of gastric mucous from Brazilian patients with chronic gastritis infected by Helicobacter pylori.

Arq Gastroenterol 2010 Jan-Mar;47(1):7-12

Hemocentro, Faculdade de Medicina, UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil.

Context: Gastric cancer is one of the top list of cancer types that most leads to death in Brazil and worldwide. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is a class I carcinogen and infect almost 90% of chronic gastritis patients. Some genotypes confer different virulent potential to H. pylori and can increase the risk of gastritis development. Methylation of CpG islands can inactivate tumor suppressor genes and therefore, it can be involved in the tumorigenic process. CDH1 is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes the E-cadherin protein, which is important in maintaining cell-cell contacts. The inactivation of this gene can increase the chance of metastasis. Promoter methylation of CDH1 at early steps of gastric carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood.

Objective: In this study, we investigated the methylation status of CDH1 in chronic gastritis samples and correlated it with the presence of H. pylori.

Methods: Sixty gastric mucosal biopsies were used in this study. The detection of H. pylori was performed with the PCR primers specific to urease C gene. H. pylori genotyping was performed by PCR to cagA and vacA (s and m region). The methylation status of these gene CDH1 was analyzed using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed using primers methylated and unmethylated in both forward and reverse directions.

Results: H. pylori was detected in 90% of chronic gastritis samples; among these 33% were cagA positive and 100% vacA s1. The genotype vacA s2/m1 was not detected in any sample analyzed. Methylation of CDH1 was detected in 63.3% of chronic gastritis samples and 95% of them were also H. pylori-positive.

Conclusion: This work suggests that CDH1 gene methylation and H. pylori infection are frequent events in samples from Brazilian patients with chronic gastritis and reinforces the correlation between H. pylori infection and CDH1 inactivation in early steps of gastric tumorigenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0004-28032010000100002DOI Listing
December 2010

[Body weight evolution and classification of body weight in relation to the results of bariatric surgery: roux-en-Y gastric bypass].

Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol 2010 Mar;54(3):303-10

Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP, Brasil.

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the evolution and classification of body weight in relation to the results of bariatric surgery in women who underwent the procedure more than two years ago.

Subjects And Method: A total of 141 women underwent banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The participants were divided according to the time elapsed since surgery and the percentage of excess weight lost (%EWL): < 50; 50 upper and lower left quadrants 75; and > 75.

Results: The women in the group with %EWL < 50 (15.6%) remained obese, while those with %EWL > 75 (36.2%) ranged from normal to pre-obese and presented lower late weight gain than the women in the other groups.

Conclusion: Weight evolution two or more years after surgery showed the expected reductions, with some individuals responding better to surgery than others. This shows that it is necessary to monitor, investigate and intervene to obtain the desired results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0004-27302010000300009DOI Listing
March 2010

Helicobacter pylori and EBV in gastric carcinomas: methylation status and microsatellite instability.

World J Gastroenterol 2010 Jan;16(3):312-9

Blood Transfusion Center, Botucatu Medical School, UNESP - Sao Paulo State University, Distrito de Rubião Júnior, s/n, 18618-970 Botucatu-SP, Brazil.

Aim: To verify the methylation status of CDH1, DAPK, COX2, hMLH1 and CDKN2A genes and to evaluate their association with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-cagA(+) and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infections in gastric adenocarcinomas.

Methods: Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay was performed in 89 primary gastric carcinomas (intestinal and diffuse types). Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis was performed using the BAT26 primer set and PCR products were analyzed with the ABI PRISM 3100 Genetic Analyzer using Genescan 3.7 software (Applied Biosystems). Detection of H. pylori and genotyping were performed by PCR, using specific primers for ureaseC and cagA genes. The presence of EBV was assessed by in situ hybridization. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi(2) or Fisher's exact test.

Results: The most frequent hypermethylated gene was COX-2 (63.5%) followed by DAPK (55.7%), CDH1 (51%), CDKN2A (36%) and hMLH1 (30.3%). Intestinal and diffuse adenocarcinomas showed different methylation profiles and there was an association between methylation of E-CDH1 and H. pylori-cagA(+) in the intestinal adenocarcinoma type. MSI was correlated with hMLH1 methylation. There was an inverse correlation between DAPK hypermethylation and MSI.

Conclusion: We found a strong association between CDH1 methylation and H. pylori-cagA(+) in intestinal-type gastric cancer, association of MSI and better prognosis and an heterogeneous COX-2 overexpression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v16.i3.312DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2807951PMC
January 2010

Alterations in the intestinal wall due to protein malnutrition in rats: evaluation of the rupture strength and the tissue's collagen.

Acta Cir Bras 2008 Sep-Oct;23(5):435-40

Department of Otorrinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University, Brazil.

Purpose: To study the effect of protein malnutrition on the intestinal wall of rats by evaluating alterations in the rupture force and dosing tissue collagen in the ileum and distal colon.

Methods: One hundred and twenty rats, that had an average weight of 100g, were used. They received water and a standard diet with 20% protein during 7 days for adaptation to the diet itself and to environmental conditions. After that period, the animals were randomly distributed in two groups of 60 rats each: Group 1 - the animals received a control diet with 20% casein for 21 days; Group 2 - hypoprotein diet with 2% casein for 21 days. After the adaptation period, 12 animals of each group were sacrificed at 5 moments: the beginning of experimental period (M0), 4 degrees day (M1), 7 degrees day (M2), 14 degrees day (M3) and 21 degrees day (M4). The diet to the other rats was maintained until the last sacrifice. The following variables were evaluated: body weight, blood albumin rate, tissue's hydroxyproline, hydroxyproline/total protein ratio and rupture strength in the intestinal wall of the ileum and the distal colon.

Results: It was observed that the rupture strength in the ileum segment and distal colon was lower in malnourished animals (Group 2); the loss of mechanical resistance was higher in the distal colon segment than in the ileum probably due to the smaller concentration of tissue collagen in the distal colon.

Conclusion: Protein malnutrition induces the loss of mechanical resistance of the ileum and distal colon and may be associated with a smaller percentage of collagenous tissue formation in the intestinal wall.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-86502008000500008DOI Listing
August 2009
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