Publications by authors named "Celeste Hollands"

14 Publications

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SAGES guidelines for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD).

Surg Endosc 2021 Sep 19;35(9):4903-4917. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Background: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is an extremely common condition with several medical and surgical treatment options. A multidisciplinary expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations to support clinicians, patients, and others in decisions regarding the treatment of GERD with an emphasis on evaluating different surgical techniques.

Methods: Literature reviews were conducted for 4 key questions regarding the surgical treatment of GERD in both adults and children: surgical vs. medical treatment, robotic vs. laparoscopic fundoplication, partial vs. complete fundoplication, and division vs. preservation of short gastric vessels in adults or maximal versus minimal dissection in pediatric patients. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated using the GRADE methodology by subject experts. Recommendations for future research were also proposed.

Results: The panel provided seven recommendations for adults and children with GERD. All recommendations were conditional due to very low, low, or moderate certainty of evidence. The panel conditionally recommended surgical treatment over medical management for adults with chronic or chronic refractory GERD. There was insufficient evidence for the panel to make a recommendation regarding surgical versus medical treatment in children. The panel suggested that once the decision to pursue surgical therapy is made, adults and children with GERD may be treated with either a robotic or a laparoscopic approach, and either partial or complete fundoplication based on surgeon-patient shared decision-making and patient values. In adults, the panel suggested either division or non-division of the short gastric vessels is appropriate, and that children should undergo minimal dissection during fundoplication.

Conclusions: These recommendations should provide guidance with regard to surgical decision-making in the treatment of GERD and highlight the importance of shared decision-making and patient values to optimize patient outcomes. Pursuing the identified research needs may improve future versions of guidelines for the treatment of GERD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-021-08625-5DOI Listing
September 2021

Surgical treatment of GERD: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Surg Endosc 2021 Aug 2;35(8):4095-4123. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 4062, Chicago, IL, 606037, USA.

Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a high worldwide prevalence in adults and children. There is uncertainty regarding medical versus surgical therapy and different surgical techniques. This review assessed outcomes of antireflux surgery versus medical management of GERD in adults and children, robotic versus laparoscopic fundoplication, complete versus partial fundoplication, and minimal versus maximal dissection in pediatric patients.

Methods: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched (2004-2019) to identify randomized control and non-randomized comparative studies. Two independent reviewers screened for eligibility. Random effects meta-analysis was performed on comparative data. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias and Newcastle Ottawa Scale.

Results: From 1473 records, 105 studies were included. Most had high or uncertain risk of bias. Analysis demonstrated that anti-reflux surgery was associated with superior short-term quality of life compared to PPI (Std mean difference =  - 0.51, 95%CI  - 0.63, - 0.40, I = 0%) however short-term symptom control was not significantly superior (RR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.47, 1.21, I = 82%). A proportion of patients undergoing operative treatment continue PPI treatment (28%). Robotic and laparoscopic fundoplication outcomes were similar. Compared to total fundoplication, partial fundoplication was associated with higher rates of prolonged PPI usage (RR = 2.06, 95%CI 1.08, 3.94, I = 45%). There was no statistically significant difference for long-term symptom control (RR = 0.94, 95%CI 0.85, 1.04, I = 53%) or long-term dysphagia (RR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.52, 1.02, I = 0%). Ien, minimal dissection during fundoplication was associated with lower reoperation rates than maximal dissection (RR = 0.21, 95%CI 0.06, 0.67).

Conclusions: The available evidence regarding the optimal treatment of GERD often suffers from high risk of bias. Additional high-quality randomized control trials may further inform surgical decision making in the treatment of GERD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-021-08358-5DOI Listing
August 2021

Intimate Partner Violence Among Surgeons: We are Not Immune.

Ann Surg 2021 03;273(3):387-392

Association of Women Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois.

Objective: The incidence and risk factors for IPV are not well-studied among surgeons. We sought to fill this gap in knowledge by surveying surgeons to estimate the incidence and identify risk factors associated with IPV.

