Publications by authors named "Cecilia Isaksson"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prognostic impact of early-versus-late responses to different induction regimens in patients with myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation: Results from the CALM study by the CMWP of the EBMT.

Eur J Haematol 2021 May 27;106(5):708-715. Epub 2021 Feb 27.

University Hospital of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, INSERM, Infinite, Lille, France.

Background: In autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT)-eligible myeloma patients, prolonged induction does not necessarily improve the depth of response.

Method: We analyzed 1222 ASCT patients who were classified based on (a) the interval between induction and stem cell collection, (b) the type of induction regimen: BID (Bortezomib, IMiDs, and Dexamethasone), Bortezomib-based, or CTD (Cyclophosphamide, Thalidomide, and Dexamethasone), and (c) the time to best response (Early ie, best response within 4 or 5 months, depending on the regimen vs Late; Good ie, VGPR or better vs Poor).

Results: The length of induction treatment required to achieve a Good response did not affect PFS (P = .65) or OS (P = .61) post-ASCT. The three types of regimen resulted in similar outcomes: median PFS 31, 27.7 and 30.8 months (P = .31), and median OS 81.7, 92.7, and 77.4 months, respectively (P = .83). On multivariate analysis, neither the type nor the duration of the induction regimen affected OS and PFS, except for Early Good Responders who had a better PFS compared to Early Poor Responders (HR = 1.21, P-value = .02). However, achieving a Good response at induction was associated with a better response (≥VGPR) post-transplant.

Conclusion: The kinetics of response did not affect outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13602DOI Listing
May 2021

Central nervous system disorders after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a prospective study of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of EBMT.

J Neurol 2020 Feb 29;267(2):430-439. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Collegium Medicum UMK, Bydgoszcz, Poland.

We performed a prospective study to evaluate the types and characteristics of central nervous system (CNS) disorders in patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study included 163 episodes of CNS disorders of which 58 (36%) were infections. Proven or probable infections were documented in 34 patients and included fungi (n = 10, 29%), viruses (n = 12, 35%), Toxoplasma spp. (n = 9, 27%) and bacteria (n = 3, 9%). Non-infectious neurological disorders (n = 105, 64%) frequently encompassed metabolic/drug-induced abnormalities (n = 28, 27%) or cerebral vascular events (n = 22, 21%). Median onset times were later for infectious (day + 101) vs non-infectious neurological disorders (day + 50, p = 0.009). An unremarkable cranial CT scan was found in 33% of infection episodes. Absence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis despite a normal or increased peripheral blood white blood cell count occurred in 26% of infections. Day-30 mortality rates were significantly higher for fungal (87%) vs non-fungal infections (40%, p < 0.001). Significantly higher mortality rates were also documented for cerebral vascular events than for other non-infectious disorders (86% vs 34%, p < 0.001). Our prospective study shows that diagnostic findings in CNS infections might differ between hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and immunocompetent hosts. Special awareness and timely initiation of adequate diagnostics are crucial to improve the prognosis of these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-019-09578-5DOI Listing
February 2020

High Graft-versus-Host Disease-Free, Relapse/Rejection-Free Survival and Similar Outcome of Related and Unrelated Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Aplastic Anemia: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 10 4;25(10):1970-1974. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Section of Hematology and Coagulation, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) as primary treatment for aplastic anemia (AA) is being increasingly used. Yet, age, stem cell source, and donor type are important outcome factors. We have recently performed a nationwide cohort study of all patients with AA in Sweden diagnosed from 2000 to 2011 and now present outcome data on SCT patients. In total, 68 patients underwent SCT, and 63% of them had failed immunosuppressive therapy. We found that, with a median follow-up of 109 months (range, 35 to 192 months), 5-year overall survival (OS) for all patients was 86.8%, whereas graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse/rejection-free survival (GRFS) at 5 years was 69.1%. There was no survival impact regarding the donor type or stem cell source. Patients aged ≥40 years had a higher transplant-related mortality (29.4% versus 7.8%; P = .023), which translated into a lower 5-year OS: 70.6% versus 92.2% (P = .022) and a trend of lower GRFS (52.9% versus 74.5%; P = .069). In conclusion, we found in this real-world setting that both OS and GRFS were high, but SCT for patients with AA aged ≥40 years is problematic, and clinical trials addressing this issue are warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.05.032DOI Listing
October 2019