Summary Of Background Data: An estimated 36.4% of women and 33.6% of men in the United States have experienced IPV. Risk factors include low SES, non-White ethnicity, psychiatric disorders, alcohol and drug abuse, and history of childhood abuse. Families with higher SES are not exempt from IPV, yet there is very little data examining incidence and risk factors among these populations.

Methods: An anonymous online survey targeting US-based surgeons was distributed through 4 major surgical societies. Demographics, history of abuse, and related factors were assessed. Chi-square analysis and multivariable logistic regression were utilized to evaluate for potential risk factors of IPV.

Results: Eight hundred eighty-two practicing surgeons and trainees completed the survey, of whom 536 (61%) reported experiencing some form of behavior consistent with IPV. The majority of respondents were women (74.1%, P = 0.004). Emotional abuse was most common (57.3%), followed by controlling behavior (35.6%), physical abuse (13.1%), and sexual abuse (9.6%).History of mental illness, [odds ratio (OR) 2.32, P < 0.001], alcohol use (frequent/daily OR 1.76, P = 0.035 and occasional OR 1.78, P = 0.015), childhood physical abuse (OR 1.96, P = 0.020), childhood emotional abuse (OR 1.76, P = 0.008), and female sex (OR 1.46, P = 0.022) were associated with IPV.

Conclusions: As the first national study of IPV among surgeons, this analysis demonstrates surgeons experience IPV and share similar risk factors to the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000004553DOI Listing
March 2021

Education and the pediatric surgeon.

J Pediatr Surg 2018 Feb 13;53(2):220-222. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, USA.

There have been many changes in the domain of clinical surgery over the last 2 decades, but probably none more so than in education. The British Association of Pediatric Surgeons recognizes the importance of this topic and has commissioned a special session on this subject jointly with the International Pediatric Endosurgery Group. Free papers presented on a number of educational subjects and specific topics of recruitment and simulation were covered in invited lectures. The session was completed with a keynote lecture from the renowned educationalist Professor Roger Kneebone.

Level Of Evidence: 5 (Expert Opinion).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2017.11.005DOI Listing
February 2018

General surgery career resource.

Am J Surg 2013 Nov;206(5):719-23

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA.

General surgery residency training can lead to a rewarding career in general surgery and serve as the foundation for careers in several surgical subspecialties. It offers broad-based training with exposure to the cognitive and technical aspects of several surgical specialties and prepares graduating residents for a wide range of career paths. This career development resource discusses the training aspects of general surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.07.010DOI Listing
November 2013

Strategies for building an effective mentoring relationship.

Am J Surg 2013 Nov;206(5):714-8

Southern Illinois University, Springfield, IL, USA.

Mentoring has been recognized as a critical aspect of the professional and/or personal development of the student, resident or faculty member. This career development resource discusses strategies for building effective mentoring relationships and outlines some of the challenges to contemporary mentoring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.08.001DOI Listing
November 2013

Human acellular dermal matrix for neonates with complex abdominal wall defects: short- and long-term outcomes.

Am Surg 2012 Jul;78(7):E346-8

Department of Surgery, University of South Alabama College of Medicine, Mobile, Alabama, USA.

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July 2012

Career development resource: promotion to associate professor.

Am J Surg 2012 Jul;204(1):130-4

Department of Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL, USA.

This will most likely be the first time through the promotion and tenure process for the faculty member. The faculty member is responsible for meeting with the department chair and/or division chief on a regular basis to determine if she is on the right time line to successfully achieve promotion to associate professor. A physician will begin seriously preparing her portfolio for promotion to associate professor about 5 to 6 years out of training, at which time she will have some considerable experience running a practice and managing her time. However, the planning process for promotion should begin immediately upon starting the first academic position.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.04.004DOI Listing
July 2012

Clinical and molecular characteristics of staphylococcal skin abscesses in children.