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia in the TKI era: population-based data from the Swedish CML registry.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2019 11 8;54(11):1764-1774. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Medical Sciences, Division of Hematology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

Two decades after the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), a sizeable portion of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP) still undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We investigated the indications for allo-HSCT, clinical outcome, management of relapse, and post-transplant TKI treatment in a population-based setting using the Swedish CML registry. Of 118 CML patients transplanted between 2002 and 2017, 56 (47.4%) received allo-HSCT in first CP, among whom TKI resistance was the most common transplant indication (62.5%). For patients diagnosed with CML in CP at <65 years of age, the cumulative probability of undergoing allo-HSCT within 5 years was 9.7%. Overall 5-year survival was 96.2%, 70.1% and 36.9% when transplanted in first CP, second or later CP, and in accelerated phase or blast crisis, respectively. Risk factors for relapse were EBMT score >2 and reduced intensity conditioning, and for death, CP > 2 at time point of allo-HSCT only. Non-relapse mortality for patients transplanted in CP was 11.6%. Our data indicate that allo-HSCT still constitutes a reasonable therapeutic option for patients with CML in first CP, especially those resistant to TKI treatment, providing high long-term survival and low non-relapse mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-019-0513-5DOI Listing
November 2019

Association of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant vs Donor Lymphocyte Infusion With Overall Survival in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse.

JAMA Oncol 2018 09;4(9):1245-1253

Acute Leukemia Working Party, European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Paris Study Office, Paris, France.

Importance: The optimal treatment approach to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who relapse after an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) remains elusive. No randomized clinical trial comparing survival outcomes of a second allo-HCT (allo-HCT2) vs donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) has been conducted to date.

Objective: To compare overall survival (OS) after an allo-HCT2 or DLI in relapsed AML after a first allo-HCT.

Design, Setting, And Participants: A retrospective registry study from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation involving 418 adults who received an allo-HCT2 (n = 137) or DLI (n = 281) for postallograft-relapsed AML. Analysis was assessed on the principle of intent-to-first received intervention. The data were collected from November 21, 2015, to May 15, 2017, and analysis was performed June 1, 2017.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Number of patients with relapsed AML who are alive after 2 years and 5 years from receiving an allo-HCT2 or DLI.

Results: Of the 418 patients, 228 (54.5%) were men; mean age was 46.2 years (interquartile range, 36.5-56.9 years). There was no apparent difference in OS whether an allo-HCT2 or DLI was prescribed (2-year OS with allo-HCT2, 26%; 5-year OS with allo-HCT2, 19%; 2-year OS with DLI, 25%; 5-year OS with DLI, 15%; P = .86). Overall survival was better if either of these procedures was offered when the patient was in complete remission (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.74; P < .001). Conversely, OS was low for patients relapsing within less than 6 months after an allo-HCT1, regardless of the treatment prescribed (5-year OS: allo-HCT2, 9%; 95% CI, 1%-17% vs DLI, 4%; 95% CI, 1%-8%; P = .86).

Conclusion And Relevance: Heterogeneity of the patient-, disease-, and treatment-related characteristics limit the ability to recommend one approach over another. Findings of this study highlight that best outcomes seem to be achieved in patients relapsing 6 or more months from an allo-HCT1 or those in complete remission at the time of either allo-HCT2 or DLI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.2091DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6143013PMC
September 2018

Low response rate to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy in very severe aplastic anaemia - A Swedish nationwide cohort study.

Eur J Haematol 2018 Jun 10;100(6):613-620. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Objectives: Antithymocyte globulin (ATG)-based immunosuppression remains a cornerstone in aplastic anaemia (AA) treatment. However, most ATG studies are not population-based and knowledge about real-world results concerning response and outcome could offer important information for treating physicians.

Methods: We have recently performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study on all AA patients diagnosed in Sweden in 2000-2011 and now present treatment and outcome data on patients receiving first-line ATG. In total, 158 patients showed a 47.0% response rate which was similar in all age groups (range 41.5%-51.7%) with no difference regarding ATG formulation. The response was significantly associated with severity grade-especially at time of treatment initiation: very severe (VSAA) 22.7%; severe (SAA) 54.5% (P < .001); and non-severe 88.5% (P < .001). A logistic regression-based predictive model indicated that VSAA patients with an absolute reticulocyte count <25 × 10 /L had only a 19% probability of response. In a multivariable analysis, age and VSAA at the time of treatment were the independent factors for inferior survival.

Conclusions: Real-world VSAA patients respond poorly to ATG which indicates the need for a different treatment approach. Our findings suggest that age alone should not be a discriminating factor for administering ATG treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13057DOI Listing
June 2018

Incidence, Risk Factors, and Long-term Outcome of Acute Leukemia Patients With Early Candidemia After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Study by the Acute Leukemia and Infectious Diseases Working Parties of European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Clin Infect Dis 2018 08;67(4):564-572

Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Nicolaus Copernicus University Torun, Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Background: This study was performed to assess the incidence of and risk factors for Candida infection in the first 100 days after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the impact on long-term survival.

Methods: We performed an outcome analysis of 28542 acute leukemia patients who underwent HSCT from 2000 to 2012. There were 347 patients with candidemia by day 100 and 28195 without candidemia or any other type of Candida infection.

Results: The incidence of candidemia by day 100 was 1.2% and occurred at a median of 22 days after HSCT. Higher 100-day nonrelapse mortality (NRM; hazards ratio [HR], 3.0, P < .0001) and lower 100-day overall survival (OS; HR, 2.5, P < .0001) were observed in patients with candidemia. The case fatality rate by day 100 in patients with candidemia was 22% (76/347). Factors associated with candidemia occurrence were female gender, bone marrow or cord blood stem cell source, T-cell depletion, use of total body irradiation, and acute graft vs host disease. Among the patients alive at day 100, the 5-year NRM and OS after a median follow-up of 5.6 years (95% confidence interval, 5.5 - 5.7) for patients with and without candidemia were 22.5% vs 13.5%, P < .0001 and 45.6% vs. 53.4%, P = .0003, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of a candidemia episode by day 100 was an independent risk factor for higher NRM (HR, 1.7, P = .001) and lower OS (HR, 1.4, P = .001).

Conclusions: The early occurrence of candidemia after HSCT is still associated with higher NRM and lower short- and-long-term OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciy150DOI Listing
August 2018

Incidence of Second Primary Malignancies after Autologous Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma in the Era of Novel Agents.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 05 12;24(5):930-936. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

The advent of novel agents for multiple myeloma (MM) is cause for a re-examination of the incidence of second primary malignancies (SPMs). We examined the SPM rate in MM patients who were enrolled in the prospective observational CALM (Collaboration to Collect Autologous Transplant outcome in Lymphoma and Myeloma) study. Between 2008 and 2012, 3204 patients with MM underwent a first autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Plerixafor was used as a mobilizing agent for patients with poor (or potentially poor) stem cell mobilization as defined by the respective centers. A total of 135 patients developed SPMs, with a cumulative incidence of 5.3% (95% confidence interval, 4.4 to 6.3) at 72 months. Ninety-four patients developed solid tumors, 30 developed hematologic malignancies, and 11 developed an SPM of an unknown type. The cumulative incidence of known hematologic and solid malignancies were 1.4% and 3.6%, respectively, at 72 months. In a univariate analysis, use of radiotherapy, type of induction regimen, hematopoietic stem cell dose, poor mobilizer status, plerixafor use, and sex did not influence the cumulative incidence of SPMs. Only age over 65 years was statistically associated with an increased incidence. Overall, the incidence of SPMs was comparable to earlier estimations of SPMs in MM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.01.006DOI Listing
May 2018

Melphalan 140 mg/m or 200 mg/m for autologous transplantation in myeloma: results from the Collaboration to Collect Autologous Transplant Outcomes in Lymphoma and Myeloma (CALM) study. A report by the EBMT Chronic Malignancies Working Party.