J Pediatr 2007 Dec 26;151(6):700-3. Epub 2007 Oct 26.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Forty-nine children with skin abscesses (36 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 13 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus) exhibited similar disease severity. Both pathogen groups were pulse field type USA300, multilocus sequence type 8, and possessed Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. Related microbial genetic architecture may account for similarities in disease severity despite differences in antibiotic susceptibility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.040DOI Listing
December 2007

The view of surgery department chairs on part time faculty in academic practice: results of a national survey.

Am J Surg 2006 Sep;192(3):366-71

Department of Surgery, Transplant Division, P.O. Box 800709, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0709, and Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital of Buffalo, NY, USA.

Background: Reduced resident work hours sparked debate regarding lifestyle of clinical faculty. We hypothesized surgery department chairs would not be supportive of part-time clinical faculty (PTF) and would be reluctant to grant requests to reduce total institutional commitment (TIC) or total professional effort.

Method: A 16-question survey was mailed to 202 surgery chairs requesting department demographics, and perception of PTF. Chairs were given the option of identifying themselves. PTF referred to full-time equivalent clinicians who reduce their TIC for personal/family reasons and did not include clinicians with research or teaching commitments limiting clinical responsibilities.

Results: A total of 112 of 186 (61.2%) delivered surveys were returned. Of these, 48.2% of respondents indicated clinicians had requested reduced TIC and 40.2% of departments had PTF. Only 1 chair was unable to grant a request to reduce TIC. A total of 42.8% of respondents indicated that PTF receive reduced salary-linked benefits but (58.9%) no change in either academic status or (52.7%) eligibility for promotion/tenure. The percentage of women faculty was 12.0% in departments with PTF and 10.5% in departments without PTF. A total of 42.8% of chairs agreed facilitating PTF would improve faculty retention versus 24.1% who disagreed (P<.0001). When compared with departments without PTF, chairs with PTF were more supportive that facilitating PTF would improve faculty retention (53.3% vs 32.7%, P<.001) and would be beneficial to their departments (57.8% vs 22.4%, P<.001). Sixty-two percent of respondents volunteered their names and contact information for follow-up.

Conclusions: Contrary to our hypothesis, surgery department chairs appear to be supportive of PTF and were interested in discussing this further.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2006.05.008DOI Listing
September 2006

Reduced social morbidity of laparoscopic appendectomy in children.

Am Surg 2004 Sep;70(9):779-82

Miniature Access Surgery Teaching, Training, and Robotic Research Center, The Women's and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14222, USA.

Laparoscopic appendectomy has not been uniformly adopted by pediatric surgeons. Our children's hospital adopted laparoscopic appendectomy due to perceived benefits to patients and their families. We hypothesized that laparoscopic appendectomy in children resulted in less social morbidity than those undergoing open appendectomy. A questionnaire focused on a set of postoperative variables affecting the patient's and the family's return to normal activities. Families expressed their answers as a range of days. Five different ranges were assigned a numerical value for 10 different social morbidity variables. The numerical values were analyzed using Pearson chi2 test; statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. The response rate was 55 per cent (134 of 244). Seventy-four had open and 47 laparoscopic appendectomy with a comparable incidence of acute and perforated appendicitis. Children undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy had shorter hospital stays and earlier resumption of feeding, return to school, return to pain-free walking and stair climbing, and resumption of normal activities including gym. Additionally, they had fewer wound problems, shorter duration of oral pain medication usage, and their parents returned to work quicker than the open group. All these were statistically significant. Laparoscopic appendectomy results in significantly reduced social morbidity for children and their families.
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September 2004

Minimal access extrapleural esophagoesophagostomy.

J Pediatr Surg 2004 Jun;39(6):855-8; discussion 855-8

Miniature Access Surgery Teaching, Training, and Robotic Research Center, The Women's and Children's Hospital of Buffalo University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA.

Background/purpose: Minimal access repair of esophageal atresia is gaining acceptance but usually requires a transpleural approach. An extrapleural approach using a 2-cm incision has been described. The purpose of this study was to develop a less-invasive approach to extrapleural esophagoesophagostomy.

Methods: A 5-8 kg nonsurvivor piglet model was used to develop this technique. The extrapleural dissection was performed under direct vision utilizing transpleural thoracoscopy. A 16-gauge needle and a spatula were used to create an extrapleural space that allowed insertion of a 3-mm trocar. An 8F catheter with a 3-mL balloon was inserted through the trocar and inflated to create enough space to exchange it for a 5-mm trocar. A 12F catheter with a 5-mL balloon was inserted through the 5-mm trocar and inflated to enlarge the space. These steps were repeated at each of the 3 extrapleural port sites until one confluent extrapleural space was created that did not communicate with the transpleural port site. Esophagoesophagostomy was then completed within the extrapleural space.

Results: Thoracoscopic guidance and balloon dissection facilitated creation of an adequate extrapleural working space.

Conclusions: This new minimal access extrapleural approach offers an attractive alternative to the currently described minimal access approaches to esophagoesophagostomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2004.02.024DOI Listing
June 2004

Robotic-assisted esophagoesophagostomy.

J Pediatr Surg 2002 Jul;37(7):983-5; discussion 983-5

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Background/purpose: Minimally invasive repair of esophageal atresia has been described but remains technically challenging. Robotic surgical systems address many of these technical challenges. The purpose of this study was to develop the procedure for and evaluate the technical feasibility of performing a robotic-assisted esophagoesophagostomy using the Zeus Robotic Surgical System.

Methods: Esophagoesophagostomy was performed in 10 piglets using thoracoscopic (control, n = 5) and robotic-assisted (Zeus, experimental, n = 5) approaches. An interrupted esophageal anastomosis using intracorporeal knot tying techniques was performed and evaluated for leak, narrowing, caliber, and mucosal approximation. Anesthesia, operative, anastomotic, and robotic set-up times were recorded as was the number of stitches used.

Results: All 10 anastomoses were patent with no narrowing and with excellent mucosal approximation. One anastomosis in the control group had a small leak. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for the parameters measured. Weight (kg): control (C), 6.4 +/- 0.8; experimental (E), 6.3 +/- 1.0, P =.08. Times (min): anesthesia, C-124 +/- 25, E-151 +/- 20, P =.09; operative, C-97 +/- 21, E-131 +/- 27, P =.06; anastomotic, C-89 +/- 20, E-125 +/- 34, P =.08; robotic set-up, C-6.4 +/- 9.3, E-15.6 +/- 20, P = 0.13. Stitches (No.): C-11.8 +/- 0.8, E-12.0 +/- 1.2, P =.7. Caliber (French):C-18F-5; E-18F-4, 14F-1.

Conclusion: Robotic-assisted esophagoesophagostomy is technically feasible and offers an alternative approach to thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/jpsu.2002.33823DOI Listing
July 2002

Applications of robotic surgery in pediatric patients.

Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 2002 Feb;12(1):71-6

Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport 71130, USA.

Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly becoming the standard approach to treatment for pediatric patients. Infants present a technical challenge due to the small size of structures and the small workspace available. Master-slave robotic surgical telemanipulators help overcome this challenge by facilitating microsurgery in a confined workspace. The Zeus Robotic Surgical System (Computer Motion, Inc., Goleta, CA, U.S.A.) was used to develop the robotic approach and to evaluate the technical feasibility of performing four technically challenging procedures that are typically performed in infants. Robotic enteroenterostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, portoenterostomy, and esophagoesophagostomy were performed in piglets and compared with the same procedures performed by standard minimally invasive techniques. Enteroenterostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and esophagoesophagostomy procedures were successfully developed and are technically feasible. The portoenterostomy procedure needs further study to validate data from the second set of experiments, showing a lower complication rate in the robotic group. Survivor studies are needed to fully elucidate the advantages that may be provided by the robotic approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00129689-200202000-00012DOI Listing
February 2002
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