Haematologica 2018 03 7;103(3):514-521. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Melphalan at a dose of 200 mg/m is standard conditioning prior to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma, but a dose of 140 mg/m is often used in clinical practice in patients perceived to be at risk of excess toxicity. To determine whether melphalan 200 mg/m and melphalan 140 mg/m are equally effective and tolerable in clinically relevant patient subgroups we analyzed 1964 first single autologous transplantation episodes using a series of Cox proportional-hazards models. Overall survival, progression-free survival, cumulative incidence of relapse, non-relapse mortality, hematopoietic recovery and second primary malignancy rates were not significantly different between the melphalan 140 mg/m (n=245) and melphalan 200 mg/m (n=1719) groups. Multivariable subgroup analysis showed that disease status at transplantation interacted with overall survival, progression-free survival, and cumulative incidence of relapse, with a significant advantage associated with melphalan 200 mg/m in patients transplanted in less than partial response (adjusted hazard ratios for melphalan 200 mg/m melphalan 140 mg/m: 0.5, 0.54, and 0.56). In contrast, transplantation in very good partial or complete response significantly favored melphalan 140 mg/m for overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.02). Age, renal function, prior proteasome inhibitor treatment, gender, or Karnofsky score did not interact with overall/progression-free survival or relapse rate in the melphalan dose groups. There were no significant survival or relapse rate differences between melphalan 200 mg/m and melphalan 140 mg/m patients with high-risk or standard-risk chromosomal abnormalities. In conclusion, remission status at the time of transplantation may favor the use of melphalan 200 mg/m or melphalan 140 mg/m for key transplant outcomes (NCT01362972).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2017.181339DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5830386PMC
March 2018

Incidence and outcome of acquired aplastic anemia: real-world data from patients diagnosed in Sweden from 2000-2011.

Haematologica 2017 10 27;102(10):1683-1690. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

South Älvsborg Hospital Borås, Sweden.

A plastic anemia is a rare life-threatening disease. However, since the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation, the outcome has improved considerably, and the 5-year survival is reported to be 70-80% in selected patient cohorts. Yet, contemporary population-based data on incidence and survival are lacking. We performed a national retrospective study to determine the incidence, treatment, and survival of patients with aplastic anemia diagnosed in Sweden from 2000-2011. Patients were included via the National Patient Registry, and diagnosed according to the Camitta criteria. In total, 257 confirmed cases were identified, with an overall incidence of 2.35 (95% CI: 2.06-2.64) cases per million inhabitants per year. Median age was 60 years (range: 2-92), and median follow up was 76 (0-193) months. Primary treatments included immunosuppressive therapy (63%), allogenic stem cell transplantation (10%), or single-agent cyclosporine/no specific therapy (27%). The 5-year survival was 90.7% in patients aged 0-18 years, 90.5% in patients aged 19-39 years, 70.7% in patients aged 40-59 years, and 38.1% in patients aged ≥60 years. Multivariate analysis showed that age (both 40-59 and ≥60 age groups), very severe aplastic anemia and single-agent cyclosporine/no specific therapy were independent risk factors for inferior survival. In conclusion, younger aplastic anemia patients experience a very good long-term survival, while that of patients ≥60 years in particular remains poor. Apparently, the challenge today is to improve the management of older aplastic anemia patients, and prospective studies to address this medical need are warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2017.169862DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5622852PMC
October 2017

Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive multiple sclerosis: the Swedish experience.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2014 Oct 19;85(10):1116-21. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Department of Neurology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a viable option for treatment of aggressive multiple sclerosis (MS). No randomised controlled trial has been performed, and thus, experiences from systematic and sustained follow-up of treated patients constitute important information about safety and efficacy. In this observational study, we describe the characteristics and outcome of the Swedish patients treated with HSCT for MS.

Methods: Neurologists from the major hospitals in Sweden filled out a follow-up form with prospectively collected data. Fifty-two patients were identified in total; 48 were included in the study and evaluated for safety and side effects; 41 patients had at least 1 year of follow-up and were further analysed for clinical and radiological outcome. In this cohort, 34 patients (83%) had relapsing-remitting MS, and mean follow-up time was 47 months.

Results: At 5 years, relapse-free survival was 87%; MRI event-free survival 85%; expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score progression-free survival 77%; and disease-free survival (no relapses, no new MRI lesions and no EDSS progression) 68%. Presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions prior to HSCT was associated with a favourable outcome (disease-free survival 79% vs 46%, p=0.028). There was no mortality. The most common long-term side effects were herpes zoster reactivation (15%) and thyroid disease (8.4%).

Conclusions: HSCT is a very effective treatment of inflammatory active MS and can be performed with a high degree of safety at experienced centres.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2013-307207DOI Listing
October 2014